Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight the LP Lounge drops a needle on the best concert recording of the 1970s. And we have two reasons, beyond the quality of the recording, that make this broadcast worth listening in on (in our own humble opinion) – First, we’ve taken the original quadraphonic vinyl, demodulated it into it’s 4 separate channels, then re-encoded it using the QS system so you can actually get a reasonable approximation of the Quad mix (either by using regular stereo headphones, or playing it through a Dolby pro-logic home theater system) – the other reason – we are bringing you the 12 minutes of Elvis that was cut from the original broadcast when RCA put it on LP. These are being played in QS surround sound as well (even though these were never on LP, we hope you won’t mind). You can hear us on RadioMaxMusic.com, or using the tuneIn app – look for RadioMaxMusic!  Encore Thursday 12am ET

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Holiday is the fourth studio album by the American folk rock band America, released on the Warner Bros. Records label in June 1974. The album was produced in London by noted record producer George Martin.

The album was a big hit in the US, reaching number 3 on the Billboard album chart and being certified gold by the RIAA. It produced two hit singles: “Tin Man” reached number 4 on the Billboard singles chart and went to number 1 on both the adult contemporary chart as well as the Radio & Records chart; and “Lonely People” which peaked at number 5 on the Billboard singles chart and also hit number 1 on the adult contemporary chart. Several other songs received radio airplay on FM stations playing album tracks, including “Baby It’s Up To You” and “Another Try”. The album was also released on Quadraphonic reel-to-reel tape for 4-channel enthusiasts.

Band Member Dewey Bunnell was thrilled at the prospect of working with Martin as producer. He was quoted as saying that it “was great working with George. It was like we knew each other. We were familiar with the Beatles, of course, and we had that British sense of humor.” In a separate interview, Dan Peek recalled to Circus magazine: “Gerry (Beckley) had been in England, and we’d talked about using George Martin as our producer. He’s such a hot arranger, thinking about all the stuff he’s done. There were several other people we wanted to use, but that idea sort of flashed and George was available.”

It was the recording debut of America’s longtime drummer Willie Leacox, who is in the car in the cover photo.

Hearts is the fifth studio album by American folk rock trio America, released by Warner Bros. Records in 1975. The album was produced by Beatles producer George Martin.

This album was a big hit in the US, reaching number 4 on the Billboard album chart and being certified GOLD by the RIAA. It produced three hit singles: “Sister Golden Hair”, which went to number 1 on the Billboard singles chart and number 5 on the adult contemporary chart; “Daisy Jane”, which peaked at 20 on the Billboard singles chart and number 4 on the Adult Contemporary chart; and the funky “Woman Tonight”, which reached 44 on the Billboard singles chart and 41 on the Adult Contemporary chart. Several other songs received radio airplay on FM stations playing album tracks including “Old Virginia”, “Bell Tree” and “Midnight”. The album was also released on Quadraphonic reel-to-reel tape for 4-channel enthusiasts.

The cover was designed by Phil Hartman, who eventually left graphic design to pursue acting, to great success.  – Wikipedia

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

This installment of the LP Lounge feature two CD4 (Quad) LP’s from the Doobie Brothers.

What Were Once Vices Are Now Habits is the fourth studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers. The album was released on February 1, 1974, by Warner Bros. Records.

Tom Johnston’s “Another Park, Another Sunday” was chosen to be the album’s first single. “It’s about losing a girl,” stated Johnston. “I wrote the chords and played it on acoustic, and then Ted Templeman had some ideas for it, like running the guitars through Leslie speakers.” The song did moderately well on the charts, peaking at #32.

The second single released was “Eyes of Silver”, another Johnston penned tune. According to him, “Wordwise, that one really isn’t that spectacular. I wrote them at the last minute.” That song didn’t have much success on the charts either. Grasping for chart action, Warner Brothers re-released the band’s first single, “Nobody”. This release was soon overshadowed when radio stations discovered “Black Water”. Other stations joined in and the song was officially released as a single that went on to sell over a million copies and became the Doobie Brothers’ first #1 hit. “Black Water” had been featured as the B-side of “Another Park, Another Sunday” eight months earlier.

