Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

The Best of Aretha Franklin is a 1973 compilation by Aretha Franklin. It contains alternate takes and is one of only a few quadraphonic releases. It was reissued on DVD-Audio by Rhino Handmade in August 2010. It is not to be confused with a 1984 compilation of the same name.

  1. “Respect” – 2:24
  2. “Baby, I Love You” – 2:46
  3. “Chain of Fools” – 4:22 an alternate version exclusive to this compilation
  4. “Rock Steady” – 4:19 contains an alternate introduction exclusive to this compilation
  5. “Spanish Harlem” – 3:40
  6. “Don’t Play That Song” – 2:48
  7. “Dr. Feelgood” – 3:18
  8. “Day Dreaming” – 3:49
  9. “I Say A Little Prayer” – 3:22
  10. “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” – 2:43
  11. “Call Me” – 3:24
  12. “Bridge over Troubled Water” – 5:30

Aretha Live at Fillmore West is the third live album by American singer Aretha Franklin. Released on May 19, 1971 by Atlantic Records. It was reissued on compact disc in 1993 through Rhino Records. An expanded, limited edition 4-CD box set entitled, Don’t Fight the Feeling: The Complete Aretha Franklin & King Curtis Live at Fillmore West was released by Rhino in 2005. This was limited to 5000 numbered copies. In addition, there is a guest duet vocal by Ray Charles on “Spirit in the Dark”.

Franklin played a Fender Rhodes piano on four cuts, including “Eleanor Rigby”, “Spirit in the Dark”, “Don’t Play That Song” and “Dr. Feelgood”. Backing Franklin was King Curtis’ band, the Kingpins, featuring Cornell Dupree on guitar, Bernard Purdie on drums, and Jerry Jemmott on bass, Billy Preston on organ, Curtis on saxophone, together with the Memphis Horns.

   1. “Respect” Otis Redding 3:53
   2. “Love the One You’re With” 4:15
   3. “Bridge Over Troubled Water” 5:55
   4. “Eleanor Rigby” 2:33
   5. “Make It with You” 4:33
   6. “Don’t Play That Song 3:16
   7. “Dr. Feelgood” 7:06
   8. “Spirit in the Dark” 5:33
   9. “Spirit in the Dark” (Reprise with Ray Charles) 8:53
 10. “Reach Out and Touch” 2:35

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Two LP’s from the Vinyl Resting Place Vault – Join Willie B with

Both Sides Now is a concept album by Canadian singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell that was released in 2000. It is her 17th studio album. The album won two Grammy Awards in 2001 for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album and Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s) for the song “Both Sides, Now”.

The album traces the progress of the modern relationship through Mitchell’s orchestral renditions of classic jazz songs. Two of her songs are included: “A Case of You” (1971) and “Both Sides, Now” (1969). The orchestra was arranged and conducted by Vince Mendoza.

In the liner notes, co-producer Larry Klein describes the album as “a programmatic suite documenting a relationship from initial flirtation through optimistic consummation, metamorphosing into disillusionment, ironic despair, and finally resolving in the philosophical overview of acceptance and the probability of the cycle repeating itself”.

A limited run of copies was released on February 8, 2000, in chocolate box packaging for Valentine’s Day with several lithographs of Mitchell paintings. A jewel-case edition was released on March 20, 2000.

On tour, Mitchell performed the songs in the same sequence as the album, but she opened with the overture “Nuages”, the first movement from Nocturnes, an orchestral suite composed by Claude Debussy. “Nuages” is the French word for “clouds”. Although the music sets a romantic mood, the use of this piece can be seen as a pun since Clouds is the name of the album on which the song “Both Sides, Now” made its appearance.

1. “You’re My Thrill” 3:52
2. “At Last” 4:28
3. “Comes Love” 4:29
4. “You’ve Changed” 5:00
5. “Answer Me, My Love”3:23
6. “A Case of You” 5:52
7. “Don’t Go to Strangers” 4:10
8. “Sometimes I’m Happy” 3:58
9. “Don’t Worry ’bout Me” 3:49
10. “Stormy Weather” 3:07
11. “I Wish I Were in Love Again” 3:36
12. “Both Sides, Now” 5:40

Carl Hilding “Doc” Severinsen (born July 7, 1927) is an American jazz trumpeter who led the band for The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.

