In Memoriam: Gregg Allman (December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017)

When Gregg Allman began singing at Southern bars and clubs in the mid-1960s with his guitarist brother Duane, his untrained voice was “like a cross between Hank Williams with the croup and James Brown with no lips,” he later quipped.

His vocals bore a rough-edged rasp that Mr. Allman gradually refined into one of the most distinctive sounds in American music: a blend of Tennessee twang, traditional soul and gospel, and a hard-won sense of the blues.

Mr. Allman, 69, who died May 27 at his home in Savannah, Ga., was for decades the frontman of the Allman Brothers Band, a pioneering but conflict-ridden blues-rock collective that modeled its guitar runs on the melodies of Brahms and performed instrumental jams inspired by the improvisational jazz greats Miles Davis and John Coltrane.

His family announced the death on Mr. Allman’s official website but did not provide other details. Mr. Allman had a liver transplant in 2010 and had struggled with an irregular heartbeat, among other health problems in recent years. He recently began canceling concerts.

Mr. Allman released a half-dozen albums as a solo artist but was best known for his work with the Allman Brothers Band, which Duane Allman formed in 1969. The elder Allman, a preternaturally gifted slide guitarist, envisioned a lineup of two drummers and two guitarists, anchored by two Allmans — an outfit capable of doubling the musical possibilities and raw sonic power of a more traditional rock group. lick here to read more>

Gregory LeNoir “Gregg” Allman (December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017) was an American musician, singer and songwriter.

He is best known for performing in the Allman Brothers Band. He was born and spent much of his childhood in Nashville, Tennessee, before relocating to Daytona Beach, Florida. He and his brother, Duane Allman, developed an interest in music in their teens, and began performing in the Allman Joys in the mid-1960s. In 1967, they relocated to Los Angeles and were renamed the Hour Glass, releasing two albums for Liberty Records. In 1969, he and Duane regrouped to form the Allman Brothers Band, which settled in Macon, Georgia.

The Allman Brothers Band began to reach mainstream success by the early 1970s, with their live album At Fillmore East representing a commercial and artistic breakthrough. Shortly thereafter, Duane was killed in a motorcycle crash in 1971. The following year, the band’s bassist, Berry Oakley was also killed in a motorcycle accident very close to the location of Duane’s wreck. Their 1973 album Brothers and Sisters became their biggest hit, and Allman pursued a solo career afterward, releasing his debut album, Laid Back the same year. Internal turmoil took over the group, leading to a 1975 breakup. Allman was married to pop star Cher for the rest of the decade, while he continued his solo career with the Gregg Allman Band. After a brief Allman Brothers reunion and a decade of little activity, he reached an unexpected peak with the hit single “I’m No Angel” in 1987. After two more solo albums, the Allman Brothers reformed for a third and final time in 1989, and continued performing until 2014. He released his most recent solo album, Low Country Blues, in 2011, and his next, Southern Blood, is set to be released in 2017.

For his work in music, Allman was referred to as a Southern rock pioneer and received numerous awards, including several Grammys; he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. His distinctive voice placed him in 70th place in the Rolling Stone list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time”. Allman released an autobiography, My Cross to Bear, in 2012. – Wikipedia

Artist Countdown: Allman Brothers Band Top 25 – 6pm ET @allmanbrothers

Allman Brothers BandThe Allman Brothers Band is an American rock/blues band once based in Macon, Georgia. The band was formed in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1969 by brothers Duane Allman (slide guitar and lead guitar) and Gregg Allman (vocals, organ, songwriting), plus Dickey Betts (lead guitar, vocals, songwriting), Berry Oakley (bass guitar), Butch Trucks (drums), and Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson (drums). While the band has been called the principal architects of Southern rock, they also incorporate elements of blues, jazz, and country music, and their live shows have jam band-style improvisation and instrumentals.

The band achieved its artistic and commercial breakthrough in 1971 with the release of At Fillmore East, featuring extended renderings of their songs “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” and “Whipping Post” and often considered one of the best live albums ever made. George Kimball of Rolling Stone magazine hailed them as “the best damn rock and roll band this country has produced in the past five years.” A few months later, group leader Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle accident. The group survived that and the death of bassist Oakley in another motorcycle accident a year later; with replacement members Chuck Leavell and Lamar Williams, the Allman Brothers Band achieved its peak commercial success in 1973 with the album Brothers and Sisters and the hit single “Ramblin’ Man”. Internal turmoil overtook the band soon after; the group dissolved in 1976, reformed briefly at the end of the decade with additional personnel changes, and dissolved again in 1982.

