Tag: Ten Years After

Friday 11am ET: Feature Artist – Ten Years After

Ten Years After are a British blues rock band, most popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Between 1968 and 1973, Ten Years After scored eight Top 40 albums on the UK Albums Chart. In addition they had twelve albums enter the US Billboard 200, and are best known for tracks such as “I’m Going Home”, “Hear Me Calling”, “I’d Love to Change the World” and “Love Like a Man”. Their musical style consisted of blues rock and hard rock.

In January 2014, it was announced that both Gooch and Lyons had left Ten Years After. Two months later, veteran bass player Colin Hodgkinson and singer/guitarist Marcus Bonfanti were announced as their replacements.

In October 2017, the band released its most recent studio album, A Sting in the Tale.

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight at 10pm (US East Coast Time) we drop the needle on 2 classics at the LP Lounge.

Ten Years After (A Space in Time), and the Supreme’s Greatest Hits.

The first LP will be a direct from the vinyl LP SQ presentation. The Supremes Greatest was only released in quad, in Japan, and only on CD-4. Since I don’t have the where-with-all to play discrete quad – I’ve taken that LP, demodulated it, then encoded it for QS, so you can get some idea what the surround effect was. Still in all, a true vinyl LP, and a mix only possible from that original platter – so I think I’m still keeping it real. You be the judge, check us out at RadioMaxMusic.com

A Space in Time is the sixth studio album by the British blues rock band Ten Years After. It was released in August 1971 by Chrysalis Records in the United Kingdom and Columbia Records in America. A departure in style from their previous albums, A Space in Time is less ‘heavy’ than previous albums and includes more acoustic guitar, perhaps influenced by the success of Led Zeppelin who were mixing acoustic songs with heavier numbers. It reached number 17 in the Billboard 200.

The third track on the album, “I’d Love to Change the World”, is also their biggest hit. By combining a melodic acoustic chorus with challenging electric guitar riffs, they managed to produce a sound that hit number 10 in the charts in Canada and number 40 in the USA. Although this was their biggest hit, they rarely played it live. “Baby Won’t You Let Me Rock ‘n’ Roll You” also charted in the USA, peaking at number 61. – Wikipedia