Tag: John Lennon

Friday 10/8/21 1pm ET: Feature Artist: John Lennon

John Lennon was an English singer-songwriter and one of the four principal members of the Beatles. His first three studio albums are experiments with Yoko Ono using tape loops, interviews, musique concrète, and other avant-garde performance techniques. Lennon also released one live album and three singles under his own name before the break-up of the Beatles. Studio album discography in Lennon’s home idiom of rock and roll begins with Plastic Ono Band from 1970.

By 2012, Lennon’s solo album sales in the US had exceeded 14 million units. He had 25 number-one singles on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart as a writer, co-writer or performer.

Monday 1/4/2021 12am ET: Feature LP: John Lennon & Yoko Ono – Double Fantasy (1980)

Double Fantasy is the fifth album by John Lennon and Yoko Ono, released in November 1980 on Geffen Records. Produced by Lennon, Ono and Jack Douglas, it was the seventh and final studio album released by Lennon during his lifetime. The album marked Lennon’s return to recording music full-time, following his five-year hiatus to raise his son Sean. Recording sessions took place at The Hit Factory in New York City between August and October 1980. The final album features songs from both Lennon and Ono, largely alternating between the two in its track listing. Other tracks recorded by Lennon from the sessions were compiled by Ono for release on Milk and Honey in 1984.

Upon its release, the album stalled on music charts and received largely negative reviews from music critics, with many focusing on the album’s idealisation of Lennon and Ono’s marriage. However, following Lennon’s murder three weeks after its release, it became a worldwide commercial success and went on to win the 1981 Grammy Award for Album of the Year at the 24th Annual Grammy Awards in 1982. In subsequent decades, the album has been viewed favourably, with Lennon’s songs in particular garnering praise as some of his finest.

In 2010, Ono and Douglas released a remix of the album, titled Double Fantasy Stripped Down, which featured less lavish production than the original.

1. “(Just Like) Starting Over” 3:56
2. “Kiss Kiss Kiss” 2:42
3. “Cleanup Time” 2:58
4. “Give Me Something” 1:35
5. “I’m Losing You” 3:57
6. “I’m Moving On” 2:20
7. “Beautiful Boy (Darling Boy)” 4:02

1. “Watching the Wheels” 4:00
2. “Yes, I’m Your Angel” 3:08
3. “Woman” 3:32
4. “Beautiful Boys” 2:55
5. “Dear Yoko” 2:34
6. “Every Man Has a Woman Who Loves Him” 4:02
7. “Hard Times Are Over” 3:20

15. “Help Me to Help Myself” 2:37
16. “Walking on Thin Ice” 6:00
17. “Central Park Stroll” (dialogue) 0:17

John Lennon – lead, harmony and background vocals, rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar, piano, keyboards, synthesiser, arranger and producer
Yoko Ono – lead and background vocals, arranger and producer
Randal S Turner – background vocals
Jack Douglas – arranger and producer
Earl Slick – lead guitar
Hugh McCracken – lead guitar
Tony Levin – bass guitar
George Small – keyboards, piano, synthesizer
Andy Newmark – drums
Arthur Jenkins – percussion
Ed Walsh – keyboards, synthesiser
Randy Stein – English concertina
Robert Greenidge – steel drum on “Beautiful Boy”
Matthew Cunningham – hammer dulcimer on “Watching the Wheels”
Howard Johnson – horns
Grant Hungerford – horns
John Parran – horns
Seldon Powell – horns
George “Young” Opalisky – horns
Roger Rosenberg – horns
David Tofani – horns
Ronald Tooley – horns
Tony Davillo – horn arrangements and musical associate
Cas Mijac (Michelle Simpson, Cassandra Wooten, Cheryl Mason Jacks), Eric Troyer, Benny Cummings Singers, The Kings Temple Choir – background vocals

Tuesday 12/8/2020 4pm ET: John Lennon Final Interview (December 8, 1980)

John Lennon’s last days were filled with professional and domestic routines characteristic of both a typical wealthy New Yorker and a legendary rock star and activist: making breakfast and watching Sesame Street with his son Sean, going on epic shopping sprees, spending late nights in the studio, staging demonstrations, arguing with his retinue of servants and hangers-on. After five years in semi-retirement, or “siege like retreat,” spent raising Sean, John Lennon seemed ready to emerge from seclusion and renew his career. On his final day, December 8, 1980, he was feeling hopeful about his creative future. He had just learned that his album with Yoko, Double Fantasy, had gone gold, and he and Yoko were engaged in promotion, and were looking forward to their next musical endeavor.

That morning, Annie Leibovitz and her assistant came to the Lennon’s apartment building, The Dakota, to shoot those now iconic photographs for Rolling Stone of the Lennon’s in bed. Meanwhile, a devoted fan named Paul Goresh, and Lennon’s murderer Mark David Chapman, started to hang around outside the building. Less than two hours later, a crew from San Francisco’s RKO radio arrived at The Dakota to interview John and Yoko. Interviewer Dave Sholin remembers meeting Lennon, who was getting dressed after the nude photo shoot: “the door opens and John jumps in with his arms extended, like ‘here I am folks!’ We were meeting John Lennon and we were all maybe a little nervous but that just put us right at ease in probably less than a minute.” “He was a regular guy, very, very sharp and extremely quick witted,” Sholin continued. “And he connected with all of us. He had been out of the public eye for five years and he was open to speaking about anything. He did not hold back.”

You can hear that interview as John and Yoko talk in great detail about Double Fantasy, about parenting, about meeting, falling in love, and working together. Lennon also talks about his social vision and the need for “holistic” solutions to “stop this paranoia of 90-year old men playing macho games with the world and possibly the galaxy.” Notably, he offers his assessment of the cultural shifts from the sixties through the seventies.