In 1989, the group reformed with some new members and has been recording and touring since. A series of personnel changes in the late 1990s was capped by the departure of Betts. The group found stability during the 2000s with bassist Oteil Burbridge and guitarists Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks (the nephew of their drummer), and became renowned for their month-long string of shows in New York City each spring. The band has been awarded eleven gold and five platinum albums between 1971 and 2005 and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. Rolling Stone ranked them 52nd on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time in 2004. (Source: Wikipedia)

1 Straight from the Heart
2 Good Clean Fun
3 Ramblin’ Man
4 No One to Run With
5 Seven Turns
6 It Ain’t Over Yet
7 Crazy Love
8 Back Where It All Begins
9 Firing Line
10 Angeline
11 Jessica
12 Nevertheless
13 Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More
14 Louisiana Lou and Three Card Monty John
15 Melissa
16 One Way Out
17 Revival
18 Can’t Take It With You
19 Black Hearted Woman
20 Mystery Woman
21 Two Rights
22 Rockin’ Horse
23 Let Me Ride
24 Little Martha
25 Midnight Rider

Feature Year: 1974 – 9am ET

1974January 3 – Bob Dylan and The Band kick off their 40-date concert tour at Chicago Stadium. It’s Dylan’s first time on the road since 1966.
January 17 – Joni Mitchell releases her monumental album Court and Spark, supported by the single “Help Me” reaching the highest moment of commercial success. Dino Martin, singer and son of Dean Martin, is arrested on suspicion of possession and sale of two machine guns.
February 10 – record producer Phil Spector is badly injured in a car accident. Details of the accident are kept secret.
February 12 – New York’s rock club, Bottom Line, opens in Greenwich Village. The first headlining act is Dr. John.
February 14 – The Captain & Tennille are married in Virginia City, Nevada.
February 16 – Two years of litigation between Grand Funk and former manager Terry Knight are finally resolved. The band gets the rights to its name but Knight wins a cash settlement.
February 18 – Yes sells out the first of two nights at Madison Square Garden, without a bit of advertising for the show. Kiss releases their self-titled debut album.
February 19 – The first American Music Awards are broadcast on ABC, two weeks before the Grammys.
February 20 – Cher files for divorce from her husband of 10 years, Sonny Bono.
March 12 – John Lennon is involved in an altercation with a photographer outside The Troubadour in Los Angeles, California. Lennon and friend Harry Nilsson have been heckling comedian Tommy Smothers and are forced to leave the club.
March 16 – Country music’s Grand Ole Opry moves to a new location at the Opryland USA theme park in Nashville, Tennessee
March 30 – The Ramones play their first concert at the Performance Studio in New York.
April 5 – Van Halen play their first gig on the Sunset Strip in Hollywood at Gazzarri’s.
April 6 – 200,000 music fans attend The California Jam rock festival. Artists performing at the event include Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Black Oak Arkansas, and the Eagles. Swedish group ABBA wins the 19th Eurovision Song Contest in The Dome, Brighton, England, with the song “Waterloo”, kickstarting their stellar international career.
April 14 – Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones, a concert movie filmed during the band’s 1972 North American Tour, premieres at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York.
April 16 – Queen play their first North American concert, opening for Mott the Hoople in Denver, Colorado.
April 25 – Pam Morrison, Jim Morrison’s widow, is found dead in her Hollywood apartment from an apparent heroin overdose.
May 7 – Led Zeppelin announces their new record label, Swan Song Records, with a lavish party at The Four Seasons Hotel in New York.
May 25 – Twenty years after it was recorded, “Rock Around the Clock” by Bill Haley and His Comets returns to the Billboard Top 40, after it gains renewed popularity from its use in the film American Graffiti and the TV series Happy Days.
May 28 – Experimental orchestra, the Portsmouth Sinfonia, plays a concert at the Royal Albert Hall, with its regular conductor John Farley. The performers included Michael Nyman and Brian Eno.
June 5 – Patti Smith records “Hey Joe”, her debut single which arguably becomes the first punk rock single when released in August.
June 14 – David Bowie launches his Diamond Dogs tour at the Montreal Forum. One year previously Bowie had announced he was retiring from touring as Ziggy Stardust.
July 4 – Barry White marries Love Unlimited lead singer Glodean James.
July 19-21 – Ozark Music Festival is held in Sedalia, Missouri with a crowd estimated between 100,000 to 350,000 people.
July 20 – The first Knebworth Concert is held in England, headlined by The Allman Brothers Band.
July 29 – Having performed at two sold-out concerts at the London Palladium, ‘Mama’ Cass Elliot dies in her sleep after suffering a heart attack in a Mayfair flat in London, aged 32. Neil Peart officially joins Rush.
August 7 – Peter Wolf, lead singer of The J. Geils Band, marries actress Faye Dunaway.
August 17 – Ramones make their CBGB debut. The venue would help establish their place at the forefront of punk rock.
September 15 – Gary Thain of Uriah Heep is shocked on stage at the Moody Coliseum in Dallas, Texas and is seriously injured.
October 5 – AC/DC performs its first official show with Bon Scott as its new lead singer.
October 18 – Al Green is attacked in the shower by a girlfriend. She scalds his body with a pan of boiling grits and commits suicide a few moments later.
November 2 – George Harrison launches his “George Harrison & Friends North American Tour” in Vancouver. It’s Harrison’s first tour since the Beatles North American Tour of 1966.
November 21 – Wilson Pickett is arrested in Andes, New York after allegedly firing a bullet through the door of a hotel room he was staying at while on a hunting trip with The Isley Brothers.
November 28 – John Lennon joins Elton John on stage at Madison Square Garden for three songs. It would be Lennon’s last stage performance.
December 12 – Mick Taylor leaves The Rolling Stones after 6 years.
December 31 – Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks join Fleetwood Mac. The third annual New Year’s Rockin’ Eve, moving this year from NBC to ABC, is aired with performances by Herbie Hancock, The Beach Boys, Chicago, Olivia Newton-John and The Doobie Brothers.

