Tuesday 8pm: Feature LP: Elton John – Caribou (1974)

Elton_John_-_CaribouCaribou is the eighth album by the English singer-songwriter Elton John, released in 1974 (see 1974 in music). It was John’s fourth chart-topping album in the United States and his third in the United Kingdom. The album contains the singles, “Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me”, which reached number 16 in the UK Singles Chart and number 2 in the US, and “The Bitch Is Back“, which reached number 15 in the UK and number 4 in the US. Both these singles reached number 1 in Canada on the RPM 100 national Top Singles Chart (as did the album itself). The album was named for the Caribou Ranch recording studio, where part of the album was recorded. Elton and associates previously recorded three albums at Château d’Hérouville in France. In the US the album was certified gold in July 1974 and was certified platinum and 2x platinum in March 1993 by the RIAA.

In the liner notes to the 1995 CD re-release, John described the album as being quickly recorded in January 1974, with only about 9 days to get everything recorded, as he and the band “were under enormous pressure” to finish the album and then immediately embark on a Japanese tour. Producer Gus Dudgeon would later add additional backing vocals, horns and other overdubs after John and the band had finished their work.

In addition to the singles, John has over the years played several others songs from this album in concert, including “Grimsby”, “You’re So Static”, “Ticking” and “Dixie Lily”. The 1995 CD reissue contains four songs from the general period in and around the “Caribou” release, though only two of them, the b-sides “Sick City” and “Cold Highway”, were recorded during the album’s sessions. “Step Into Christmas” was recorded during a previous one-off single session, and “Pinball Wizard” was recorded at The Who’s Rampart Studios in England during the sessions for the “Tommy” movie score and soundtrack album.

All songs by Elton John and Bernie Taupin, except where noted.

“The Bitch Is Back” – 3:44
“Pinky” – 3:54
“Grimsby” – 3:47
“Dixie Lily” – 2:54
“Solar Prestige a Gammon” – 2:52
“You’re So Static” – 4:52

“I’ve Seen the Saucers” – 4:48
“Stinker” – 5:20
“Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me” – 5:36
“Ticking” – 7:33

Bonus tracks (1995 Mercury and 1996 Rocket reissue)
“Pinball Wizard” (Pete Townshend) – 5:09
“Sick City” – 5:23
“Cold Highway” – 3:25
Step into Christmas” – 4:32

When MCA Records re-issued this album, on cassette tape, in the 1980s, “You’re So Static” and “Stinker” were swapped in the album’s running order. You’re So Static also featured an early fade out.

At one point, the title of this album was to be “Ol’ Pink Eyes Is Back” a pun on Frank Sinatra’s “Ol’ Blue Eyes Is Back”.
On the 1995 CD, “You’re So Static” is spelled incorrectly as “Your’re So Static”.

Tuesday 9pm: Feature LP: Judas Priest – Firepower (2018)

Firepower is the 18th studio album by British heavy metal band Judas Priest. It is the first studio album since 1988’s Ram It Down to be produced by Tom Allom, and the first one with Andy Sneap as co-producer. Music videos were made for “Lightning Strike” and “Spectre”.  More info from Wikipedia

Wednesday 11pm: Feature LP: Elton John – 21 at 33 (1980)

21 at 33, released May 1980, is an album by Elton John. It is his fourteenth studio album. Including other releases (three compilation albums, two live albums, one film soundtrack and one EP) it is the 21st official release, and was released when Elton John was 33 years old; hence the title.

It was recorded at Super Bear Studios, Nice, France, in August 1979, and Rumbo Recorders and Sunset Sound in Los Angeles, California between January to March 1980.

The album sold over 900,000 copies in the United States, narrowly missing a Platinum certification. – Wikipedia

Wednesday 10pm: Feature LP: Wings – At The Speed Of Sound (1976)

Wings at the Speed of Sound is the fifth studio album by Wings, released on 25 March 1976 as a follow-up to their previous album Venus and Mars. Issued at the height of the band’s popularity, it reached the top spot on the US album chart and peaked at number 2 on the UK album chart. Both singles from the album also reached the top 5 of the UK and US singles charts, with ‘Silly Love Songs’ reaching number 1 in the US.

The album was recorded and released in the midst of Wings’ highly successful Wings Over the World tour, with songs from the album performed on the tour after its release. Subsequently, performances of ‘Let ‘Em In’, ‘Silly Love Songs’ and ‘Beware My Love’ were included on the live album Wings over America, released in December 1976.

As a reaction to critics who believed Wings was merely a vehicle for Paul McCartney, the album featured every member of the band taking lead vocals on at least one song, and two songs from the album are written or co-written by band members other than the McCartneys. – Wikipedia

Thursday 12:10pm: Alice’s Restaurant by Arlo Guthrie

“Alice’s Restaurant Massacree” is a record by singer-songwriter Arlo Guthrie, released as the title track to his 1967 debut album Alice’s Restaurant. It is notable as a satirical, first-person account of 1960s counterculture, in addition to being a hit song in its own right and an inspiration for the 1969 film, also named Alice’s Restaurant. The song is Guthrie’s most prominent work, based on a true incident from his life that began on Thanksgiving Day 1965 with a citation for littering, and ended with the refusal of the U.S. Army to draft him because of his conviction for that crime. The ironic punch line of the story is that, in the words of Guthrie, “I’m sittin’ here on the Group W bench ’cause you want to know if I’m moral enough to join the Army—burn women, kids, houses and villages—after bein’ a litterbug.” The final part of the song is an encouragement for the listeners to sing along, to resist the draft, and to end war.