The bit about the sixties we were all full of hope and then everybody got depressed and the seventies were terrible – that attitude that everybody has; that the sixties was therefore negated for being naïve and dumb. And the seventies is really where it’s at, which means, you know, putting makeup on and dancing in the disco – which was fine for the seventies – but I don’t negate the sixties. I don’t negate the seventies. The … the seeds that were planted in the sixties – and possibly they were planted generations before – but the seed… whatever happened in the sixties the… the flowering of that is in the feminist, feminization of society. The meditation, the positive learning that people are doing in all walks of life. That is a direct result of the opening up of the sixties. Now, maybe in the sixties we were naïve and like children everybody went back to their room and said, ‘Well, we didn’t get a wonderful world of just flowers and peace and happy chocolate and, and, and it wasn’t just pretty and beautiful all the time’ and that’s what everybody did, ‘we didn’t get everything we wanted’ just like babies and everybody went back to their rooms and sulked. And we’re just gonna play rock and roll and not do anything else . We’re gonna stay in our rooms and the world is a nasty, horrible place ’cause it didn’t give us everything we cried for’, right? Cryin’ for it wasn’t enough. The thing the sixties did was show us the possibility and the responsibility that we all had. It wasn’t the answer. It just gave us a glimpse of the possibility, and the seventies everybody gone ‘Nya, nya, nya, nya’. And possibly in the eighties everybody’ll say, ‘Well, ok, let’s project the positive side of life again’, you know? The world’s been goin’ on a long time, right? It’s probably gonna go on a long time… ”

After the interview, Sholin boarded a plane back to San Francisco, and John and Yoko went back to work, meeting with producer Jack Douglas. When they returned home that night, they found Mark David Chapman still waiting outside The Dakota with his .38. At 11:15 that night, Lennon was pronounced dead at Roosevelt Hospital.

Monday 10/12/2020 12pm ET: Feature LP: John Lennon – Gimmie Some Truth (2020)

01. John Lennon & Yoko Ono – Instant Karma! (We All Shine On) (Ultimate Mix)
02. Cold Turkey (Ultimate Mix)
03. Working Class Hero (Ultimate Mix)
04. Isolation (Ultimate Mix)
05. Love (Ultimate Mix)
06. God (Ultimate Mix)
07. Power To The People (Ultimate Mix)
08. Imagine (Ultimate Mix)
09. Jealous Guy (Ultimate Mix)
10. Gimme Some Truth (Ultimate Mix)
11. Oh My Love (Ultimate Mix)
12. How Do You Sleep? (Ultimate Mix)
13. Oh Yoko! (Ultimate Mix)
14. John Lennon & Yoko Ono – Angela (Ultimate Mix)
15. Come Together (Live / Ultimate Mix)
16. Mind Games (Ultimate Mix)
17. Out The Blue (Ultimate Mix)
18. I Know (I Know) (Ultimate Mix)
19. Whatever Gets You Thru The Night (Ultimate Mix)
20. Bless You (Ultimate Mix)
21. #9 Dream (Ultimate Mix)
22. Steel And Glass (Ultimate Mix)
23. Stand By Me (Ultimate Mix)
24. Angel Baby (Ultimate Mix)
25. (Just Like) Starting Over (Ultimate Mix)
26. I’m Losing You (Ultimate Mix)
27. Beautiful Boy (Darling Boy) (Ultimate Mix)
28. Watching The Wheels (Ultimate Mix)
29. Woman (Ultimate Mix)
30. Dear Yoko (Ultimate Mix)
31. John Lennon & Yoko Ono – Every Man Has A Woman Who Loves Him (Ultimate Mix)
32. Nobody Told Me (Ultimate Mix)
33. I’m Stepping Out (Ultimate Mix)
34. Grow Old With Me (Ultimate Mix)
35. John Lennon & Yoko Ono – Happy Xmas (War Is Over) (Ultimate Mix)
36. John Lennon & Yoko Ono – Give Peace A Chance (Ultimate Mix)

Friday 6/19/2020 12am ET: Feature LP: John Lennon – Lennon Legend: The Very Best of John Lennon (1997)

Lennon Legend: The Very Best of John Lennon is the third official compilation album of John Lennon’s solo career, coming after 1975’s Shaved Fish and 1982’s The John Lennon Collection.  Because neither collection spanned Lennon’s releases up to and including 1984’s Milk and Honey, Lennon Legend: The Very Best of John Lennon – considered the definitive Lennon retrospective – was compiled to rectify the situation. It was released in the UK October 27, 1997 through Parlophone and early 1998 in the US by EMI Records.

Lennon Legend: The Very Best of John Lennon peaked at number 3 on the UK Albums Chart and certified 2x Platinum by the BPI in May 1998. The album has also certified Platinum in the US and Canada as of December 2008. In the history of Japanese Oricon chart, Lennon Legend has been one of the longest charting albums that failed to reach top 40, selling more than 190,000 copies up to late 2006.

The album re-entered the UK Chart on June 18, 2007, almost ten years after its release, at number 30. The album also appeared in a commercial for Apple’s iPod touch.

“Imagine” – 3:02
“Instant Karma!” – 3:20
“Mother” – 3:53
“Jealous Guy” – 4:14
“Power to the People” – 3:17
“Cold Turkey” – 5:01
“Love” – 3:23
“Mind Games” – 4:11
“Whatever Gets You thru the Night” – 3:19
“#9 Dream” – 4:46
“Stand By Me” – 3:27
“(Just Like) Starting Over” – 3:55
“Woman” – 3:26
“Beautiful Boy (Darling Boy)” – 4:00
“Watching the Wheels” – 3:31
“Nobody Told Me” – 3:33
“Borrowed Time” – 4:30
“Working Class Hero” – 3:49
“Happy Xmas (War Is Over)” – 3:33
“Give Peace a Chance” – 4:52

Wednesday 3pm ET: Feature Year: 1970


January 3 – Former Pink Floyd frontman Syd Barrett releases his first solo album The Madcap Laughs.