Feature Year: 1974 9am ET

1974January 3 – Bob Dylan and The Band kick off their 40-date concert tour at Chicago Stadium. It’s Dylan’s first time on the road since 1966.
January 17 – Joni Mitchell releases her monumental album Court and Spark, supported by the single “Help Me” reaching the highest moment of commercial success.  Dino Martin, singer and son of Dean Martin, is arrested on suspicion of possession and sale of two machine guns.
February 10 – record producer Phil Spector is badly injured in a car accident. Details of the accident are kept secret.
February 12 – New York’s rock club, Bottom Line, opens in Greenwich Village. The first headlining act is Dr. John.
February 14 – The Captain & Tennille are married in Virginia City, Nevada.
February 16 – Two years of litigation between Grand Funk and former manager Terry Knight are finally resolved. The band gets the rights to its name but Knight wins a cash settlement.
February 18 – Yes sells out the first of two nights at Madison Square Garden, without a bit of advertising for the show.  Kiss releases their self-titled debut album.
February 19 – The first American Music Awards are broadcast on ABC, two weeks before the Grammys.
February 20 – Cher files for divorce from her husband of 10 years, Sonny Bono.
March 12 – John Lennon is involved in an altercation with a photographer outside The Troubadour in Los Angeles, California. Lennon and friend Harry Nilsson have been heckling comedian Tommy Smothers and are forced to leave the club.
March 16 – Country music’s Grand Ole Opry moves to a new location at the Opryland USA theme park in Nashville, Tennessee
March 30 – The Ramones play their first concert at the Performance Studio in New York.
April 5 – Van Halen play their first gig on the Sunset Strip in Hollywood at Gazzarri’s.
April 6 – 200,000 music fans attend The California Jam rock festival. Artists performing at the event include Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Black Oak Arkansas, and the Eagles.  Swedish group ABBA wins the 19th Eurovision Song Contest in The Dome, Brighton, England, with the song “Waterloo”, kickstarting their stellar international career.
April 14 – Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones, a concert movie filmed during the band’s 1972 North American Tour, premieres at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York.
April 16 – Queen play their first North American concert, opening for Mott the Hoople in Denver, Colorado.
April 25 – Pam Morrison, Jim Morrison’s widow, is found dead in her Hollywood apartment from an apparent heroin overdose.
May 7 – Led Zeppelin announces their new record label, Swan Song Records, with a lavish party at The Four Seasons Hotel in New York.
May 25 – Twenty years after it was recorded, “Rock Around the Clock” by Bill Haley and His Comets returns to the Billboard Top 40, after it gains renewed popularity from its use in the film American Graffiti and the TV series Happy Days.
May 28 – Experimental orchestra, the Portsmouth Sinfonia, plays a concert at the Royal Albert Hall, with its regular conductor John Farley. The performers included Michael Nyman and Brian Eno.
June 5 – Patti Smith records “Hey Joe”, her debut single which arguably becomes the first punk rock single when released in August.
June 14 – David Bowie launches his Diamond Dogs tour at the Montreal Forum. One year previously Bowie had announced he was retiring from touring as Ziggy Stardust.
July 4 – Barry White marries Love Unlimited lead singer Glodean James.
July 19-21 – Ozark Music Festival is held in Sedalia, Missouri with a crowd estimated between 100,000 to 350,000 people.
July 20 – The first Knebworth Concert is held in England, headlined by The Allman Brothers Band.
July 29 – Having performed at two sold-out concerts at the London Palladium, ‘Mama’ Cass Elliot dies in her sleep after suffering a heart attack in a Mayfair flat in London, aged 32.  Neil Peart officially joins Rush.
August 7 – Peter Wolf, lead singer of The J. Geils Band, marries actress Faye Dunaway.
August 17 – Ramones make their CBGB debut. The venue would help establish their place at the forefront of punk rock.
September 15 – Gary Thain of Uriah Heep is shocked on stage at the Moody Coliseum in Dallas, Texas and is seriously injured.
October 5 – AC/DC performs its first official show with Bon Scott as its new lead singer.
October 18 – Al Green is attacked in the shower by a girlfriend. She scalds his body with a pan of boiling grits and commits suicide a few moments later.
November 2 – George Harrison launches his “George Harrison & Friends North American Tour” in Vancouver. It’s Harrison’s first tour since the Beatles North American Tour of 1966.
November 21 – Wilson Pickett is arrested in Andes, New York after allegedly firing a bullet through the door of a hotel room he was staying at while on a hunting trip with The Isley Brothers.
November 28 – John Lennon joins Elton John on stage at Madison Square Garden for three songs. It would be Lennon’s last stage performance.
December 12 – Mick Taylor leaves The Rolling Stones after 6 years.
December 31 – Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks join Fleetwood Mac. 

