Tuesday 9pm: Feature Artist – Ramones

Ramones were an American punk rock band that formed in the New York City neighborhood of Forest Hills, Queens, in 1974. They are often cited as the first band to define the punk rock sound. Despite achieving only limited commercial success, the band was vastly influential in both the United States and the United Kingdom, inspiring also the emergence of hardcore punk, pop punk, and alternative rock.

All of the band members adopted pseudonyms ending with the surname “Ramone”, although none of them were related. They performed 2,263 concerts, touring virtually nonstop for 22 years.In 1996, after a tour with the Lollapalooza music festival, the band played a farewell concert and disbanded. By 2014, all four of the band’s original members had died – lead singer Joey Ramone (1951–2001), bass guitarist Dee Dee Ramone (1951–2002), guitarist Johnny Ramone (1948–2004) and drummer Tommy Ramone (1949–2014).

Recognition of the band’s importance built over the years, and they are now mentioned in many assessments of all-time great rock music, such as number 26 in the Rolling Stone magazine list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” and number 17 in VH1’s “100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock”. In 2002, the Ramones were ranked the second-greatest band of all time by Spin magazine, trailing only the Beatles. On March 18, 2002, the original four members and Tommy’s replacement on drums, Marky Ramone, were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on their first year of eligibility. In 2011, the group was awarded a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

John William Cummings (October 8, 1948 – September 15, 2004), known professionally as Johnny Ramone, was an American guitarist and songwriter, best known for being the guitarist for the punk rock band the Ramones. He was a founding member of the band, and remained a member throughout the band’s entire career. He died from prostate cancer on September 15, 2004.

Johnny Ramone married his wife Linda in 1984. She had originally dated Joey Ramone but left him for Johnny. Joey and Johnny continued to tour as the Ramones after this, but their relationship worsened and they stopped talking to each other,even when Joey was bed-ridden due to lymphoma. In 2001, Marky urged Johnny to visit Joey saying that “the window is closing,” to which Johnny replied, “let it close. He’s not my friend.” He later showed signs of regret in the documentary End of the Century, admitting that Joey’s death had a profound impact on him emotionally and that he was depressed for “the whole week” after his death.

In 2003, he appeared on Time’s “The 10 Greatest Electric-Guitar Players”. He is also ranked number 28 on the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” list in the Rolling Stone magazine.

Douglas Glenn Colvin (September 18, 1951 – June 5, 2002), known professionally as Dee Dee Ramone, was a German-American musician, singer and songwriter best known as founding member, songwriter, bassist and occasional lead vocalist for the punk rock band the Ramones.

Though nearly all of the Ramones’ songs were credited equally to all the band members, Dee Dee was the band’s most prolific lyricist and composer, writing many of their best-known songs, such as “53rd & 3rd”, “Commando”, “Wart Hog”, “Rockaway Beach”, and “Poison Heart”. He also co-wrote “Bonzo Goes To Bitburg”, retitled “My Brain Is Hanging Upside Down,” with Ramones producer Jean Beauvoir, who was originally from The Plasmatics. The song is considered one of the band’s most important songs[citation needed] and was featured in the film School Of Rock. Dee Dee and Beauvoir also co-wrote the song “Something To Believe In”, featured on the Ramones album Animal Boy. “Bonzo Goes to Bitburg” won the New York Music Award for best independent single of the year in 1986 and Animal Boy won for best album. Beauvoir and Dee Dee later co-wrote the song “Cut Me To Pieces”, which was featured in the film Rock and Roll High School Forever.

Dee Dee was initially the band’s lead vocalist, though his (then) inability to sing and play bass at the same time resulted in original drummer Joey Ramone taking over the lead vocalist duties (however, he still sang lead vocals in the band on occasion). Dee Dee was the band’s bassist and songwriter from 1974 until 1989, when he left to pursue a short-lived career in hip hop music under the name Dee Dee King. He soon returned to his punk roots and released three solo albums featuring brand-new songs, many of which were later recorded by the Ramones. He toured the world playing his new songs, Ramones songs and some old favorites in small clubs, and continued to write songs for the Ramones until 1996, when the band officially retired.