January 4 – The Who drummer Keith Moon fatally runs over his chauffer with his Bentley trying to escape a mob outside a pub. The death is later ruled an accident.
January 7 – Max Yasgur, owner of the New York farm where the 1969 Woodstock Festival was held, is sued for $35,000 in property damages by neighboring farmers.
January 14 – Diana Ross and the Supremes perform for the last time together at the Frontier Hotel in Las Vegas.
January 16 – John Lennon’s London art gallery exhibit of lithographs, Bag One, is shut down by Scotland Yard for displaying “erotic lithographs”
January 24 – James Shep Sheppard, of The Heartbeats and Shep and the Limelites, is found murdered in his car on the Long Island Expressway
January 26 – Simon & Garfunkel release their final album together, Bridge Over Troubled Water. The title track and album stay #1 on the Billboard charts for six weeks and go on to win a record six Grammys at the 13th Grammy Awards, including “Record of the Year”, “Song of the Year”, and “Album of the Year.” In Britain it tops the album chart at regular intervals over the next two years, and becomes the best-selling album in Britain during the 1970s.
January 27 – Miles Davis makes the final recordings for his experimental album Circle in the Round, featuring sitar and tabla.
January 28 – The newly formed Band of Gypsies breaks up when guitarist Jimi Hendrix walks out after playing just two songs, telling the audience “I’m sorry we just can’t get it together”.
February 11 – The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr, is premiered in New York City. The film’s soundtrack album, including Badfinger’s “Come and Get It” (written and produced by Paul McCartney), is released on Apple Records.
February 13 – Black Sabbath release their self titled debut album in England.
February 14 – The Who records Live At Leeds in Yorkshire, England. The Grateful Dead plays an equally historic concert on the same date at the Fillmore East, New York City.
February 17 – Joni Mitchell announces that she is retiring from live performances, following her show at London’s Royal Albert Hall. She would be back performing concerts within a year.
February 23 – Ringo Starr appears on the television show Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In.
February 27 – Jefferson Airplane is fined $1,000 for using profanity during a concert in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
February 28 – Led Zeppelin perform in Copenhagen under the pseudonym The Nobs, to avoid a threatened lawsuit by Count Eva von Zeppelin, descendant of airship designer Ferdinand von Zeppelin.
March 4 – Janis Joplin is fined $200 for using obscene language during a concert performance in Tampa, Florida.
March 6 – Cult leader and suspected murderer Charles Manson releases an album titled Lie: The Love and Terror Cult to help finance his defense.
March 15 – West German pavilion at Expo ’70 in Osaka features 5½ hours’ daily live performances of the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen (to September 13).
March 19 – David Bowie marries model Angela Barnett.
March 21 – In Amsterdam, Dana wins the 15th annual Eurovision Song Contest for Ireland with the song “All Kinds of Everything”. She is elected to the European Parliament some 29 years later.
March 25 – José José gives a masterful performance of the song “El Triste” at the “Latin Song Festival II”, predecessor of the OTI Festival.
March 26 – Peter Yarrow (of Peter, Paul and Mary) pleads guilty to “taking immoral liberties” with a 14 year old girl in Washington, D.C., on August 31, 1969
April 2 – The London Magistrate’s Court hears arguments on John Lennon’s indecency summons for his exhibition of erotic lithographs during his art exhibit on January 16.
April 3 – Minneapolis nightclub the Depot opens, eventually renamed to First Avenue.
April 10 – Paul McCartney publicly announces the break-up of The Beatles.
April 14 – Michael Nesmith announces he has left The Monkees
April 17 – Johnny Cash performs at the White House at the invitation of President Richard M. Nixon.
April 20 – Paul McCartney’s first solo album, McCartney, is released.
April 24 – Grace Slick of Jefferson Airplane is invited to a tea party at the White House by Tricia Nixon, daughter of U.S. President Richard Nixon. Slick arrives at the party with Abbie Hoffman, who is on trial for conspiring to riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The pair planned to spike Nixon’s tea cup with a heavy dose of LSD. Slick is recognized (although Hoffman is not) and told to leave because she is on the FBI list.
May 4 – Charles Wuorinen, 32, becomes the youngest composer ever to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music.
May 8 – The Beatles’ last LP, Let It Be, is released.
May 16 – Randy Bachman leaves The Guess Who to start up Bachman–Turner Overdrive.
May 20 – The Beatles’ film Let It Be premières in London and Liverpool. None of the four band members are in attendance at either screening.
May 23 – 24 – Grateful Dead make their first British appearance at Hollywood Festival, Newcastle-under-Lyme, on a bill also featuring Black Sabbath, Free, and Jose Feliciano. Everyone is completely upstaged by the previously unknown Mungo Jerry, whose debut single “In the Summertime” becomes the best-selling hit of the year.
June 13 – “The Long and Winding Road” becomes the Beatles’ last U.S. Number 1 song, though it is never released as a single in Britain. The Stooges play at the Cincinnati Pop Festival.
July 4 – The music countdown show American Top 40 debuts.
July 17 – The Guess Who perform at the White House for President Nixon and his guest The Prince of Wales. At Pat Nixon’s request, they do not play their breakthrough hit “American Woman” due to the song’s supposed anti-American lyrics.
July 26 – Guitarist Jimi Hendrix plays at his hometown of Seattle at Sicks Stadium where, under the influence of drugs, he starts verbally abusing members of the audience.
August 3 – Janis Joplin makes her final TV appearance, on the Dick Cavett Show.
August 26 – August 30 – The Isle of Wight Festival 1970 takes place on East Afton Farm off the coast of England. Some 600,000 people attend the largest rock festival of all time. Artists include Jimi Hendrix, The Who, The Doors, Chicago, Richie Havens, John Sebastian, Joan Baez, Ten Years After, Emerson, Lake & Palmer and Jethro Tull.
August 30 – The Rolling Stones open their European tour in Malmö, Sweden.
September 6 – During his final European tour, guitarist Jimi Hendrix is greeted by booing and jeering by German fans as a result of his late appearance on stage and incoherent stage performance. Bassist Billy Cox quits the tour and returns to the United States.
September 17 – Jimi Hendrix makes his last appearance, with Eric Burdon & War jamming at Ronnie Scotts Club in London. Hendrix, aged 27, dies the following day from a barbiturate overdose at his London hotel.
October 4 – Janis Joplin is found dead in her bedroom. She died from a heroin overdose, at the age of 27.
October 10 – Newly-independent Fiji adopts God Bless Fiji as its national anthem.
October 30 – Jim Morrison of The Doors, found guilty of indecent exposure and profanity because of his behavior during a March 1, 1969 concert, is sentenced to eight months of hard labor and a $500 fine.
November 23 – The Electric Factory concert venue in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania’ closes its doors.
December 8 – John Lennon conducts a lengthy and intensely candid interview with Jann Wenner of Rolling Stone magazine. He discusses his new solo album and the influence of primal therapy on its creation, as well as his personal traumas dating back to childhood. He also makes many revelations about his time in The Beatles, including his account of the group’s breakup. Dalida, still unable to cut a UK record deal, leaves Barclay Records for Orlando Records. Derek Bailey and Evan Parker found Incus Records, specialising in releasing free improvised music and said to be the first independent artist-owned record label. Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew is widely considered the first successful full-fledged fusion of rock and roll and jazz, as well as being one Davis’s best-known albums.