Stampede is the fifth studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers. The album was released on April 25, 1975, by Warner Bros. Records. It was the final album by the band before Michael McDonald replaced Tom Johnston as lead vocalist and primary songwriter. The album has been certified gold by the RIAA.

Stampede showed the band diversifying elements of their sound more than ever before, combining elements of their old sound as well as country-rock, funk and folk music. Many guest musicians contributed on the album including Maria Muldaur, Ry Cooder and Curtis Mayfield.

The first and most successful single released from this album was “Take Me in Your Arms (Rock Me a Little While)” on April 23, 1975, a classic Motown tune written by the legendary songwriting trio of Holland-Dozier-Holland. Tom Johnston had wanted to record the song for several years. “I thought that would be a killer track to cover,” he said. “It’s probably one of my favorite songs of all time. I thought our version came out great.”

The next single, released on July 8, 1975, was “Sweet Maxine” which was more akin to the Doobie Brothers’ earlier hits style-wise. “Pat wrote the music to this and I wrote the words, ” Johnston recalled. “And Billy Payne had a lot to do with the sound of the song, because of his incredible keyboard playing.” The track stalled at #40 on the Billboard charts.

The third and final single was Patrick Simmons’ “I Cheat the Hangman”, released November 12, 1975. It is a somber outlaw ballad that was inspired by the story An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge by Ambrose Bierce. “It’s about a ghost returning to his home after the Civil War and not realizing he’s dead,” said Simmons about the song. The album version of the song is a progressive rock-style composition ending in a twisted collage of strings, horns and synthesizers made to sound like ghostly wails. “We’d cut the track, and we kicked around how to develop the ending-I thought about synthesizers and guitar solos. Ted [Templeman] got to thinking about it, and he ran it past [arranger] Nick DeCaro for some orchestration ideas. ‘Night on Bald Mountain’ by Mussorgsky really inspired the wildness of the strings, and Nick came up with the chorale thing at the end.” The ambitious “I Cheat the Hangman” only managed to reach #60 on the music charts.

“Neal’s Fandango” was inspired by the Santa Cruz mountains and was an homage to Neal Cassady, Merry Prankster bus driver and former Jack Kerouac sidekick in On The Road. It was occasionally played on San Francisco Bay Area classic rock station KFOX “K-FOX” (that means KUFX) because of the Doobie Brothers’ South Bay roots. – Wikipedia

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Today on the LP Lounge join Willie B for two Doobie Brothers releases in QUAD.

Toulouse Street is the second studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers. The album was released on July 1, 1972, by Warner Bros. Records. It was their first album with new bassist Tiran Porter and second drummer Michael Hossack to augment existing drummer John Hartman, so it meant that they now had their trademark twin-drummer sound. Toulouse Street is the name of a street in the French Quarter of New Orleans. The cover and inside centerfold photos were taken at a former brothel on Toulouse Street.

The Captain and Me is the third studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers. The album was released on March 2, 1973, by Warner Bros. Records. It features some of their most popular hits including “Long Train Runnin'”, “China Grove” and “Without You”. The album is certified 2x Platinum by the RIAA. The album was originally released in Quadraphonic sound on the CD-4 Quadradisc system and also on Quadraphonic 8-track tape. The album was also released in 2002 remixed into 5.1 multichannel DVD-Audio, and on 14 September 2011, on hybrid stereo-multichannel Super Audio CD by Warner Japan in their Warner Premium Sound series.

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Today on the LP Lounge we feature two Quad LP’s from the 70’s. Join Willie B, 10pm ET on RadioMaxMusic.

Rocks is the fourth studio album by American rock band Aerosmith, released May 3, 1976. AllMusic described Rocks as having “captured Aerosmith at their most raw and rocking.” Rocks was ranked No. 176 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. It has greatly influenced many hard rock and heavy metal artists, including Guns N’ Roses, Metallica, and Nirvana. The album was a commercial success, charting three singles on the Billboard Hot 100, two of which reached the Top 40 (“Back in the Saddle” and “Last Child”). The album was one of the first to ship platinum when it was released, and has since gone quadruple platinum.