Dee Dee struggled with drug addiction for much of his life, particularly heroin. He began using drugs as a teenager and continued to use for the majority of his adult life. He appeared clean in the early 1990s but began using heroin again sometime later. He died from a heroin overdose on June 5, 2002.

Jeffrey Ross Hyman (May 19, 1951 – April 15, 2001), known professionally as Joey Ramone, was an American musician and singer-songwriter, lead vocalist of the punk rock band the Ramones. Joey Ramone’s image, voice, and tenure as frontman of the Ramones made him a countercultural icon.

Thomas Erdelyi (born Tamás Erdélyi; January 29, 1949 – July 11, 2014), known professionally as Tommy Ramone, was a Hungarian American record producer, musician, and songwriter. He was the drummer for the influential punk rock band the Ramones for the first four years of the band’s existence and was the last surviving original member of the Ramones. – Wikipedia

Tuesday 6pm: Feature Artist – The Who, Roger Daltrey & Pete Townsend

The Who are an English rock band formed in 1964. Their classic line-up consisted of lead singer Roger Daltrey, guitarist and singer Pete Townshend, bass guitarist John Entwistle, and drummer Keith Moon. They are considered one of the most influential rock bands of the 20th century, selling over 100 million records worldwide and holding a reputation for their live shows and studio work.

The Who developed from an earlier group, the Detours, and established themselves as part of the pop art and mod movements, featuring auto-destructive art by destroying guitars and drums on stage. Their first single as the Who, “I Can’t Explain”, reached the UK top ten, followed by a string of singles including “My Generation”, “Substitute” and “Happy Jack”. In 1967, they performed at the Monterey Pop Festival and released the US top ten single “I Can See for Miles”, while touring extensively. The group’s fourth album, 1969’s rock opera Tommy, included the single “Pinball Wizard” and was a critical and commercial success. Live appearances at Woodstock and the Isle of Wight Festival, along with the live album Live at Leeds, cemented their reputation as a respected rock act. With their success came increased pressure on lead songwriter Townshend, and the follow-up to Tommy, Lifehouse, was abandoned. Songs from the project made up 1971’s Who’s Next, which included the hit “Won’t Get Fooled Again”. The group released the album Quadrophenia in 1973 as a celebration of their mod roots, and oversaw the film adaptation of Tommy in 1975. They continued to tour to large audiences before semi-retiring from live performances at the end of 1976. The release of Who Are You in 1978 was overshadowed by the death of Moon shortly after.

Kenney Jones replaced Moon and the group resumed activity, releasing a film adaptation of Quadrophenia and the retrospective documentary The Kids Are Alright. After Townshend became weary of touring, the group split in 1982. The Who occasionally re-formed for live appearances such as Live Aid in 1985, a 25th anniversary tour in 1989 and a tour of Quadrophenia in 1996–1997. They resumed regular touring in 1999, with drummer Zak Starkey. After Entwistle’s death in 2002, plans for a new album were delayed. Townshend and Daltrey continued as the Who, releasing Endless Wire in 2006, and continued to play live regularly.

The Who’s major contributions to rock music include the development of the Marshall stack, large PA systems, use of the synthesizer, Entwistle and Moon’s lead playing styles, Townshend’s feedback and power chord guitar technique, and the development of the rock opera. They are cited as an influence by hard rock, punk rock and mod bands, and their songs still receive regular exposure.