Monday 6 & 8pm ET: RadioMaxMusic Special – John Lennon’s Final Interview

John Lennon’s last days were filled with professional and domestic routines characteristic of both a typical wealthy New Yorker and a legendary rock star and activist: making breakfast and watching Sesame Street with his son Sean, going on epic shopping sprees, spending late nights in the studio, staging demonstrations, arguing with his retinue of servants and hangers-on. After five years in semi-retirement, or “siegelike retreat,” spent raising Sean, John Lennon seemed ready to emerge from seclusion and renew his career. On his final day, December 8, 1980, he was feeling hopeful about his creative future. He had just learned that his album with Yoko, Double Fantasy, had gone gold, and he and Yoko were engaged in promotion, and were looking forward to their next musical endeavor.

That morning, Annie Leibovitz and her assistant came to the Lennon’s apartment building, The Dakota, to shoot those now iconic photographs for Rolling Stone of the Lennons in bed. Meanwhile, a devoted fan named Paul Goresh, and Lennon’s murderer Mark David Chapman, started to hang around outside the building. Less than two hours later, a crew from San Francisco’s RKO radio arrived at The Dakota to interview John and Yoko. Interviewer Dave Sholin remembers meeting Lennon, who was getting dressed after the nude photo shoot: “the door opens and John jumps in with his arms extended, like ‘here I am folks!’ We were meeting John Lennon and we were all maybe a little nervous but that just put us right at ease in probably less than a minute.” “He was a regular guy, very, very sharp and extremely quick witted,” Sholin continued. “And he connected with all of us. He had been out of the public eye for five years and he was open to speaking about anything. He did not hold back.”

You can hear that interview as John and Yoko talk in great detail about Double Fantasy, about parenting, about meeting, falling in love, and working together. Lennon also talks about his social vision and the need for “holistic” solutions to “stop this paranoia of 90-year old men playing macho games with the world and possibly the galaxy.” Notably, he offers his assessment of the cultural shifts from the sixties through the seventies.

The bit about the sixties we were all full of hope and then everybody got depressed and the seventies were terrible – that attitude that everybody has; that the sixties was therefore negated for being naïve and dumb. And the seventies is really where it’s at, which means, you know, putting makeup on and dancing in the disco – which was fine for the seventies – but I don’t negate the sixties. I don’t negate the seventies. The … the seeds that were planted in the sixties – and possibly they were planted generations before – but the seed… whatever happened in the sixties the… the flowering of that is in the feminist, feminization of society. The meditation, the positive learning that people are doing in all walks of life. That is a direct result of the opening up of the sixties. Now, maybe in the sixties we were naïve and like children everybody went back to their room and said, ‘Well, we didn’t get a wonderful world of just flowers and peace and happy chocolate and, and, and it wasn’t just pretty and beautiful all the time’ and that’s what everybody did, ‘we didn’t get everything we wanted’ just like babies and everybody went back to their rooms and sulked. And we’re just gonna play rock and roll and not do anything else . We’re gonna stay in our rooms and the world is a nasty, horrible place ’cause it didn’t give us everything we cried for’, right? Cryin’ for it wasn’t enough. The thing the sixties did was show us the possibility and the responsibility that we all had. It wasn’t the answer. It just gave us a glimpse of the possibility, and the seventies everybody gone ‘Nya, nya, nya, nya’. And possibly in the eighties everybody’ll say, ‘Well, ok, let’s project the positive side of life again’, you know? The world’s been goin’ on a long time, right? It’s probably gonna go on a long time… ”

After the interview, Sholin boarded a plane back to San Francisco, and John and Yoko went back to work, meeting with producer Jack Douglas. When they returned home that night, they found Mark David Chapman still waiting outside The Dakota with his .38. At 11:15 that night, Lennon was pronounced dead at Roosevelt Hospital.

Tuesday 2pm: Sounds of The 80’s

This week on Sounds of The 80s we feature your requests and music from:  Boz Scaggs, John Mellencamp, Reba McEntire, Peter Gabriel, Julian Lennon, John Lennon, Bruce Springsteen, Ramones, Steve Carlisle, Journey and more . . . 

Thursday 10pm: The Beatles: John Lennon / Plastic Ono Band (1970)

John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band is the debut solo album by English musician John Lennon. It was released in 1970, after Lennon had issued three experimental albums with Yoko Ono and Live Peace in Toronto 1969, a live performance in Toronto credited to the Plastic Ono Band. The album was recorded simultaneously with Ono’s debut avant-garde solo album, Yoko Ono/Plastic Ono Band, at Ascot Sound Studios and Abbey Road Studios using the same musicians and production team and nearly identical cover artwork.

John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band is generally considered one of Lennon’s finest solo albums. In 1987, Rolling Stone magazine ranked it fourth in its list “The 100 Best Albums of the Last Twenty Years” and in 2012, ranked it number 23 in “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time”.

“Mother” – 5:34
“Hold On” – 1:52
“I Found Out” – 3:37
“Working Class Hero” – 3:48
“Isolation” – 2:51
“Remember” – 4:33
“Love” – 3:21
“Well Well Well” – 5:59
“Look at Me” – 2:53
“God” – 4:09
“My Mummy’s Dead” – 0:49
“Power to the People” – 3:22
“Do the Oz” – 3:07

Sunday 12pm: Vinyl Resting Place with Willie B

VRPMFP#musicforpeace – Sunday at noon we start our three hour special dedicated to the concept of Music for peace.  Living in the past as I do, I’m linking this to concept of Peace through Understanding – the theme for the 1964-65 world’s fair.  With a special thanks to Marci Geller for coming up with the concept – because we need it now more than ever…  Here are some of the artists featured today.  Jeff Buckley, Tom Clay, Elvis Costello & the Attractions, Glory Rhodes, 5th Dimension, Four Tops, Olivia Newton John, Jimmy Cliff,  John Lennon, Beatles, Chambers Brothers, Isla Grant, Cat Stevens, The New Seekers, Big Sean, Perry Como, Drifters, Temptations, Louis Armstrong, Rodger Whitaker – New World In The Morning — with Marci Geller.

 

Feature Year: 1969 (Part 1 – 9a) (Part 2 – 9p) ET @RadioMax

1969

Today we feature six hours of Hits and Music from 1969.

