Wednesday 11pm: Feature LP – The Who – Who’s Next (1971)

February 20, 2019
Editor In Chief

Who’s Next is the fifth studio album by English rock band The Who. It developed from the aborted Lifehouse project, a multi-media rock opera written by the group’s Pete Townshend as a follow-up to the band’s 1969 album Tommy. The project was cancelled due to its complexity and conflicts with Kit Lambert, the band’s manager, but Townshend was persuaded to record the songs as a straightforward studio album.

The Who recorded Who’s Next with assistance from recording engineer Glyn Johns. After producing the song “Won’t Get Fooled Again” in the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio, they relocated to Olympic Studios to record and mix most of the album’s remaining songs. They made prominent use of the synthesizer on the album, particularly on “Won’t Get Fooled Again” and “Baba O’Riley”, which were both released as singles. The cover photo was shot by Ethan Russell and made reference to the monolith in the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey, as it featured group members having urinated against a concrete piling protruding from a slag heap.

Who’s Next was an immediate success when it was released in August 1971. It has since been viewed by critics as the Who’s best record and one of the greatest albums of all time. It was reissued on CD several times with additional songs originally intended for Lifehouse.

1. “Baba O’Riley” 5:08
2. “Bargain” 5:34
3. “Love Ain’t for Keeping” 2:10
4. “My Wife” Entwistle 3:41
5. “The Song Is Over” 6:14

1. “Getting in Tune” 4:50
2. “Going Mobile” 3:42
3. “Behind Blue Eyes” 3:42
4. “Won’t Get Fooled Again” 8:32

Wednesday 10pm: Feature LP: Queen – A Day At The Races (1976)

February 20, 2019
Editor In Chief

A Day at the Races is the fifth studio album by the British rock band Queen, released on 10 December 1976. It was the band’s first completely self-produced album, and the first not to feature producer Roy Thomas Baker. Recorded at Sarm East, The Manor and Wessex Studios in England, A Day at the Races was engineered by Mike Stone. The title of the album followed suit with its predecessor A Night at the Opera, taking its name from the subsequent film by the Marx Brothers.

The album peaked at #1 in the UK, Japan and the Netherlands. It reached #5 on the US Billboard 200 and was Queen’s fifth album to ship gold in the US, and subsequently reached platinum status in the same country.

A Day at the Races was voted the 67th greatest album of all time in a national 2006 BBC poll.

1. “Tie Your Mother Down” 4:48
2. “You Take My Breath Away” 5:09
3. “Long Away” 3:34
4. “The Millionaire Waltz” 4:54
5. “You and I” 3:25

1. “Somebody to Love” 4:56
2. “White Man” 4:59
3. “Good Old-Fashioned Lover Boy” 2:54
4. “Drowse” 3:45
5. “Teo Torriatte (Let Us Cling Together)” 5:50

Tuesday 11pm: Feature LP: Aerosmith – Nine Lives (1997)

February 19, 2019
Editor In Chief

Aerosmith_-_Nine_LivesNine Lives is the 12th studio album by American rock band Aerosmith, released March 18, 1997. The album was produced by Aerosmith and Kevin Shirley, and was the band’s first studio album released by Columbia Records since 1982’s Rock in a Hard Place. It peaked at #1 at the Billboard Charts. One of the album’s singles, “Pink”, won a Grammy for Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal.

1. “Nine Lives”   4:01
2. “Falling in Love (Is Hard on the Knees)”   3:26
3. “Hole in My Soul”   6:10
4. “Taste of India”   5:53
5. “Full Circle”   5:01
6. “Something’s Gotta Give”   3:37
7. “Ain’t That a Bitch”   5:25
8. “The Farm”   4:27
9. “Crash”   4:26
10. “Kiss Your Past Good-Bye”   4:32
11. “Pink”   3:55
12. “Attitude Adjustment”   3:45
13. “Fallen Angels”   8:16

 

Monday 10pm: Feature LP: Adele – 21 (2011)

February 19, 2019
Editor In Chief

21Adele21 is the second studio album by English recording artist Adele. Released on 24 January 2011 in most of Europe, and on 22 February 2011 in North America, it was named after the age of the singer during its production. The album shares the folk and Motown soul influences of her 2008 debut album 19, but was further inspired by the American country and Southern blues music to which she had been exposed during her 2008–2009 North American tour An Evening with Adele. Composed in the aftermath of the singer’s separation from her partner, the album explores themes of anger, revenge, heartbreak, self-examination, and forgiveness.