Roger Harry Daltrey CBE (born 1 March 1944) is an English singer and actor. In a career spanning more than 50 years, Daltrey came to prominence in the mid-1960s as the founder and lead singer of the rock band the Who, which released 14 singles that entered the Top 10 charts in the United Kingdom during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, including “I Can’t Explain”, “My Generation”, “Substitute”, “I’m a Boy”, “Happy Jack”, “Pictures of Lily”, “Pinball Wizard”, “Won’t Get Fooled Again”, and “You Better You Bet”. Daltrey began his solo career in 1973, while still a member of the Who. Since then, he has released eight studio albums, five compilation albums, and one live album. His solo hits include “Giving It All Away”, “Walking the Dog”, “Written on the Wind”, “Free Me”, “Without Your Love”, “Walking in My Sleep”, “After the Fire”, and “Under a Raging Moon”. In 2010, he was ranked as number 61 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 100 greatest singers of all time.

Daltrey has been known as one of the most charismatic of rock’s frontmen and famed for his powerful voice and energetic stage presence.

Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend (born 19 May 1945) is an English musician, singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist, best known as the lead guitarist, backing vocalist, and principal songwriter for the rock band the Who. His career with the Who spans over 50 years, during which time the band grew to be considered one of the most influential bands of the 20th century.

Townshend is the main songwriter for the Who, having written well over 100 songs for the band’s 11 studio albums, including concept albums and the rock operas Tommy and Quadrophenia, plus popular rock radio staples such as Who’s Next, and dozens more that appeared as non-album singles, bonus tracks on reissues, and tracks on rarities compilations such as Odds & Sods (1974). He has also written more than 100 songs that have appeared on his solo albums, as well as radio jingles and television theme songs. Although known primarily as a guitarist, he also plays keyboards, banjo, accordion, harmonica, ukulele, mandolin, violin, synthesiser, bass guitar, and drums, on his own solo albums, several Who albums and as a guest contributor to an array of other artists’ recordings. He is self-taught on all of the instruments he plays and has never had any formal training.

Townshend has also contributed to and authored many newspaper and magazine articles, book reviews, essays, books, and scripts, and he has collaborated as a lyricist and composer for many other musical acts. Due to his aggressive playing style and innovative songwriting techniques, Townshend’s works with the Who and in other projects have earned him critical acclaim. He was ranked No. 3 in Dave Marsh’s list of Best Guitarists in The New Book of Rock Lists, No. 10 in Gibson.com’s list of the top 50 guitarists, and No. 10 again in Rolling Stone magazine’s updated 2011 list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time. In 1983, Townshend received the Brit Award for Lifetime Achievement, in 1990 was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Who, in 2001 received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award as a member of the Who, and in 2008 received Kennedy Center Honors. He and Daltrey received The George and Ira Gershwin Award for Lifetime Musical Achievement at UCLA on 21 May 2016. – Wikipedia