January 4 – Guitarist Jimi Hendrix is accused of arrogance by British television producers after playing an impromptu version of “Sunshine of Your Love” past his allotted timeslot on the BBC1 show Happening for Lulu.
January 12 – Led Zeppelin’s eponymous debut album released.
January 18 – Pete Best wins his defamation lawsuit against The Beatles. Best had originally sought $8 million, but ended up being awarded much less.
January 30 – The Beatles perform for the last time in public, on the roof of the Apple building at 3 Savile Row, London. The performance, which was filmed for the Let It Be movie, is stopped early by police after neighbors complain about the noise.

February – Eric Burdon & The Animals disband.
February 3 – John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr hire Allen Klein as The Beatles’ new business manager, against the wishes of Paul McCartney.
February 4 – Paul McCartney hires the law firm of Eastman & Eastman, Linda Eastman’s father’s law firm, as general legal counsel for Apple Records.
February 15 – Vickie Jones is arrested for impersonating Aretha Franklin in a concert performance. Jones’ impersonation was so convincing that nobody in the audience asked for a refund.
February 17 – Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan record together in Nashville, Tennessee. Only one song, “Girl from the North Country”, would be released from these sessions.
February 18 – Lulu and Bee Gee Maurice Gibb are married in the UK.
February 24 – Johnny Cash performs “A Boy Named Sue” at California’s San Quentin State Prison

March 1 – During a performance at Miami’s Dinner Key Auditorium, Jim Morrison of the Doors is arrested for allegedly exposing himself during the show. Morrison is officially charged with lewd and lascivious behavior, indecent behavior, open profanity and public drunkenness.
March 12 – The 11th Grammy Awards are presented. Paul McCartney marries Linda Eastman in London. George Harrison and his wife Pattie are arrested in the UK on charges of hashish possession.
March 20 – John Lennon marries Yoko Ono in Gibraltar.
March 25-31 – John Lennon and Yoko Ono host a “Bed-In” for peace in their room at the Amsterdam Hilton, turning their honeymoon into an antiwar event. Lennon also learns from a morning newspaper that publisher Dick James has sold his shares of Northern Songs to Lew Grade’s Associated Television (ATV).
March 26 -Lotti Golden records her debut LP Motor-Cycle (Atlantic SD 8223) at Atlantic Studios in New York City, featured in Newsweek (July 1969).
March 29 – At the 14th annual Eurovision Song Contest held at the Teatro Real, Madrid, Spain, the final result is a four-way tie for first place between Spain (“Vivo cantando” – Salomé); United Kingdom (“Boom Bang-a-Bang” – Lulu); Netherlands (“De Troubadour” – Lenny Kuhr) and France (“Un jour, un enfant” – Frida Boccara). As there was no tie-break rule in force up to this time, the four entries involved, who each scored 18 points, are declared ex-aequo winners.

April 1 – The Beach Boys file a lawsuit against their record label, Capitol Records, for $2,041,446.64 in unpaid royalties and producer’s fees for Brian Wilson. Capitol retaliates by deleting most of its Beach Boys catalog, severely limiting the band’s income.
April 8 – Opening for Ten Years After at the Fillmore East in New York City, Family perform their first U.S. concert, and the show is an unmitigated disaster. Vocalist Roger Chapman, on his 27th birthday, throws a microphone stand into the audience, unintentionally in the direction of Fillmore East impresario Bill Graham.
April 20 – The L.A. Free Festival in Venice, California ends early following a riot of audience members, 117 of which were arrested.
April 22 – The first complete performance of The Who’s rock opera Tommy during a performance in Dolton, Devon, UK John Lennon officially changes his name from John Winston Lennon to John Winston Ono-Lennon.
April 24 – The Beatles make a $5.1 million counter offer to the Northern Songs stockholders in an attempt to keep Associated TV from controlling the band’s music.
April 28 – Chicago releases its debut album, The Chicago Transit Authority.

May 3 – Sly & the Family Stone release their breakthrough album, Stand!, which became one of the top-selling albums of the decade and made the band one of the most popular acts in rock and soul music.
Jimi Hendrix is arrested by Canadian Mounties at Toronto’s International Airport for possession of narcotics. Hendrix is released on $10,000 bail.
May 6 – In London, representatives of Warner Brothers-Seven Arts discuss the purchase of fifteen percent of The Beatles’ Northern Songs.
May 10 – The Turtles perform at the White House. Singer Mark Volman falls off the stage five times.

June 2 – John Lennon and Yoko Ono host a “Bed-In” at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal, Canada. The couple records the song “Give Peace a Chance” live in their suite with Tommy Smothers, Timothy Leary, and several others.
June 12 – 25 – First Annual Rock & Roll Revival fifth estate Performers include amongst others MC5, Johnny Winter, Chuck Berry, Dr. John, Sun Ra, David Peel, The Stooges, Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band
June 13 – Mick Taylor joins the Rolling Stones.
June 29 – Bass player Noel Redding announces to the media that he has quit the Jimi Hendrix Experience, having effectively done so during the recording of Electric Ladyland.

July 3 – Brian Jones is found dead in the swimming pool at his home in Sussex, England, almost a month after leaving The Rolling Stones.
July 5 – The Rolling Stones proceed with a free concert in Hyde Park, London, as a tribute to Brian Jones; it is also the band’s first concert with guitarist Mick Taylor. Estimates of the audience range from 250,000 to 400,000.
July 31 – Elvis Presley returns to live performances in Las Vegas. The engagement ends on August 28.

August 9 – Members of would-be folk singer Charles Manson’s “family” murder film star Sharon Tate and others, in Tate’s home.
August 15-17 – The Woodstock Music and Art Festival is held at Max Yasgur’s dairy farm in Bethel, New York, near Woodstock, New York. Performers include Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, The Who, Joan Baez, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Jefferson Airplane, Santana, Country Joe and the Fish, Ten Years After, and Sly & the Family Stone.
August 21-24 – The Bilzen Jazz and Pop Festival is held in Bilzen, Belgium. Performers include Deep Purple, Shocking Blue, The Moody Blues, Soft Machine, Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, The Move and The Blossom Toes.
August 30-31 – The Isle of Wight Festival is held in Wootton Bridge. Performers include amongst others The Band, Blodwyn Pig, Edgar Broughton Band, Joe Cocker, Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, Bob Dylan, Family, The Who, Free, Mighty Baby, The Moody Blues, The Nice, The Pretty Things, Third Ear Band.