The song consists of a protracted spoken monologue, with a constantly repeated fingerstyle ragtime guitar (Piedmont style) backing, bookended by a short chorus about the titular diner; Guthrie has used the short “Alice’s Restaurant” bookends and guitar backings for other monologues bearing the Alice’s Restaurant name. The track lasts 18 minutes and 34 seconds, occupying the entire A-side of the Alice’s Restaurant album. The work has become Guthrie’s signature song and he has periodically re-released it with updated lyrics.

Tuesday 6pm: Across The Tracks – Roy Orbison

Today we feature the music of Roy Orbison and The Traveling Wilburys.  A new release titles “A Love So Beautiful” featuring Roy Orbison and The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra with a remix of some of his popular music. 

Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988) was an American singer-songwriter known for his distinctive, impassioned voice, complex song structures, and dark emotional ballads. The combination led many critics to describe his music as operatic, nicknaming him “the Caruso of Rock” and “the Big O.” Between 1960 and 1964, 22 of his songs placed on the Billboard Top 40, including “Only the Lonely” (1960), “Crying” (1961), “In Dreams” (1963), and “Oh, Pretty Woman” (1964).

Born in Texas, Orbison began singing in a rockabilly and country and western band in high school. He was signed by Sam Phillips, Sun Records in 1956, but his greatest success came with Monument Records in the early 1960s. While most male rock and roll performers in the 1950s and 1960s projected a defiant masculinity, many of Orbison’s songs instead conveyed a quiet, almost desperate, vulnerability. His voice ranged from baritone to tenor, and music scholars have suggested that he had a three- or four-octave range. During performances, he was known for standing still and solitary, and for wearing black clothes, to match his jet black hair and dark sunglasses, which lent an air of mystery to his persona.

From the late 1960s to late 1970s, Orbison was marred by a number of personal tragedies while his record sales declined. He experienced a resurgence in popularity through the success of several cover versions of his songs and the use of his 1963 song “In Dreams” in David Lynch’s film Blue Velvet (1986) and his hit “Oh, Pretty Woman” as the title track to film Pretty Woman in 1990. In 1988, he co-founded the Traveling Wilburys supergroup with George Harrison, Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, and Jeff Lynne. Orbison recorded his last solo album, Mystery Girl, the same year but died of a heart attack shortly thereafter.

His honors include inductions into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in the same year, and the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1989. Rolling Stone placed him at number 37 on their list of the “Greatest Artists of All Time” and number 13 on their list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time’. In 2002, Billboard magazine listed Orbison at number 74 in the Top 600 recording artists. – Wikipedia

Monday 6pm: Across The Tracks – Aretha Franklin

This edition of Across The Tracks features Aretha Franklin Hits and her latest release of hits “Brand New Me” with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer and songwriter. Franklin began her career as a child singing gospel at the church of her father, minister C. L. Franklin’s church. In 1960, at the age of 18, Franklin embarked on a secular career, recording for Columbia Records but only achieving modest success. Following her signing to Atlantic Records in 1967, Franklin achieved commercial acclaim and success with songs such as “Respect”, “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman”, “Spanish Harlem” and “Think”. By the end of the 1960s decade she had gained the title “The Queen of Soul”. Franklin eventually recorded a total of 112 charted singles on Billboard, including 77 Hot 100 entries, 17 top ten pop singles, 100 R&B entries and twenty number-one R&B singles, becoming the most charted female artist in the chart’s history. Franklin also recorded acclaimed albums such as I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You, Lady Soul, Young, Gifted and Black and Amazing Grace before experiencing problems with her record company by the mid-1970s. After her father was shot in 1979, Franklin left Atlantic and signed with Arista Records, finding success with her part in the film The Blues Brothers and with the albums Jump to It and Who’s Zoomin’ Who?. In 1998, Franklin won international acclaim for singing the opera aria “Nessun dorma”, at the Grammys of that year replacing Luciano Pavarotti. Later that same year, she scored her final Top 40 recording with “A Rose Is Still a Rose”. Franklin’s other popular and well known hits include “Rock Steady”, “Think”, “Jump to It”, “Freeway of Love”, “Who’s Zoomin’ Who”, “Chain Of Fools”, “I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)” (with George Michael),and a remake of The Rolling Stones song “Jumpin’ Jack Flash”.

Franklin has won a total of 18 Grammy Awards and is one of the best-selling musical artists of all time, having sold over 75 million records worldwide. Franklin has been honored throughout her career including a 1987 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, in which she became the first female performer to be inducted. She was inducted to the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. In August 2012, Franklin was inducted into the GMA Gospel Music Hall of Fame. Franklin is listed in at least two all-time lists on Rolling Stone magazine, including the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, in which she placed number 9; and the 100 Greatest Singers of All Time, in which she placed number 1. – Wikipedia