Monday 9pm: Max 20th Century 1960

January – Stuart Sutcliffe joins the Liverpool band Johnny and the Moondogs and suggests they change their name to the Beatles; after several variations this settles on The Beatles in August.
January 14 – Elvis Presley is promoted to Sergeant in the United States Army.
January 25 – The National Association of Broadcasters in the United States reacts to the payola scandal by threatening fines for any disc jockeys accepting money for playing particular records.
February 6 – Songwriter Jesse Belvin dies in an automobile accident in Los Angeles; he is co-author of “Earth Angel”, The Penguins’ classic from 1954.
February 23 – United States Army Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps formed.
March 5 – Elvis Presley returns home from serving in the U.S. Army in Germany, having stopped off on March 2 at Glasgow Prestwick Airport, his only time in the U.K.
March 29 – The 5th Eurovision Song Contest, held at the Royal Festival Hall, London, is won by France with the song “Tom Pillibi”, sung by Jacqueline Boyer.
Spring – “Skokiaan” by Bill Haley & His Comets becomes the band’s final single to make it onto the American sales charts (with the exception of a 1974 reissue of “Rock Around the Clock”).
April 1 – Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr., Elvis Presley, Dean Martin and Mitch Miller film Sinatra’s Timex Special for ABC at Miami, Florida’s Fountainbleu Hotel.
April 2 – The National Association of Recording Merchandisers presents its first annual awards in Las Vegas, Nevada.
April 4 – RCA Victor Records announces that it will release all pop singles in mono and stereo simultaneously, the first record company to do so. Elvis Presley’s single “Stuck on You” is RCA’s first mono/stereo release.
April 17 – Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent and Cochran’s girlfriend Sharon Sheeley are injured in a car accident near Chippenham in England. Cochran dies in a hospital in Bath, Somerset, from severe brain injuries.
April 20 – Elvis Presley returns to Hollywood for the first time since coming home from Germany to film G.I. Blues.
May 2 – The Drifters’ Ben E. King leaves the group and signs a solo record contract with ATCO Records.
May 20–28 – The Beatles, as the Silver Beetles (uncredited), play their first ever tour, as a backing group for Johnny Gentle on a tour of Scotland. The lineup comprises John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Stuart Sutcliffe and Tommy Moore.
June 30 – Opening of Lionel Bart’s Oliver! in London’s West End.
July – The Shadows’ instrumental Apache is released in the U.K.
August 17 – The Beatles make their debut under this name in Hamburg, Germany, beginning a 48-night residency at the Indra club. The band at the time comprises John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Stu Sutcliffe on bass and Pete Best on drums.
August 27 – Last radio broadcast of Louisiana Hayride.
October – Dion DiMucci splits from Dion and The Belmonts.
October 16 – A single concert at the Donaueschingen Festival premieres Penderecki’s Anaklasis and Messiaen’s Chronochromie.
November 13 – Sammy Davis, Jr. marries May Britt.
December – Édith Piaf’s recording of “Non, je ne regrette rien” is released in France.

Saturday 9am: Feature Artist – Stevie Wonder

Stevland Hardaway Morris ( born May 13, 1950), known by his stage name Stevie Wonder, is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist. A child prodigy, he is considered to be one of the most critically and commercially successful musical performers of the late 20th century. Wonder signed with Motown’s Tamla label at the age of 11, and he continued performing and recording for Motown into the 2010s. He has been blind since shortly after birth.

Among Wonder’s works are singles such as “Signed, Sealed, Delivered I’m Yours”, “Superstition”, “Sir Duke”, “You Are the Sunshine of My Life” and “I Just Called to Say I Love You”; and albums such as Talking Book, Innervisions and Songs in the Key of Life. He has recorded more than 30 U.S. top ten hits and received 25 Grammy Awards, one of the most-awarded male solo artists, and has sold over 100 million records worldwide, making him one of the top 60 best-selling music artists. Wonder is also noted for his work as an activist for political causes, including his 1980 campaign to make Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday a holiday in the United States. In 2009, Wonder was named a United Nations Messenger of Peace. In 2013, Billboard magazine released a list of the Billboard Hot 100 All-Time Top Artists to celebrate the US singles chart’s 55th anniversary, with Wonder at number six. – Wikipedia

Thursday 9pm: Feature Artist – George Strait

George Harvey Strait (born May 18, 1952) is an American country music singer, songwriter, actor, and music producer. He is known as the “King of Country” and is considered one of the most influential and popular recording artists of all time. He is known for his neo-traditionalist country style, cowboy look, and being one of the first and main country artists to bring country music back to its roots and away from the pop country era in the 1980s.

Strait’s success began when his first single “Unwound” was a hit in 1981. During the 1980s, seven of his albums reached number one on the country charts. In the 2000s, Strait was named Artist of the Decade by the Academy of Country Music, was elected into the Country Music Hall of Fame, and won his first Grammy award for the album Troubadour. Strait was named CMA Entertainer of the Year in 1989, 1990 and 2013, and ACM Entertainer of the Year in 1990 and 2014. He has been nominated for more CMA and ACM awards and has more wins in both categories than any other artist.