September 13 – John Lennon and Plastic Ono Band perform at the Toronto Rock and Roll Revival 12-hour music festival, backed by Eric Clapton, Klaus Voormann and Alan White. Other performers on the bill include Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis and up-and-comers Chicago. It is Lennon’s first-ever public rock performance without one or more of The Beatles since meeting Paul McCartney in 1957. He decides before returning to the UK to leave The Beatles permanently.
September 24 – Deep Purple and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra perform the Concerto for Group and Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in London, in the first elaborate collaboration between a rock band and an orchestra.

October 14 – The final single by Diana Ross & The Supremes, “Someday We’ll Be Together”, is released. The single becomes the final #1 hit of 1969 (and of the 1960s). After a farewell concert in January 1970, Diana Ross leaves the Supremes for a solo career.
October 18 – Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band Live at the Fillmore East, NY

November – Simon & Garfunkel give live concert at Iowa State University, where they record the track “Bye, Bye Love” for their upcoming album, Bridge Over Troubled Water.
November 1 – After seven years off the top of the charts, Elvis Presley hits No. 1 on the Billboard chart with “Suspicious Minds”.
November 7 – The Rolling Stones open their US tour in Fort Collins, Colorado.
November 8 – Simon & Garfunkel, on tour for the first time with a band, give live concert in Carbondale, Illinois, presumably at Southern Illinois University. The concert is not released until 1999 as part of a recording compiled by Head Records, called Village Vanguard.
November 11 – Simon & Garfunkel give live concert at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. The recording is later released in the 1990s as Back to College on Yellow Dog Records and A Time of Innocence on Bell Bottom Records.
November 15 – Musik für die Beethovenhalle in Bonn, a multi-auditorium retrospective concert of the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen, with the world premiere of his Fresco presented in four different foyer spaces continuously over a span of four-and-a-half hours.
November 29 – Billboard Magazine changes its policy of charting the A and B sides of 45 singles on its pop chart. The former policy charted the two sides separately, but the new policy considers both sides as one chart entry. The Beatles are the first beneficiary of the new policy as their current 45 single featuring “Come Together” on one side, and “Something” on the other, accrue enough combined points to make the single a #1 pop hit. Similarly, Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son” and “Down On The Corner” accrue enough combined points to reach #3 three weeks later.
November 30 – Simon & Garfunkel air TV special Songs of America, ostensibly an hour-long show that is anti-war and anti-poverty featuring live footage from their 1969 tour.

December – The Jackson 5 release their debut album, Diana Ross Presents The Jackson 5.
December 6 – Altamont Free Concert
Zubin Mehta marries Nancy Kovack.
Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash perform together on The Johnny Cash Show.
Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker & Steve Winwood form Blind Faith.
Brian Eno’s musical career begins as a member of Cornelius Cardew’s Scratch Orchestra.

Feature Year: 1974 – 9am ET

1974January 3 – Bob Dylan and The Band kick off their 40-date concert tour at Chicago Stadium. It’s Dylan’s first time on the road since 1966.
January 17 – Joni Mitchell releases her monumental album Court and Spark, supported by the single “Help Me” reaching the highest moment of commercial success. Dino Martin, singer and son of Dean Martin, is arrested on suspicion of possession and sale of two machine guns.
February 10 – record producer Phil Spector is badly injured in a car accident. Details of the accident are kept secret.
February 12 – New York’s rock club, Bottom Line, opens in Greenwich Village. The first headlining act is Dr. John.
February 14 – The Captain & Tennille are married in Virginia City, Nevada.
February 16 – Two years of litigation between Grand Funk and former manager Terry Knight are finally resolved. The band gets the rights to its name but Knight wins a cash settlement.
February 18 – Yes sells out the first of two nights at Madison Square Garden, without a bit of advertising for the show. Kiss releases their self-titled debut album.
February 19 – The first American Music Awards are broadcast on ABC, two weeks before the Grammys.
February 20 – Cher files for divorce from her husband of 10 years, Sonny Bono.
March 12 – John Lennon is involved in an altercation with a photographer outside The Troubadour in Los Angeles, California. Lennon and friend Harry Nilsson have been heckling comedian Tommy Smothers and are forced to leave the club.
March 16 – Country music’s Grand Ole Opry moves to a new location at the Opryland USA theme park in Nashville, Tennessee
March 30 – The Ramones play their first concert at the Performance Studio in New York.
April 5 – Van Halen play their first gig on the Sunset Strip in Hollywood at Gazzarri’s.
April 6 – 200,000 music fans attend The California Jam rock festival. Artists performing at the event include Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Black Oak Arkansas, and the Eagles. Swedish group ABBA wins the 19th Eurovision Song Contest in The Dome, Brighton, England, with the song “Waterloo”, kickstarting their stellar international career.
April 14 – Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones, a concert movie filmed during the band’s 1972 North American Tour, premieres at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York.
April 16 – Queen play their first North American concert, opening for Mott the Hoople in Denver, Colorado.
April 25 – Pam Morrison, Jim Morrison’s widow, is found dead in her Hollywood apartment from an apparent heroin overdose.
May 7 – Led Zeppelin announces their new record label, Swan Song Records, with a lavish party at The Four Seasons Hotel in New York.
May 25 – Twenty years after it was recorded, “Rock Around the Clock” by Bill Haley and His Comets returns to the Billboard Top 40, after it gains renewed popularity from its use in the film American Graffiti and the TV series Happy Days.
May 28 – Experimental orchestra, the Portsmouth Sinfonia, plays a concert at the Royal Albert Hall, with its regular conductor John Farley. The performers included Michael Nyman and Brian Eno.
June 5 – Patti Smith records “Hey Joe”, her debut single which arguably becomes the first punk rock single when released in August.
June 14 – David Bowie launches his Diamond Dogs tour at the Montreal Forum. One year previously Bowie had announced he was retiring from touring as Ziggy Stardust.
July 4 – Barry White marries Love Unlimited lead singer Glodean James.
July 19-21 – Ozark Music Festival is held in Sedalia, Missouri with a crowd estimated between 100,000 to 350,000 people.
July 20 – The first Knebworth Concert is held in England, headlined by The Allman Brothers Band.
July 29 – Having performed at two sold-out concerts at the London Palladium, ‘Mama’ Cass Elliot dies in her sleep after suffering a heart attack in a Mayfair flat in London, aged 32. Neil Peart officially joins Rush.
August 7 – Peter Wolf, lead singer of The J. Geils Band, marries actress Faye Dunaway.
August 17 – Ramones make their CBGB debut. The venue would help establish their place at the forefront of punk rock.
September 15 – Gary Thain of Uriah Heep is shocked on stage at the Moody Coliseum in Dallas, Texas and is seriously injured.
October 5 – AC/DC performs its first official show with Bon Scott as its new lead singer.
October 18 – Al Green is attacked in the shower by a girlfriend. She scalds his body with a pan of boiling grits and commits suicide a few moments later.
November 2 – George Harrison launches his “George Harrison & Friends North American Tour” in Vancouver. It’s Harrison’s first tour since the Beatles North American Tour of 1966.
November 21 – Wilson Pickett is arrested in Andes, New York after allegedly firing a bullet through the door of a hotel room he was staying at while on a hunting trip with The Isley Brothers.
November 28 – John Lennon joins Elton John on stage at Madison Square Garden for three songs. It would be Lennon’s last stage performance.
December 12 – Mick Taylor leaves The Rolling Stones after 6 years.
December 31 – Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks join Fleetwood Mac. The third annual New Year’s Rockin’ Eve, moving this year from NBC to ABC, is aired with performances by Herbie Hancock, The Beach Boys, Chicago, Olivia Newton-John and The Doobie Brothers.

