In Memoriam: Dolores Mary Eileen O’Riordan (September 6, 1971 – January 15, 2018)

Dolores Mary Eileen O’Riordan (September 6, 1971 – January 15, 2018) was an Irish musician and singer-songwriter. She led the rock band The Cranberries to worldwide success for 13 years before the band took a break starting in 2003, reuniting in 2009.

http://www.tmz.com/2018/01/15/cranberries-dolores-oriordan-dead-dies/er first solo album Are You Listening? was released in May 2007 and was followed up by No Baggage in 2009. O’Riordan is notable for her lilting mezzo-soprano voice, for yodeling and for her strong Limerick accent. She appeared as a judge on RTÉ’s The Voice of Ireland during the 2013/14 season. In April 2014, O’Riordan joined Jetlag (now called D.A.R.K.) and began recording new material. In May 2017, Dolores declared that she had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

While in London, England, for a short recording session, O’Riordan died suddenly on Monday, January 15, 2018 at the age of 46. The cause of death was not immediately made public. – Wikipedia

Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolores_O%27Riordan

In Memoriam: Denise LaSalle (1939 – 2018)

Ora Denise Allen (July 16, 1939 – January 8, 2018), known by the stage name Denise LaSalle, was an American blues and R&B/soul singer, songwriter, and record producer who, since the death of Koko Taylor, had been recognized as the “Queen of the Blues”.

We feature her music 11pm ET on RadioMaxMusic

Her best known song was “Trapped by a Thing Called Love”.

Born near Sidon, Mississippi and raised in Belzoni, she sang in church choirs before moving to Chicago in the early 1960s. She sat in with R&B musicians and wrote songs, influenced by country music as well as the blues, before winning a recording contract with Chess Records in 1967. Her first single, “A Love Reputation” was a modest regional hit.

She established an independent production company, Crajon, with her then husband Bill Jones. Her song “Trapped By A Thing Called Love” (1971) was released on Detroit-based Westbound Records. This reached #1 on the national R&B chart and #13 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song ranked at #85 on the 1971 year-end chart. The RIAA gold disc award was made on November 30, 1971 for a million sales.

She also wrote successful follow-ups, “Now Run And Tell That” and “Man Sized Job” which made #3 and #4 in the R&B Top Ten and also charted in the Hot 100. Her early hits were recorded at the Hi recording studios in Memphis, operated by Willie Mitchell, using the cream of southern session players. She continued to have hits on Westbound and then on ABC Records through the mid-1970s, including “Love Me Right” (#10 R&B, #80 pop) She continued to produce and perform live. Her co-penned song, “Married, But Not to Each Other” (#16 R&B) was included in the 1979 The Best of Barbara Mandrell, compilation album.

In the early 1980s, she signed as a singer and songwriter with Malaco Records, for whom she released a string of critically acclaimed albums over more than 20 years, starting with Lady in the Street (1983) and Right Place, Right Time (1984). Both albums became successful among soul blues, R&B and soul fans and on urban radio stations. In 1985, she enjoyed her only recognition in the UK Singles Chart, when her cover version of Rockin’ Sidney’s “My Toot Toot” reached #6.

LaSalle appeared at the 1984 and 1993 versions of the Long Beach Blues Festival, and also in 1993, she performed at the San Francisco Blues Festival. Her album Smokin’ In Bed (1997) sold well. After more than a decade away, when she recorded three albums with small Memphis-based soul-blues label, Ecko, she returned to Malaco for her 2010 outing called “24 Hour Woman”. She continues to work as a live performer, particularly at festivals, and more recently has branched out into the gospel genre. In 2011, she was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame.

LaSalle lived with her husband, James E. Wolfe, in Jackson, Tennessee, where she opened a restaurant called Blues Legend Café. The restaurant was located at 436 E. Main Street, but has since closed.

In 2013 and 2014, LaSalle was nominated for a Blues Music Award in the ‘Soul Blues Female Artist’ category. On June 6, 2015, LaSalle was inducted into the Rhythm and Blues Music Hall of Fame.

After suffering from heart problems, and complications from a fall resulting in her right leg being amputated, LaSalle died on January 8, 2018, at the age of 78. – Wikipedia

In Memoriam: Ray Thomas (1941 – 2018)

Raymond Thomas (29 December 1941 – 4 January 2018) was an English musician, best known as a flautist, singer and composer in the rock band, The Moody Blues.

Moody Blues star Ray Thomas dies aged suddenly aged 76

Raymond Thomas (29 December 1941 – 4 January 2018) was an English musician, best known as a flautist, singer and composer in the rock band, The Moody Blues. Thomas died from prostate cancer at this home in Surrey, UK.

Thomas was born in Stourport-on-Severn, England, of Welsh descent.

In the 1960s Thomas joined the Birmingham Youth Choir then began singing with various Birmingham blues and soul groups including The Saints and Sinners and The Ramblers. Taking up the harmonica he started a band, El Riot and the Rebels, with bass guitarist John Lodge. After a couple of years their friend Mike Pinder joined as keyboardist. El Riot and the Rebels once opened for The Beatles in Tenbury Wells; Thomas and Pinder were later in a band called Krew Cats, formed in 1963, who played in Hamburg and other places in northern Germany.