By 2009, he broke Conway Twitty’s previous record for the most number-one hits on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart when his 44 number one singles surpassed Twitty’s 40. Counting all music charts, Strait has amassed a total of 60 number-one hits, breaking a record also previously set by Twitty, and giving him more number one songs than any other artist in any genre of music.

Strait is also known for his touring career when he designed a 360- degree configuration and introduced festival style tours. For example, the Strait Tours earned $99 million in three years. His concert at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas in June 2014 drew 104,793 people, marking a new record for largest indoor concert in North America. Strait was successful innovating country music and in numerous aspects of being a part of popular music.

Strait has sold more than 100 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling music artists of all time. His certifications from the RIAA include 13 multi-platinum, 33 platinum, and 38 gold albums. His best-selling album is Pure Country (1992), which sold 6 million (6× platinum). His highest certified album is Strait Out of the Box (1995), which sold 2 million copies (8× Platinum due to being a box set with four CDs). According to the RIAA, Strait is the 12th best-selling album recording artist in the United States overall. – Wikipedia

Thursday 8pm: Feature Artist – Lari White

Lari Michele White Cannon (May 13, 1965 – January 23, 2018) was an American country music artist and actress. She first gained national attention in 1988 as a winner on You Can Be a Star, a talent competition which aired on The Nashville Network. A recording contract with RCA Records Nashville followed a year later, producing three studio albums, a greatest hits package, and several chart singles, with three of her singles having reached Top Ten: “That’s My Baby” and “That’s How You Know (When You’re In Love)” at No. 10, and “Now I Know” at No. 5. A fourth studio album was released in 1998 on Lyric Street Records, followed by two more releases on her own label, Skinny White Girl. Overall, White charted twelve times on the Billboard country music charts. White was also married to Nashville-based songwriter Chuck Cannon.

In September 2017, White was diagnosed with cancer. Exploratory surgery in October 2017 revealed advanced peritoneal cancer. She died in Nashville, Tennessee, on January 23, 2018, at the age of 52. She was survived by her husband, songwriter Chuck Cannon, and three children. – Wikipedia

Thursday 6pm: Feature Artist – Hootie & The Blowfish & Darius Rucker

Hootie & the Blowfish is an American rock band that was formed in Columbia, South Carolina, in 1986 by Darius Rucker, Mark Bryan, Dean Felber and Jim Sonefeld. As of July 2010, the band had charted 16 singles on various Billboard singles charts and recorded five studio albums. Their debut album, Cracked Rear View (1994), is the 14th-best-selling album of all time in the United States, and was certified platinum 16 times. They have sold over 21 million copies of their albums in the United States. The group was also popular in Canada, having three number-one singles in the country.

Darius Carlos Rucker (born May 13, 1966) is an American singer and songwriter. He first gained fame as the lead vocalist and rhythm guitarist of the Grammy Award-winning American rock band Hootie & the Blowfish, which he founded in 1986 at the University of South Carolina along with Mark Bryan, Jim “Soni” Sonefeld, and Dean Felber. The band has released five studio albums with him as a member, and charted six top 40 hits on the Billboard Hot 100. Rucker co-wrote the majority of the band’s songs with the other three members.

He released a solo R&B album, Back to Then, in 2002 on Hidden Beach Recordings but did not chart any singles from it. Six years later, Rucker signed to Capitol Nashville as a country music singer, releasing the album, Learn to Live that year. Its first single, “Don’t Think I Don’t Think About It”, made him the first black artist to reach number one on the Hot Country Songs charts since Charley Pride in 1983. (Ray Charles hit number one in March 1985 in a duet with Willie Nelson with “Seven Spanish Angels”). It was followed by two more number one singles, “It Won’t Be Like This for Long” and “Alright” and the number three, “History in the Making.” In 2009, he became the first black American to win the New Artist Award from the Country Music Association, and only the second black person to win any award from the association. A second album, Charleston, SC 1966, was released on October 12, 2010. The album includes the number one singles, “Come Back Song” and “This”. – Wikipedia