Feature Year: 1974 9am ET

1974January 3 – Bob Dylan and The Band kick off their 40-date concert tour at Chicago Stadium. It’s Dylan’s first time on the road since 1966.
January 17 – Joni Mitchell releases her monumental album Court and Spark, supported by the single “Help Me” reaching the highest moment of commercial success.  Dino Martin, singer and son of Dean Martin, is arrested on suspicion of possession and sale of two machine guns.
February 10 – record producer Phil Spector is badly injured in a car accident. Details of the accident are kept secret.
February 12 – New York’s rock club, Bottom Line, opens in Greenwich Village. The first headlining act is Dr. John.
February 14 – The Captain & Tennille are married in Virginia City, Nevada.
February 16 – Two years of litigation between Grand Funk and former manager Terry Knight are finally resolved. The band gets the rights to its name but Knight wins a cash settlement.
February 18 – Yes sells out the first of two nights at Madison Square Garden, without a bit of advertising for the show.  Kiss releases their self-titled debut album.
February 19 – The first American Music Awards are broadcast on ABC, two weeks before the Grammys.
February 20 – Cher files for divorce from her husband of 10 years, Sonny Bono.
March 12 – John Lennon is involved in an altercation with a photographer outside The Troubadour in Los Angeles, California. Lennon and friend Harry Nilsson have been heckling comedian Tommy Smothers and are forced to leave the club.
March 16 – Country music’s Grand Ole Opry moves to a new location at the Opryland USA theme park in Nashville, Tennessee
March 30 – The Ramones play their first concert at the Performance Studio in New York.
April 5 – Van Halen play their first gig on the Sunset Strip in Hollywood at Gazzarri’s.
April 6 – 200,000 music fans attend The California Jam rock festival. Artists performing at the event include Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Black Oak Arkansas, and the Eagles.  Swedish group ABBA wins the 19th Eurovision Song Contest in The Dome, Brighton, England, with the song “Waterloo”, kickstarting their stellar international career.
April 14 – Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones, a concert movie filmed during the band’s 1972 North American Tour, premieres at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York.
April 16 – Queen play their first North American concert, opening for Mott the Hoople in Denver, Colorado.
April 25 – Pam Morrison, Jim Morrison’s widow, is found dead in her Hollywood apartment from an apparent heroin overdose.
May 7 – Led Zeppelin announces their new record label, Swan Song Records, with a lavish party at The Four Seasons Hotel in New York.
May 25 – Twenty years after it was recorded, “Rock Around the Clock” by Bill Haley and His Comets returns to the Billboard Top 40, after it gains renewed popularity from its use in the film American Graffiti and the TV series Happy Days.
May 28 – Experimental orchestra, the Portsmouth Sinfonia, plays a concert at the Royal Albert Hall, with its regular conductor John Farley. The performers included Michael Nyman and Brian Eno.
June 5 – Patti Smith records “Hey Joe”, her debut single which arguably becomes the first punk rock single when released in August.
June 14 – David Bowie launches his Diamond Dogs tour at the Montreal Forum. One year previously Bowie had announced he was retiring from touring as Ziggy Stardust.
July 4 – Barry White marries Love Unlimited lead singer Glodean James.
July 19-21 – Ozark Music Festival is held in Sedalia, Missouri with a crowd estimated between 100,000 to 350,000 people.
July 20 – The first Knebworth Concert is held in England, headlined by The Allman Brothers Band.
July 29 – Having performed at two sold-out concerts at the London Palladium, ‘Mama’ Cass Elliot dies in her sleep after suffering a heart attack in a Mayfair flat in London, aged 32.  Neil Peart officially joins Rush.
August 7 – Peter Wolf, lead singer of The J. Geils Band, marries actress Faye Dunaway.
August 17 – Ramones make their CBGB debut. The venue would help establish their place at the forefront of punk rock.
September 15 – Gary Thain of Uriah Heep is shocked on stage at the Moody Coliseum in Dallas, Texas and is seriously injured.
October 5 – AC/DC performs its first official show with Bon Scott as its new lead singer.
October 18 – Al Green is attacked in the shower by a girlfriend. She scalds his body with a pan of boiling grits and commits suicide a few moments later.
November 2 – George Harrison launches his “George Harrison & Friends North American Tour” in Vancouver. It’s Harrison’s first tour since the Beatles North American Tour of 1966.
November 21 – Wilson Pickett is arrested in Andes, New York after allegedly firing a bullet through the door of a hotel room he was staying at while on a hunting trip with The Isley Brothers.
November 28 – John Lennon joins Elton John on stage at Madison Square Garden for three songs. It would be Lennon’s last stage performance.
December 12 – Mick Taylor leaves The Rolling Stones after 6 years.
December 31 – Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks join Fleetwood Mac. 

Feature LP: Billy Joel – My Lives Box Set (2005) 12pm ET

My Lives is a box set compilation of demos, outtakes, B-sides, soundtrack cuts, live recordings and album cuts by American singer/songwriter Billy Joel.  It was released on November 22, 2005. The album name is derivative of the Billy Joel song “My Life.” The liner notes were written by long time Rolling Stone magazine contributor Anthony DeCurtis.  It was Joel’s 20th album to chart on the Billboard 200, peaking at #171 in December 2005.