Adele began writing 21 in April 2009, while still involved in the relationship that subsequently inspired the record. Dissatisfied with once again portraying herself as the musical tragedian of her debut, she had intended to compose a more upbeat and contemporary follow-up. However, studio sessions ended prematurely due to a lack of inspiration. She resumed production immediately after the breakdown of her relationship, channeling her heartbreak and depression into her songs. Adele collaborated with various songwriters and producers, including Columbia Records co-president Rick Rubin, Paul Epworth, Ryan Tedder, Jim Abbiss, and Dan Wilson.

Praised by critics for its understated production, vintage authenticity, and Adele’s vocal performance, 21 defied the modest commercial expectations of her indie record label XL Recordings and became a sleeper hit in 2011. The album topped the charts in more than 30 countries and appeared in the 2012 edition of the Guinness World Records. The United Kingdom’s best-selling album of the 21st century, its 23-week tenure atop the UK Albums Chart is the longest by a female solo artist. In the United States the album held the top position for 24 weeks, longer than any other album since 1985, and was certified Diamond. Singles “Rolling in the Deep”, “Someone like You” and “Set Fire to the Rain” became worldwide number-one hits, while “Rumour Has It” and “Turning Tables” charted in the top 20 across Europe and North America.

Globally, 21 was the biggest selling musical release for both 2011 and 2012, and helped revitalise lagging sales of the United States and UK music industry. Critics hailed the album as a shift from the overtly sexual and sonically bombastic status quo, and attributed its success to its deeply autobiographical yet universal songs. As of December 2012, the album has sold over 26.5 million copies worldwide according to the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry. 21 was nominated for the 2011 Mercury Prize and the following year won the Grammy Award for Album of the Year and the BRIT Award for British Album of the Year. – Wikipedia

 

 

 

Friday 10pm: Feature LP: Pat Benatar – Crimes of Passion (1980)

February 15, 2019
Editor In Chief

Crimes of Passion is the second studio album by American rock singer Pat Benatar, released on August 5, 1980 by Chrysalis Records. The album is the first to feature Myron Grombacher on drums, beginning a long tenure in Benatar’s band that would last into the late-1990s.

The album debuted on the US Billboard 200 album chart the week ending August 23 and held at No. 2 for five weeks in the US in January 1981, behind John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s Double Fantasy. It contains the hits “Hit Me with Your Best Shot” (US No. 9), “You Better Run” (US No. 42), “Treat Me Right” (US No. 18), plus a cover of Kate Bush’s international hit, “Wuthering Heights”. Crimes of Passion is Benatar’s biggest selling career album, having been certified 4x Platinum (for sales of over four million copies) in the United States alone. In Billboard magazine’s year end chart, Crimes of Passion was listed at number 5.

The song “Hell Is for Children”, which was not released as an A-side single, was also a hit on album-rock stations. A live version of this song from her album Live from Earth (1983) was released as the B-side of her “Love Is a Battlefield” single three years later. The song was featured in the 1981 animated film American Pop, as well as on the soundtrack.

In 1981, Benatar won her first Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance thanks to Crimes of Passion.

The music video for the song “You Better Run” was the second music video ever aired on MTV in 1981.

Crimes of Passion was reissued and remastered on Capitol Records in 2006.

1. “Treat Me Right” 3:24
2. “You Better Run” 3:02
3. “Never Wanna Leave You” 3:13
4. “Hit Me with Your Best Shot” 2:51
5. “Hell Is for Children” 4:48
6. “Little Paradise” 3:32
7. “I’m Gonna Follow You 4:28
8. “Wuthering Heights” 4:28
9. “Prisoner of Love” 3:05
10. “Out-A-Touch” 4:19

Thursday 10:30pm: Beatles: George Harrison – All Things Must Pass (1970)

February 14, 2019
Editor In Chief

All Things Must Pass is a triple album by English rock musician George Harrison. Recorded and released in 1970, it was Harrison’s first solo work following the break-up of the Beatles in April that year, and his third solo album overall. It includes the hit singles “My Sweet Lord” and “What Is Life”, as well as songs such as “Isn’t It a Pity” and the title track that had been turned down for inclusion on releases by the Beatles. The album reflects the influence of Harrison’s musical activities with artists such as Bob Dylan, the Band, Delaney & Bonnie and Billy Preston during 1968–70, and his growth as an artist beyond his supporting role to former bandmates John Lennon and Paul McCartney. All Things Must Pass introduced Harrison’s signature sound, the slide guitar, and the spiritual themes that would be present throughout his subsequent solo work. The original vinyl release consisted of two LPs of songs and a third disc of informal jams, titled Apple Jam. Several commentators interpret Barry Feinstein’s album cover photo, showing Harrison surrounded by four garden gnomes, as a statement on his independence from the Beatles.