Feature Year: 1973 9am ET

1973January 8 – British Rail authorities restrict Pipe Major Gordon Speirs to playing his bagpipes just one minute in every fifteen on Liverpool Street station, London, on grounds that his playing (part of a holiday campaign by the Scottish Tourist Board) “interferes with station business”.[1]
January 9 – Mick Jagger’s request for a Japanese visa is rejected on account of a 1969 drug conviction, putting an abrupt end to The Rolling Stones’ plans to perform in Japan during their forthcoming tour.
January 14
Elvis Presley’s Aloha From Hawaii Via Satellite television special is broadcast in over 40 countries around the world.
Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh is arrested for drug possession at his Marin County home.
January 18 – The Rolling Stones’ benefit concert for Nicaraguan earthquake victims raises over $350,000. On December 22, 1972, an earthquake destroyed Managua, the capital of Nicaragua.
January 21 – The Rolling Stones open their Pacific tour of Hawaii, Australia and New Zealand in Honolulu, Hawaii.
January 30 – Kiss perform their first concert, at the Coventry Club in Queens.
February 2 – The Midnight Special makes its debut as a regular series on NBC. Helen Reddy is the featured artist.
February 14 – David Bowie collapses from exhaustion after a performance at New York’s Madison Square Garden.
February 18 – The King Biscuit Flower Hour is first broadcast with performances by Blood, Sweat & Tears, The Mahavishnu Orchestra, and new artist Bruce Springsteen.
March 1
Leonard Bernstein conducts Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky‘s Violin Concerto for the first time in his career, with soloist Isaac Stern and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra.
The Joffrey Ballet’s Deuce Coupe Ballet opens. The ballet is set entirely to music by The Beach Boys.
Pink Floyd releases The Dark Side of the Moon, which goes on to become one of the best-selling albums of all time. The album debuts on the Billboard 200 on March 17, reaches #1 on April 28, and eventually logs the all-time record of 741 weeks on that chart.
March 5 – Jimi Hendrix’s former personal manager, Michael Jeffery, is killed in a plane crash. Jeffery was travelling from Majorca to England. All passengers on board the plane were killed.
March 6 – The New York Office of the US Immigration Department cancels John Lennon’s visa extension five days after granting it.
March 7 – The director of talent acquisition at Columbia Records, John H. Hammond, suffers a non-fatal heart attack following a performance by one of his most recent finds, Bruce Springsteen.
March 8 – Paul McCartney is fined $240 after pleading guilty to charges of growing marijuana outside his Scottish farm.
March 14 – The singers Stephen Stills and Véronique Sanson are married near Guildford, England.
March 24 – Lou Reed is bitten on the buttocks by a fan during a concert in Buffalo, New York.
April 2 – Capitol Records releases two collections of The Beatles’ greatest hits, The Beatles 1962-1966 and The Beatles 1967-1970 (commonly referred to as the “Red Album” and the “Blue Album”, respectively).
April 7 – In Luxembourg, the 18th Eurovision Song Contest is won by Luxembourg for the second consecutive year, this time with “Tu te reconnaîtras”, sung by Anne-Marie David. Spain finish in second place with “Eres Tú”, sung by Mocedades; the United Kingdom finish third with Cliff Richard singing “Power to All Our Friends”. The top three placed songs become international hits.
April 8 – Opening of the first La Rochelle Festival of Contemporary Music, under the direction of Claude Samuel. Featured composers include Karlheinz Stockhausen and Iannis Xenakis
April 15 – Tenth Royan Festival of International Contemporary Art begins, including concerts featuring music by Jean Barraqué and Horațiu Rădulescu, amongst others.
April 16 – Paul McCartney’s first solo television special, James Paul McCartney, airs on ABC. The special includes performances by McCartney and Wings.
April 18 – Violinist Jascha Heifetz deposits parts from his prized Guarnerius violin in the newly poured wet concrete of the foundation for the new Virginia Ramo Hall of Music, under construction at the University of Southern California, in order to ensure the building will be “in tune”, and to bring luck.
May 4 – July 29 – Led Zeppelin embarks on a tour of the United States, during which they set the record for highest attendance for a concert, 56,800, at the Tampa Stadium in Tampa, Florida. The record was previously held by The Beatles. Performances for the movie The Song Remains the Same are also filmed.
May 9 – Mick Jagger adds $150,000 of his own money to the $350,000 raised by The Rolling Stones’ January 18 benefit concert for the victims of the Nicaraguan earthquake.
May 12 – David Bowie is the first rock artist to perform at Earls Court Exhibition Centre.
May 13 – Daniel Barenboim collapses with a gastric upset during a concert at the Brighton Festival, but later had sufficiently recovered to be driven home.
May 23 – Don Robey sells Duke Records, Peacock Records and Backbeat Records to ABC Dunhill Records.