Severinsen was born in Arlington, Oregon, to Minnie Mae (1897–1998) and Carl Severinsen (1898–1972).[He was nicknamed Doc after his father, the only dentist in Arlington. His father played violin and wanted him to play, too, but Severinsen wanted to play trombone. Because his arms weren’t long enough for trombone and the small Arlington music store had none available, he settled for cornet. A neighbor gave him some help on how to play, while his father, tobacco in mouth, instructed him to spit out the notes like spitting tobacco. His mother threatened to spank him if he didn’t practice.

Severinsen proved to have a knack for the instrument. He was in a high school band when he was seven, and two years later he won a state trumpet contest. At thirteen, he joined a multi-state all-star band, and at fourteen he auditioned for Tommy Dorsey but wasn’t hired. He started a quartet called the Blue Notes that performed at local dances.

Before graduating from high school, he was hired to go on the road with the Ted Fio Rito Orchestra. After he graduated, he went on tour with Charlie Barnet, Tommy Dorsey, and Benny Goodman. He was drafted by the Army during World War II. In 1946, he played trumpet on radio station KODL.

Doc Severinsen His Trumpet And Orchestra* ‎– Fever
Label: Command ‎– RS 893-S.D., Command ‎– RS 893SD
Format: Vinyl, LP, Album, Stereo
Country: US
Released 1966
Genre: Jazz
Style: Easy Listening

Fever ‎(LP, Album, Quad) Command RS 893-S.D. Colombia 1971

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight the LP Lounge drops a needle on the best concert recording of the 1970s. And we have two reasons, beyond the quality of the recording, that make this broadcast worth listening in on (in our own humble opinion) – First, we’ve taken the original quadraphonic vinyl, demodulated it into it’s 4 separate channels, then re-encoded it using the QS system so you can actually get a reasonable approximation of the Quad mix (either by using regular stereo headphones, or playing it through a Dolby pro-logic home theater system) – the other reason – we are bringing you the 12 minutes of Elvis that was cut from the original broadcast when RCA put it on LP. These are being played in QS surround sound as well (even though these were never on LP, we hope you won’t mind). You can hear us on RadioMaxMusic.com, or using the tuneIn app – look for RadioMaxMusic!  Encore Thursday 12am ET

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Holiday is the fourth studio album by the American folk rock band America, released on the Warner Bros. Records label in June 1974. The album was produced in London by noted record producer George Martin.

The album was a big hit in the US, reaching number 3 on the Billboard album chart and being certified gold by the RIAA. It produced two hit singles: “Tin Man” reached number 4 on the Billboard singles chart and went to number 1 on both the adult contemporary chart as well as the Radio & Records chart; and “Lonely People” which peaked at number 5 on the Billboard singles chart and also hit number 1 on the adult contemporary chart. Several other songs received radio airplay on FM stations playing album tracks, including “Baby It’s Up To You” and “Another Try”. The album was also released on Quadraphonic reel-to-reel tape for 4-channel enthusiasts.

Band Member Dewey Bunnell was thrilled at the prospect of working with Martin as producer. He was quoted as saying that it “was great working with George. It was like we knew each other. We were familiar with the Beatles, of course, and we had that British sense of humor.” In a separate interview, Dan Peek recalled to Circus magazine: “Gerry (Beckley) had been in England, and we’d talked about using George Martin as our producer. He’s such a hot arranger, thinking about all the stuff he’s done. There were several other people we wanted to use, but that idea sort of flashed and George was available.”

It was the recording debut of America’s longtime drummer Willie Leacox, who is in the car in the cover photo.

Hearts is the fifth studio album by American folk rock trio America, released by Warner Bros. Records in 1975. The album was produced by Beatles producer George Martin.

This album was a big hit in the US, reaching number 4 on the Billboard album chart and being certified GOLD by the RIAA. It produced three hit singles: “Sister Golden Hair”, which went to number 1 on the Billboard singles chart and number 5 on the adult contemporary chart; “Daisy Jane”, which peaked at 20 on the Billboard singles chart and number 4 on the Adult Contemporary chart; and the funky “Woman Tonight”, which reached 44 on the Billboard singles chart and 41 on the Adult Contemporary chart. Several other songs received radio airplay on FM stations playing album tracks including “Old Virginia”, “Bell Tree” and “Midnight”. The album was also released on Quadraphonic reel-to-reel tape for 4-channel enthusiasts.