In October 2014, Thomas posted this statement on his website: “After the tragic death of Alvin Stardust and the brave response to Prostate Awareness by his widow, Julie, in following up on what Alvin had intended to say about the disease, I have decided to help in some small way. I was diagnosed in September 2013 with prostate cancer. My cancer was in-operable but I have a fantastic doctor who immediately started me on a new treatment that has had 90% success rate. The cancer is being held in remission but I’ll be receiving this treatment for the rest of my life. I have four close friends who have all endured some kind of surgery or treatment for this cancer and all are doing well. While I don’t like to talk publicly about my health problems, after Alvin’s death, I decided it was time I spoke out. A cancer diagnosis can shake your world and your family’s but if caught in time it can be cured or held in remission. I urge all males to get tested NOW. Don’t put it off by thinking it won’t happen to me. It needs to be caught early. It’s only a blood test – a few minutes out your day to save yourself from this disease. Love and God Bless, Ray.” – Wikipedia

In Memoriam: Pat DiNizio (1955 – 2017)

Pat DiNizio (October 12, 1955 – December 12, 2017) was the lead singer, songwriter, and member of the band The Smithereens, which he formed in 1980 with Jim Babjak, Dennis Diken and Mike Mesaros, from Carteret, New Jersey.

A native of Scotch Plains, New Jersey, he released a number of solo albums, Sounds and Songs (1997), This is Pat DiNizio, a collection of cover songs arranged for piano and vocals (2006), Revolutions (2 CDs plus 1 DVD, limited edition of 300 copies, 2006), Pat DiNizio (2007), and Pat DiNizio/Buddy Holly (2008). An expanded 2-CD version of This is Pat DiNizio was issued in 2011.

In 2000, DiNizio made an unsuccessful run for the New Jersey seat of the United States Senate, running on the Reform Party ticket. He finished 4th with 19,312 votes (0.64%). The campaign was chronicled in the 2001 documentary film Mr. Smithereen Goes to Washington.

The same year, he launched the “Living Room Tour,” a five-month jaunt where he performed solo, by request only, in the homes of fans. The tour was a success, and he occasionally did similar concerts for a nominal fee.

In 2001, DiNizio was one of the first musicians to throw his support behind XM Satellite Radio, becoming host and program director for the XM Radio Unsigned station. He was also an inaugural member of the Independent Music Awards’ judging panel to support independent artists.

In 2006, he was the focus of 7th Inning Stretch, an ESPN2 reality special. The special focused on DiNizio’s recovery from a “life-threatening and debilitating nervous disorder” by training and attempting to try out for a Minor League Baseball team (The Somerset Patriots), along with tales of baseball folklore from other musicians such as Joan Jett, Gene Simmons, and Bruce Springsteen.

DiNizio also released an audio book, Confessions Of A Rock Star, and continued to perform both solo acoustic shows and with The Smithereens. From November 2011 to June 2012, DiNizio presented a condensed, live adaptation of the book (with storytelling and full band accompaniment) in nightly performances at the Riviera Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas.

DiNizio died on December 12, 2017. According to bandmates, his health declined following a series of health issues that began in 2015 after a pair of falls that resulted in nerve damage which limited the use of his right hand and arm.  Wikipedia

In Memoriam: David Cassidy (1950 – 2017)

(Washington Post) David Cassidy, an actor and singer who became a teeny-bopper heartthrob in the early 1970s, starring as shaggy-haired guitarist Keith Partridge on the musical sitcom “The Partridge Family,” died Nov. 21 at a hospital near Fort Lauderdale, Fla. He was 67.

His publicist, Jo-Ann Geffen, told the Associated Press on Saturday that he was hospitalized with liver and kidney failure. Mr. Cassidy announced earlier this year that he was suffering from dementia and would stop touring.

At the height of his popularity, Mr. Cassidy commanded a rabid fan base that drew comparisons to those of Elvis Presley and the Beatles, with the New York Times reporting that after a 21-year-old Mr. Cassidy’s gallbladder was removed in 1971, fans called for the singer’s gallstones to be covered in bronze and sold alongside clippings of his hair.

Mr. Cassidy’s entrails remained off the market, but for several years his likeness was emblazoned on posters, push-out cards, coloring books and lunchboxes, as the band he led on television — the Partridge Family, a true family outfit that featured his stepmother Shirley Jones — became one of the decade’s defining pop music acts, beloved by a mostly female audience and derided by critics who heard only bubble-gum blandness.

Cassidy announced on February 20, 2017, that he is living with non-Alzheimer’s dementia, the condition that his mother suffered from at the end of her life. He retired from performing in early 2017 when the condition became noticeable during a performance in which he forgot lyrics and otherwise struggled.

On November 18, 2017, it was announced that Cassidy had been hospitalized suffering from liver and kidney failure, and was critically ill in a medically induced coma. He was out of the coma two days later, but remained in critical but stable condition, with doctors hoping to keep him stable until a liver becomes available for transplant. Cassidy passed away the following day, aged 67 years.