Artist Countdown: Pam Tillis Top 35 Hits 6pm ET @PamTillis

July 23, 2013
Editor In Chief

PamTillisPamela Yvonne “Pam” Tillis (born July 24, 1957 in Plant City, Florida) is an America country music singer-songwriter and actress. She is the daughter of country music singer Mel Tillis and one of five children.

Originally a demo singer in Nashville, Tennessee, Tillis was signed to Warner Bros. Records in 1981, for which she released nine singles and one album, Above and Beyond the Doll of Cutey. By 1991, she had signed to Arista Nashville, entering Top 40 on Hot Country Songs for the first time with “Don’t Tell Me What to Do”, the first of five singles from her album Put Yourself in My Place. Tillis recorded five more albums for Arista Nashville between then and 2001, plus a greatest hits album and 22 more singles. Her only number 1 hit on the country charts was 1995’s “Mi Vida Loca (My Crazy Life)“, although 12 other singles made Top 10 on that chart. After exiting Arista, Tillis released It’s All Relative: Tillis Sings Tillis for Lucky Dog Records in 2002, plus RhineStoned and the Christmas album Just in Time for Christmas on her own Stellar Cat label in 2007. Her albums Homeward Looking Angel (1992), Sweetheart’s Dance (1994) and Greatest Hits (1997) are all certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), while Put Yourself in My Place and 1995’s All of This Love are certified gold.

Besides her own work, Tillis co-wrote and sang on the 1990 Warner Bros. single “Tomorrow’s World”, written in honor of Earth Day, and Dolly Parton’s 1992 single “Romeo”. She has won two major awards: a Grammy Award for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals in 1999 for the multi-artist collaboration “Same Old Train”, and the 1994 Country Music Association award for Best Female Vocalist. (Source: Wikipedia)

1 Mi Vida Loca (My Crazy Life)
2 Shake the Sugar Tree
3 Maybe It Was Memphis
4 Deep Down
5 All the Good Ones Are Gone
6 In Between Dances
7 One of Those Things
8 Let That Pony Run
9 Spilled Perfume
10 When You Walk in the Room
11 Put Yourself in My Place
12 I Said a Prayer
13 Land of the Living
14 The River and the Highway
15 Don’t Tell Me What to Do
16 Cleopatra, Queen of Denial
17 Do You Know Where Your Man Is
18 It’s Lonely Out There
19 I Was Blown Away
20 Please
21 Blue Rose Is
22 Romeo (with Parton, Cyrus, Mattea, Carpenter, Tucker)
23 Every Time
24 After a Kiss
25 Betty’s Got a Bass Boat
26 Those Memories of You
27 I Wish She Wouldn’t Treat You That Way
28 Goodbye Highway
29 There Goes My Love
30 Killer Comfort
31 Love Sneakin’ Up on You
32 Thunder & Roses
33 Unmitigated Gall
34 So Wrong
35 Band in the Window

Artist Countdown: Radney Foster Top 30 Hits 4pm ET @RadneyFoster

July 20, 2013
Editor In Chief

Radney-FosterRadney Foster (born July 20, 1959, Del Rio, Texas, United States) is an American singer-songwriter and music producer. Initially a songwriter in Nashville, Tennessee, Foster made his recording debut as part of the Foster & Lloyd duo, recording three studio albums and with nine singles on the country charts.

Foster began his solo career in 1992 and his album Del Rio, TX 1959 produced four consecutive Top 40 hits. However, his commercial success waned with the release subsequent albums such as Labor of Love (1995), See What You Want to See (1999), Are You Ready for the Big Show?, Another Way to Go (2002) and This World We Live In (2006). Overall, Foster has had thirteen songs on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, including the Top Ten hits “Just Call Me Lonesome” (#10, 1992) and “Nobody Wins” (#2, 1993). His songs have been recorded by Gary Allan, Sara Evans, Keith Urban and Jack Ingram.

Foster & Lloyd is an American country music duo consisting of singer-songwriters Radney Foster and Bill Lloyd. Founded in 1986, the duo recorded three albums for RCA Records, in addition to charting nine singles on the Billboard country charts. The highest-peaking of these was their debut single “Crazy Over You”, a No. 4 hit in 1987. After disbanding in 1990, Foster and Lloyd both began solo careers and reunited in 2010 to release their fourth studio album. (Source: Wikipedia)

1 Nobody Wins
2 Fair Shake  (Foster & Lloyd)
3 Sure Thing  (Foster & Lloyd)
4 Easier Said Than Done
5 Just Call Me Lonesome
6 Is It Love  (Foster & Lloyd)
7 Hammer and Nails
8 Before the Heartache Rolls In  (Foster & Lloyd)
9 Can’t Have Nothin’  (Foster & Lloyd)
10 Crazy Over You  (Foster & Lloyd)
11 What Do You Want from Me This Time
12 Texas in 1880  (Foster & Lloyd)
13 Closing Time
14 Everyday Angel
15 Willin’ to Walk
16 If It Were Me
17 Scary Old World (with Chely Wright)
18 Suzette  (Foster & Lloyd)
19 Texas in 1880 (with Pat Green)
20 Labor of Love
21 The Running Kind
22 Godspeed (Sweet Dreams)
23 I’m In (with Abra Moore)
24 Half of My Mistakes
25 Prove Me Right
26 A Little Revival
27 Angel Flight
28 Jesse’s Soul
29 Make It Up As I Go Along
30 Real Fine Place To Start

 

In Memoriam: George Jones (1931 – 2013)

April 26, 2013
Editor In Chief

George JonesNASHVILLE – Country Music Hall of Famer, Grand Ole Opry member, and Kennedy Center Honoree George Glenn Jones died early Friday at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., the singer’s PR company said in a statement. He was hospitalized April 18 with fever and irregular blood pressure.