The cover was designed by Phil Hartman, who eventually left graphic design to pursue acting, to great success.  – Wikipedia

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Today on the LP Lounge join Willie B for two Doobie Brothers releases in QUAD.

Toulouse Street is the second studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers. The album was released on July 1, 1972, by Warner Bros. Records. It was their first album with new bassist Tiran Porter and second drummer Michael Hossack to augment existing drummer John Hartman, so it meant that they now had their trademark twin-drummer sound. Toulouse Street is the name of a street in the French Quarter of New Orleans. The cover and inside centerfold photos were taken at a former brothel on Toulouse Street.

The Captain and Me is the third studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers. The album was released on March 2, 1973, by Warner Bros. Records. It features some of their most popular hits including “Long Train Runnin'”, “China Grove” and “Without You”. The album is certified 2x Platinum by the RIAA. The album was originally released in Quadraphonic sound on the CD-4 Quadradisc system and also on Quadraphonic 8-track tape. The album was also released in 2002 remixed into 5.1 multichannel DVD-Audio, and on 14 September 2011, on hybrid stereo-multichannel Super Audio CD by Warner Japan in their Warner Premium Sound series.

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Today on the LP Lounge we feature two Quad LP’s from the 70’s. Join Willie B, 10pm ET on RadioMaxMusic.

Rocks is the fourth studio album by American rock band Aerosmith, released May 3, 1976. AllMusic described Rocks as having “captured Aerosmith at their most raw and rocking.” Rocks was ranked No. 176 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. It has greatly influenced many hard rock and heavy metal artists, including Guns N’ Roses, Metallica, and Nirvana. The album was a commercial success, charting three singles on the Billboard Hot 100, two of which reached the Top 40 (“Back in the Saddle” and “Last Child”). The album was one of the first to ship platinum when it was released, and has since gone quadruple platinum.

Why Dontcha is the first studio album by power trio West, Bruce and Laing. The album features “The Doctor”, which received heavy FM radio airplay upon the album’s release and became a signature song in live performance for the band. Other noteworthy tracks include “Out into the Fields”, which Jack Bruce continued to perform in concert following West, Bruce and Laing’s breakup (and which he re-recorded for his 2001 album Shadows in the Air), and “Love is Worth the Blues”, a song loosely based on the chords and structure of The Rolling Stones’ “Play with Fire”. Why Dontcha was West, Bruce and Laing’s most successful album, reaching No. 26 on the Billboard U.S. album chart. – Wikipedia

Monday 10pm – LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight at 10pm (US East Coast time) its the LP Lounge featuring 2 SQ Classics – and 2 bonus tracks. you know the LPs, so I’ll promote the bonus tracks. As a companion to Machine Head I’m offering up a QS encoded version of Smoke on the Water, as performed live in concert, and to go with the Raiders – in glorious monophonic sound is the original 1959 recording that started it all. Before Don Fardon, before John D Loudermilk – it was Marvin Rainwater and Pale Faced Indian. Check us out!!

RAIDERS – INDIAN RESERVATION
As a promotional gambit, Paul Revere took the unusual step of riding cross-country four times, plugging the song at every market available. His efforts paid off: “Indian Reservation” peaked at No. 1 for one week in July. Paul Revere: “I called the head of Columbia’s promotion and told him I was going on a record promotion trip, which was something artists didn’t do anymore.” “Indian Reservation” became Columbia’s biggest-selling single for almost a decade, clearing over six million units. The success of the single was followed by a Top 20 album (Indian Reservation) and the No. 23 hit “Birds of a Feather”. The Raiders also expanded to include drummer Omar Martinez and keyboardist Bob Wooley.

DEEP PURPLE – MACHINE HEAD
Machine Head is the sixth studio album released by the English rock band Deep Purple. It was recorded through December 1971 in Montreux, Switzerland, and released in March 1972.

Machine Head is often cited as a major influence in the early development of the heavy metal music genre. Commercially, it is Deep Purple’s most successful album, topping the charts in several countries following its release. The album reached number 1 in the United Kingdom and stayed in the top 40 for 20 weeks. It reached number 7 in the United States, remaining on the Billboard 200 for 118 weeks. – Wikipedia