Why Dontcha is the first studio album by power trio West, Bruce and Laing. The album features “The Doctor”, which received heavy FM radio airplay upon the album’s release and became a signature song in live performance for the band. Other noteworthy tracks include “Out into the Fields”, which Jack Bruce continued to perform in concert following West, Bruce and Laing’s breakup (and which he re-recorded for his 2001 album Shadows in the Air), and “Love is Worth the Blues”, a song loosely based on the chords and structure of The Rolling Stones’ “Play with Fire”. Why Dontcha was West, Bruce and Laing’s most successful album, reaching No. 26 on the Billboard U.S. album chart. – Wikipedia

Monday 10pm – LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight at 10pm (US East Coast time) its the LP Lounge featuring 2 SQ Classics – and 2 bonus tracks. you know the LPs, so I’ll promote the bonus tracks. As a companion to Machine Head I’m offering up a QS encoded version of Smoke on the Water, as performed live in concert, and to go with the Raiders – in glorious monophonic sound is the original 1959 recording that started it all. Before Don Fardon, before John D Loudermilk – it was Marvin Rainwater and Pale Faced Indian. Check us out!!

RAIDERS – INDIAN RESERVATION
As a promotional gambit, Paul Revere took the unusual step of riding cross-country four times, plugging the song at every market available. His efforts paid off: “Indian Reservation” peaked at No. 1 for one week in July. Paul Revere: “I called the head of Columbia’s promotion and told him I was going on a record promotion trip, which was something artists didn’t do anymore.” “Indian Reservation” became Columbia’s biggest-selling single for almost a decade, clearing over six million units. The success of the single was followed by a Top 20 album (Indian Reservation) and the No. 23 hit “Birds of a Feather”. The Raiders also expanded to include drummer Omar Martinez and keyboardist Bob Wooley.

DEEP PURPLE – MACHINE HEAD
Machine Head is the sixth studio album released by the English rock band Deep Purple. It was recorded through December 1971 in Montreux, Switzerland, and released in March 1972.

Machine Head is often cited as a major influence in the early development of the heavy metal music genre. Commercially, it is Deep Purple’s most successful album, topping the charts in several countries following its release. The album reached number 1 in the United Kingdom and stayed in the top 40 for 20 weeks. It reached number 7 in the United States, remaining on the Billboard 200 for 118 weeks. – Wikipedia

 

 

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight at 10pm (US East Coast Time) we drop the needle on 2 classics at the LP Lounge.

Ten Years After (A Space in Time), and the Supreme’s Greatest Hits.

The first LP will be a direct from the vinyl LP SQ presentation. The Supremes Greatest was only released in quad, in Japan, and only on CD-4. Since I don’t have the where-with-all to play discrete quad – I’ve taken that LP, demodulated it, then encoded it for QS, so you can get some idea what the surround effect was. Still in all, a true vinyl LP, and a mix only possible from that original platter – so I think I’m still keeping it real. You be the judge, check us out at RadioMaxMusic.com

A Space in Time is the sixth studio album by the British blues rock band Ten Years After. It was released in August 1971 by Chrysalis Records in the United Kingdom and Columbia Records in America. A departure in style from their previous albums, A Space in Time is less ‘heavy’ than previous albums and includes more acoustic guitar, perhaps influenced by the success of Led Zeppelin who were mixing acoustic songs with heavier numbers. It reached number 17 in the Billboard 200.

The third track on the album, “I’d Love to Change the World”, is also their biggest hit. By combining a melodic acoustic chorus with challenging electric guitar riffs, they managed to produce a sound that hit number 10 in the charts in Canada and number 40 in the USA. Although this was their biggest hit, they rarely played it live. “Baby Won’t You Let Me Rock ‘n’ Roll You” also charted in the USA, peaking at number 61. – Wikipedia