May 25 – Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells becomes the first release on Richard Branson’s newly-launched Virgin label.
June 4 – Ronnie Lane plays his last show with Faces at the Edmonton Sundown in London. Lane had informed the band three weeks earlier that he was quitting.
June 15 – The first Istanbul International Music Festival opens.
June 16 – Benjamin Britten’s opera Death in Venice, receives its première at Snape Maltings.
June 29 – The Scorpions play their first gig with Uli Roth at a festival in Vechta. Roth was originally intended as a temporary replacement for Michael Schenker, who had just been snapped up by U.F.O. earlier in the month.
June 30 – Ian Gillan quits Deep Purple.
July 1 – Slade play a sell-out Earls Court in London after two number one singles this year.
July 3 – David Bowie ‘retires’ his stage persona Ziggy Stardust in front of a shocked audience at the Hammersmith Odeon at the end of his British tour.
July 4 – Slade drummer Don Powell is critically injured in a car crash in Wolverhampton; his 20-year-old girlfriend is killed. With his life in danger, the band’s future is left in the balance. Powell recovered after surgery, and was able to join the band ten weeks later in New York, to record “Merry Xmas Everybody”.
July 13 – The Everly Brothers break up.Queen releases their debut album.
July 15 – Ray Davies of The Kinks makes an emotional outburst during a performance at White City Stadium, announcing he is quitting the group. He later recants the statement.
July 28 – Summer Jam at Watkins Glen rock festival is attended by 600,000, who see The Allman Brothers Band, The Band, and the Grateful Dead.
July 30 – Soviet officials grant permission for Gennadi Rozhdestvensky to accept a three-year appointment as chief conductor of the Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, the first time a Soviet orchestra conductor has been allowed to take up such a position outside of the Eastern Bloc.[2]
August 6 – Stevie Wonder is seriously injured in a car accident outside Durham, North Carolina, spending the next four days in a coma.
August 20 – The London Symphony Orchestra becomes the first British orchestra to take part in the Salzburg Festival.
August 25 – The Allman Brothers nearly suffer another tragedy when Butch Trucks crashes his car near Macon, Georgia, not far from where Duane Allman was killed two years earlier. Trucks survives with only a broken leg.
September 1 – The Rolling Stones open their European tour in Vienna, Austria.
September 20 – Jim Croce, Maury Muehleisen and four others die in a plane crash in Louisiana.
September 22 – Benita Valente makes her debut with the Metropolitan Opera, singing Pamina in The Magic Flute.
September 23 – The Roxy Theatre opens in West Hollywood, California.
September 27 – Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert premieres on syndicated television with a performance by The Rolling Stones.
October 6 – Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band become the national brass-band champions of Great Britain by defeating 18 other bands at the Albert Hall in London.[3]
October 12 – Genesis releases their 5th studio album Selling England by the Pound, one of there most commercially successful albums
October 13 – Family play their last concert at De Montfort Hall at Leicester Polytechnic (now De Montfort University) before splitting up for good. A farewell party at a local Holiday Inn after the show ends in a good-natured melee, with people jumping in or pushed into the motel pool.
October 17 – The 1973 oil crisis begins, causing shortages of the vinyl needed to manufacture records. A number of new albums are either delayed or only available in limited quantities until after the holiday season.
October 19 – The Who release Quadrophenia, one of their most critically acclaimed albums.
October 20 – Queen Elizabeth II opens Sydney Opera House.
November 1 – Kiss becomes the first act signed to Neil Bogart’s new label, Casablanca Records.
November 5 – Cellist Jacqueline du Pré is forced to retire because she has been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.[4]
November 7 – Harold Holt Ltd., agent for Jacqueline du Pré, deny newspaper reports that she will never perform again, while at the same time confirming she has been diagnosed with “a mild case of multiple sclerosis” and has no definite plans for future performances.[5]
November 20 – The Who open their Quadrophenia US tour with a concert at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, but drummer Keith Moon passes out and has to be carried off the stage. 19-year old fan Scot Halpin is selected from the audience to finish the show.
December 3 – CBGB music club opens in Manhattan.
December 15 – Jermaine Jackson marries Hazel Gordy, daughter of Motown Records executive Barry Gordy.
December 25 – Universal Pictures releases The Sting, reviving interest in the ragtime music of Scott Joplin.
December 31
Brothers Malcolm and Angus Young perform under the name AC/DC at the former Sydney nightclub ‘Chequers’ for their New Year’s Eve party.
The second annual New Year’s Rockin’ Eve airs on NBC, with performances by Tower of Power, Billy Preston and The Pointer Sisters.
(Source: Wikipedia)