Born Sept. 12, 1931, Jones is regarded among the most important and influential singers in American popular music history. He was the singer of enduring country music hits including She Thinks I Still Care, The Grand Tour, Walk Through This World With Me, Tender Years and He Stopped Loving Her Today.

“A singer who can soar from a deep growl to dizzying heights, he is the undisputed successor of earlier natural geniuses such as Hank Williams and Lefty Frizzell,” wrote Bob Allen in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum‘s “Encyclopedia of Country Music.”

Jones was born in Saratoga, Texas, and he played on the streets of Beaumont for tips as a teenager. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps before returning to Texas and recording for the Starday label in Houston, Texas. In 1955, his “Why Baby Why” became his first Top 10 country single, peaking at number four and beginning a remarkable commercial string: Jones would ultimately record more than 160 charting singles, more than any other artist in any format in the history of popular music.

Jones’ first number one hit came in 1959 with “White Lightning,” a Mercury Records single that topped Billboard country charts for five weeks. He moved on to United Artists and then to Musicor, notching hits including “She Thinks I Still Care,” “The Race Is On,” “A Good Year for the Roses” and “Walk Through This World With Me.”

Jones signed with Epic Records in 1971 and worked with producer Billy Sherrill to craft a sound at once elegant and rooted, scoring with “The Grand Tour,” “Bartenders Blues” and many more. Sherrill also produced duets between Jones and his then-wife Tammy Wynette, and in the 1970s they scored top-charting hits including “We’re Gonna Hold On,” “Golden Ring” and “Near You.”

By the time “Golden Ring” and “Near You” hit in 1976, Jones and Wynette were divorced, and Jones was battling personal demons. His solo career cooled until 1980, when he recorded “He Stopped Loving Her Today,” a ballad penned by Curly Putman and Bobby Braddock that helped Jones win Country Music Association prizes for best male vocal and top single. “He Stopped Loving Her Today” revived a flagging career, and Jones won the CMA’s top male vocalist award in 1980 and 1981. He also earned a Grammy for best male country vocal performance.

In 1983, Jones married the former Nancy Ford Sepulvado. The union, he repeatedly said, began his rehabilitation from drugs and alcohol and prolonged his life. He signed with MCA Records in 1990 and began a successful run, and he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1992. His guest vocal on Patty Loveless’ “You Don’t Seem To Miss Me” won a CMA award for top vocal event in 1998, and it became his final Top 20 country hit.

In 1999, Jones nearly died in a car wreck, but he recovered and resumed touring and recording. He remained a force in music until his death, playing hundreds of shows in the new century and collecting the nation’s highest arts award, the Kennedy Center Honor for lifetime achievement, in 2008. In late 2012, Jones announced his farewell tour, which was to conclude with a sold-out, star-packed show at Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena on November 22, 2013. Alan Jackson, Garth Brooks, Randy Travis, Charlie Daniels, Kenny Rogers, Sam Moore, The Oak Ridge Boys and many others were set to perform at Jones’ Bridgestone show.

Jones is survived by his wife of 30 years Nancy Jones, his sister Helen Scroggins, and by his children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews.

© Copyright (c) The Calgary Herald   

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/Country+music+legend+George+Jones+dead/8299898/story.html#ixzz2RZzfbF1V

George Glenn Jones (September 12, 1931-April 26, 2013) is an American country music singer known for his long list of hit records, his distinctive voice and phrasing, and his marriage to Tammy Wynette.

Over the past 20 years, Jones has frequently been referred to as the greatest living country singer.[2][3] Country music scholar Bill C. Malone writes, “For the two or three minutes consumed by a song, Jones immerses himself so completely in its lyrics, and in the mood it conveys, that the listener can scarcely avoid becoming similarly involved.” Waylon Jennings, in his song “It’s Alright” expressed a common jealousy when he said, “If we all could sound like we wanted to, we’d all sound like George Jones.”

Throughout his long career, Jones made headlines often as much for tales of his drinking, stormy relationships with women, and violent rages as for his prolific career of making records and touring. His wild lifestyle led to Jones missing many performances, earning him the nickname “No Show Jones.”[1] With the help of his fourth wife, Nancy, he has been sober for more than 10 years. Jones has had more than 150 hits during his career, both as a solo artist and in duets with other artists. The shape of his nose and facial features have given Jones the nickname “The Possum.” Jones said in an interview that he has chosen to tour only about 60 dates a year.

In August 2012, it was announced that at the conclusion of his 2013 tour, Jones’ would retire to spend more time with his family. Titled “The Grand Tour”, Jones’ final tour takes place across 60 dates [4]

George Glenn Jones died Friday, April 26, 2013 at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee. He was hospitalized April 18 with fever and irregular blood pressure. – Wikipedia

 

 

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