Production began at London’s Abbey Road Studios in May 1970, with extensive overdubbing and mixing continuing through October. Among the large cast of backing musicians were Eric Clapton and Delaney & Bonnie’s Friends band – three of whom formed Derek and the Dominos with Clapton during the recording – as well as Ringo Starr, Gary Wright, Preston, Klaus Voormann, John Barham, Badfinger and Pete Drake. The sessions produced a double album’s worth of extra material, most of which remains unissued.

All Things Must Pass was critically and commercially successful on release, with long stays at number 1 on charts around the world. The album was co-produced by Phil Spector and employs his Wall of Sound production technique to notable effect; Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone described the sound as “Wagnerian, Brucknerian, the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”. Reflecting the widespread surprise at the assuredness of Harrison’s post-Beatles debut, Melody Maker’s Richard Williams likened the album to Greta Garbo’s first role in a talking picture and declared: “Garbo talks! – Harrison is free!” According to Colin Larkin, writing in the 2011 edition of his Encyclopedia of Popular Music, All Things Must Pass is “generally rated” as the best of all the former Beatles’ solo albums.

“I’d Have You Anytime” (Harrison, Bob Dylan) – 2:56
“My Sweet Lord” – 4:38
“Wah-Wah” – 5:35
“Isn’t It a Pity (Version One)” – 7:10
“What Is Life” – 4:22
“If Not for You” (Dylan) – 3:29
“Behind That Locked Door” – 3:05
“Let It Down” – 4:57
“Run of the Mill” – 2:49
“Beware of Darkness” – 3:48
“Apple Scruffs” – 3:04
“Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)” – 3:48
“Awaiting on You All” – 2:45
“All Things Must Pass” – 3:44
“I Dig Love” – 4:55
“Art of Dying” – 3:37
“Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)” – 4:45
“Hear Me Lord” – 5:46
“Out of the Blue” – 11:14
“It’s Johnny’s Birthday” (Bill Martin, Phil Coulter, Harrison) – 0:49
“Plug Me In” – 3:18
“I Remember Jeep” – 8:07
“Thanks for the Pepperoni” – 5:31

Thursday 10pm: The Beatles – Let It Be (1970)

February 14, 2019
Editor In Chief

Let It Be is the twelfth and final studio album by the English rock band the Beatles. It was released on 8 May 1970, almost a month after the group’s break-up. Like most of the band’s previous releases, it was a number one album in many countries, including both the US and the UK, and was released in tandem with the motion picture of the same name.

The album was conceived as a return to the Beatles’ earlier, less complicated approach to music. It was recorded and projected for release (under its original title of Get Back) before their album Abbey Road (1969); for this reason, some critics and fans, such as Mark Lewisohn, argue that Abbey Road should be considered the group’s final album and Let It Be the penultimate. Rehearsals began at Twickenham Film Studios in January 1969 as part of a planned documentary showing the Beatles preparing to return to live performance. A project initiated by Paul McCartney, the filmed rehearsals were marked by ill-feeling, leading to George Harrison’s temporary departure from the group. As a condition of his return, the Beatles reconvened at their own Apple Studio, where they completed the recordings with the help of guest musician Billy Preston. It is one of three albums to not feature any lead vocals by Ringo Starr.

Following several rejected mixes by Glyn Johns, a new version of the album was produced by Phil Spector in March–April 1970. While three songs from the sessions were released as singles before the album’s release, “Get Back”/”Don’t Let Me Down” and “Let It Be”, the songs were remixed by Spector for the album and “Don’t Let Me Down” was not included. Let It Be… Naked was released in 2003, an alternative version of the album, without any of Spector’s production work and using some different takes of songs.

1. “Two of Us” 3:36
2. “Dig a Pony” 3:54
3. “Across the Universe” 3:48
4. “I Me Mine” 2:26
5. “Dig It” 0:50
6. “Let It Be” 4:03
7. “Maggie Mae” 0:40

1. “I’ve Got a Feeling” 3:37
2. “One After 909” 2:54
3. “The Long and Winding Road” 3:38
4. “For You Blue” 2:32
5. “Get Back” 3:09

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