 

Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013 Hits Theatres

Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013”

Brings World’s Greatest Guitar Stars

To Cinemas This Summer

 NCM Fathom Events and Crossroad Concerts LLC Present the

All-Star Benefit Concert in Select U.S. Theaters on Aug. 13

 

13-FEMK-252_Crossroads13_Poster_FINAL2Bringing the ultimate guitar concert featuring the most legendary guitarists in the world to select U.S. movie theaters, NCM Fathom Events and Crossroad Concerts LLC present “Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013 on Tuesday, Aug. 13 at 7:30 p.m. (local time). This special, one-night event will feature the best performances and backstage access from Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival pre-recorded over two nights at Madison Square Garden this past April. Tickets for the live concert sold out within minutes of going on sale, but fans can experience one of the hottest events of the year from their local theater as Clapton gathers his most respected colleagues in the music industry for a jam session. The live concert and portions from the cinema event benefit the Crossroads Centre, a treatment and education facility for chemically dependent people, based in Antigua and founded by Clapton.

Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013 will be presented in nearly 500 select movie theaters around the country through NCM’s exclusive Digital Broadcast Network. Tickets are available at participating theater box offices and online at www.FathomEvents.com. For a complete list of theater locations and prices, visit the NCM Fathom Events website (theaters and participants are subject to change).