 

Disc One

  1. “My Journey’s End” – The Lost Souls (Demo, Never Released) – 2:07
  2. “Time And Time Again” – The Lost Souls (Demo, Never Released) – 2:00
  3. “Every Step I Take (Every Move I Make)” – The Hassles (Album Version) (William Joel, T. Michaels, V. Gorman) – 2:28
  4. “You’ve Got Me Hummin'” – The Hassles (Album Version) (Isaac HayesDavid Porter) – 2:28
  5. “Amplifier Fire (Part 1)” – Attila (Heavily Edited) (William Joel, Jonathan Small) – 3:06
  6. “Only A Man” (Demo, Never Released) – 3:16
  7. She’s Got a Way” (Album Version) – 2:56
  8. “Oyster Bay” (Demo, Never Released) – 3:44
  9. Piano Man” (Demo, Never Released) – 2:52
  10. “The Siegfried Line” (Demo, Never Released) – 2:35
  11. “New Mexico” (Demo, Never Released) (Became “Worse Comes To Worst“) – 2:37
  12. “Cross To Bear” (Demo, Never Released) – 4:20
  13. “Miami 2017” (Demo, Never Released) – 4:50
  14. “These Rhinestone Days” (Demo, Never Released) (Became “I’ve Loved These Days“) – 3:00
  15. “Everybody Has A Dream” (Album Version) – 4:36
  16. Only the Good Die Young” (Alternate Version, Never Released) – 3:39
  17. Until the Night” (Album Version) – 6:38
  18. “Zanzibar” (Album Version, Unfaded) – 6:47
  19. It’s Still Rock & Roll to Me” (Album Version) – 2:58

Disc Two

  1. Captain Jack” (Live Version, Never Released) – 7:22
  2. “The End of the World” (Demo, Never Released) (Became “Elvis Presley Blvd.”) – 3:22
  3. “The Prime of Your Life” (Demo, Never Released) (Became “The Longest Time“) – 3:43
  4. “She’s Right on Time” (Album Version) – 4:14
  5. “Elvis Presley Blvd.” (B-Side of Allentown) – 3:15
  6. “Nobody Knows But Me” (from In Harmony II) – 2:55
  7. An Innocent Man” (Album Version) – 5:19
  8. “Christie Lee” (Demo, Never Released) – 4:02
  9. “Easy Money” (Album Version) – 4:06
  10. And So It Goes” (Demo, Never Released) – 3:14
  11. I’ll Cry Instead” (Live, B-Side of An Innocent Man) (John LennonPaul McCartney) – 2:25
  12. Keeping the Faith” (Unrealeased Dance Remix) – 4:54 Incorrectly listed as the 12″ Remix, which originally ran for 5:27
  13. Modern Woman” (Album Version) – 3:51
  14. Baby Grand” duet with Ray Charles (Album Version) – 4:05
  15. “Getting Closer” duet with Steve Winwood (Alternate Version, Never released) – 5:39
  16. “House of Blue Light” (B-Side of “We Didn’t Start the Fire“) – 4:45
  17. “Money or Love” (Demo, Never Released) – 4:02
  18. The Times They Are A-Changin’” (Live Album Version) (Bob Dylan) – 2:54

Disc Three

  1. The Downeaster” “Alexa”” (Album Version) – 3:45
  2. I Go to Extremes” (Live, Never Released) – 4:53
  3. Shout” (Live) (O’Kelley IsleyRonald IsleyRudolph Isley) – 5:50
  4. All Shook Up” (B-side) (Otis BlackwellElvis Presley) – 2:09
  5. Heartbreak Hotel” (Soundtrack) (May Boren AxtonTommy DurdenElvis Presley) – 3:21
  6. When You Wish Upon a Star” (Soundtrack) (Leigh HarlineNed Washington) – 3:42
  7. In a Sentimental Mood” (Soundtrack) (Duke EllingtonManny KurtzIrving Mills) – 4:02
  8. “Motorcycle Song” (Demo, Never Released) (Became “All About Soul“) – 4:19
  9. “You Picked A Real Bad Time” (B-side) – 4:56
  10. The River of Dreams” (Alternate Version, Never Released) – 5:49
  11. A Hard Day’s Night” (Live) (John LennonPaul McCartney) – 2:47
  12. “Light As The Breeze” (Album Version) (Leonard Cohen) – 6:14
  13. To Make You Feel My Love” (Album Version) (Bob Dylan) – 3:52
  14. “Hey Girl” (Album Version) (Gerry GoffinCarole King) – 3:57
  15. “Why Should I Worry” (Soundtrack) (Dan HartmanCharlie Midnight) – 3:33
  16. “Where Were You (On Our Wedding Day?)” (Soundtrack) (Harold LoganJohn PattonLloyd Price) – 1:58
  17. “Highway 61 Revisited” (Demo, Never Released) (Bob Dylan) – 5:11

Disc Four

  1. Movin’ Out (Anthony’s Song)” (Live) – 3:44
  2. You May Be Right” duet with Elton John (Live, Never Released) – 4:50
  3. Big Shot” (Live) – 4:45
  4. Don’t Worry Baby” (Live) (Roger Christin, Brian Wilson) – 3:27
  5. Goodnight Saigon” – Vietnam Veterans Version (Live) – 6:30
  6. “Los Angelenos” (Live 1980) – 3:54
  7. New York State of Mind” (Live) – 6:01
  8. “Opus 1. Soliloquy (On A Separation)” – 11:22
  9. “Opus 8. Suite For Piano (Star-Crossed) I. Innamorato” – 7:46
  10. “Opus 8. Suite For Piano (Star-Crossed) II. Sorbetto” – 1:31
  11. “Opus 8. Suite For Piano (Star-Crossed) III. Delusion” – 3:35
  12. “Elegy: The Great Peconic” – 6:51
  13. “Glass Houses Promo Talk” – 9:00

Disc Five (DVD)

Live from the River of Dreams Tour:
  1. No Man’s Land
  2. Pressure
  3. The Ballad of Billy the Kid
  4. Leningrad
  5. Allentown
  6. My Life
  7. I Go to Extremes
  8. “Shades Of Grey”
  9. The River of Dreams
  10. Goodnight Saigon
  11. We Didn’t Start the Fire
  12. A Hard Day’s Night
  13. Big Shot
  14. Piano Man
  15. I Go to Extremes” – “Umixit” Track
  16. “Zanzibar” – “Umixit” Track