Musicians featured in the cinema event include the Allman Brothers Band, Blake Mills, Booker T., Buddy Guy, Derek Trucks, Doyle Bramhall II, Eric Clapton, Gary Clark Jr., Gregg Allman, Jeff Beck, John Mayer, Keith Richards, Keith Urban, Los Lobos, Robert Cray, Sonny Landreth, Vince Gill and Warren Haynes.

Since 2004, the Crossroads Guitar Festival has taken place every three years and the 2013 edition is the fourth in the series.A mix of sultry blues, classic rock and country jams, the festival offers a wide sampling of legendary guitarists and their greatest hits, where anything can unfold onstage at any time.  Since its inception, Clapton’s vision for the Crossroads Guitar Festival has been to create an event where his friends and contemporaries can have fun and perform together for the benefit of a good cause.

“NCM Fathom Events is thrilled to bring audiences the concert event of the summer as Eric Clapton and the world’s best guitarists combine for an unforgettable night in cinemas across the country,” said Dan Diamond, senior vice president of Business Development of NCM Fathom. “The Clapton Crossroads Guitar Festival has long been one of the premiere events in music, and communities of fans nationwide will enjoy the ultimate concert experience on the big screen with amazing sound and front row seats.”

Tickets are on sale for the concert film experience featuring Eric Clapton and his most respected colleagues including Allman Brothers Band, Blake Mills, Booker T., Buddy Guy, Derek Trucks, Doyle Bramhall II, Eric Clapton, Gary Clark Jr., Gregg Allman, Jeff Beck, John Mayer, Keith Richards, Keith Urban, Los Lobos, Robert Cray, Sonny Landreth, Vince Gill and Warren Haynes.

View Trailer Here

Purchase Tickets Here

 

Artist Countdown: Montgomery Gentry Top 30 Hits – 2pm ET

montgentyMontgomery Gentry is an American country music duo composed of vocalists Eddie Montgomery and Troy Gentry, both natives of Kentucky. The two began performing in the 1990s as part of two different bands with Montgomery’s brother, John Michael Montgomery. Although Gentry won a talent contest in 1994, he reunited with Eddie Montgomery after Gentry was unable to find a solo record deal, and Montgomery Gentry was founded in 1999. The duo is known for its Southern rock influences, and has collaborated with Charlie Daniels, Toby Keith, Five for Fighting and members of The Allman Brothers Band.

Montgomery Gentry released six studio albums for Columbia Records’ Nashville division: Tattoos & Scars (1999), Carrying On (2001), My Town (2002), You Do Your Thing (2004), Some People Change (2006), and Back When I Knew It All (2008) and a Greatest Hits package. These albums have produced more than twenty chart singles for the duo on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, including the number 1 hits “If You Ever Stop Loving Me“, “Something to Be Proud Of”, “Lucky Man”, “Back When I Knew It All” and “Roll with Me”. Ten more of their songs have reached top 10 on the country charts, including the number 3 hit “Gone”, the most played country song by a duo in 2005. Tattoos & Scars, My Town and You Do Your Thing are all certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. In 1999, they were awarded Favorite New Artist—Country at the American Music Awards. Both the Academy of Country Music and Country Music Association named them Duo of the Year in 2000, an award for which they have been nominated by both associations in every year since. In 2009, they were inducted into the Grand Ole Opry.

After a studio album titled Freedom and extended play titled Hits and More were both shelved, Montgomery Gentry left Columbia in 2010 and signed with Average Joes Entertainment. In October 2011, the duo released Rebels on the Run, followed by the extended play Friends And Family in October 2012. -Wikipedia

1 Lonely and Gone
2 Hillbilly Shoes
3 Roll with Me
4 Daddy Won’t Sell the Farm
5 One in Every Crowd
6 If You Ever Stop Loving Me
7 She Couldn’t Change Me
8 Something to Be Proud Of
9 My Town
10 Back When I Knew It All
11 Hell Yeah
12 Speed
13 Lucky Man
14 Gone
15 What Do Ya Think About That
16 Some People Change
17 She Don’t Tell Me To
18 Where I Come From
19 You Do Your Thing
20 Cold One Comin’ On
21 Long Line of Losers
22 Self Made Man
23 All Night Long (with Charlie Daniels)
24 While You’re Still Young
25 I’ll Keep the Kids
26 Oughta Be More Songs About That
27 So Called Life
28 Didn’t I
29 Ain’t Out of The Woods
30 Tattoos & Scars