Tag: John Denver

Tuesday 2pm ET: Feature Artist – John Denver

Henry John Deutschendorf Jr. (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), known professionally as John Denver, was an American singer-songwriter, record producer, actor, activist, and humanitarian, whose greatest commercial success was as a solo singer. After traveling and living in numerous locations while growing up in his military family, Denver began his music career with folk music groups during the late 1960s. Starting in the 1970s, he was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the decade and one of its best-selling artists. By 1974, he was one of America’s best-selling performers, and AllMusic has described Denver as “among the most beloved entertainers of his era”.

Denver recorded and released approximately 300 songs, about 200 of which he composed, with total sales of over 33 million records worldwide. He recorded and performed primarily with an acoustic guitar and sang about his joy in nature, his disdain for city life, his enthusiasm for music, and his relationship trials. Denver’s music appeared on a variety of charts, including country music, the Billboard Hot 100, and adult contemporary, in all earning 12 gold and four platinum albums with his signature songs “Take Me Home, Country Roads”, “Annie’s Song”, “Rocky Mountain High”, “Calypso”, “Thank God I’m a Country Boy”, and “Sunshine on My Shoulders”.

Denver appeared in several films and television specials during the 1970s and 1980s. He continued to record in the 1990s, also focusing on environmental issues by lending vocal support to space exploration and testifying in front of Congress in protest against censorship in music. He lived in Aspen for much of his life where he was known for his love of Colorado. In 1974, Denver was named poet laureate of the state. The Colorado state legislature also adopted “Rocky Mountain High” as one of its two state songs in 2007.

An avid pilot, Denver died at the age of 53 in a single-fatality crash while piloting his recently purchased light plane.

Denver was killed on October 12, 1997, when his experimental Rutan Long-EZ plane, aircraft registration number N555JD, crashed into Monterey Bay near Pacific Grove, California, while making a series of touch-and-go landings at the nearby Monterey Peninsula Airport. He was the only occupant of the aircraft. Identification was not possible using dental records so only his fingerprints confirmed the pilot was Denver. The official cause of death was multiple blunt force trauma resulting from the crash.

Denver was a pilot with over 2,700 hours of experience. He had pilot ratings for single-engine land and sea, multi-engine land, glider and instrument. He also held a type rating in his Learjet. He had recently purchased the Long-EZ aircraft, made by someone else from a kit, and had taken a half-hour checkout flight with the aircraft the day before his accident.

Denver was not legally permitted to fly at the time of the crash. In previous years, Denver had a number of drunk driving arrests. In 1996, nearly a year before the accident, the Federal Aviation Administration learned that Denver had failed to maintain sobriety by failing to refrain entirely from alcohol and revoked his medical certification. However, the accident was not influenced by alcohol use since an autopsy found no sign of alcohol or other drugs in Denver’s body.

Post-accident investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) showed that the leading cause of the accident was Denver’s inability to switch fuel tanks during flight. The quantity of fuel had been depleted during the plane’s flight to Monterey and in several brief practice takeoffs and landings Denver performed at the airport immediately prior to the final flight. His newly purchased experimental Rutan had an unusual fuel tank selector valve handle configuration. The selector valve handle had been intended by the plane’s designer to be located between the pilot’s legs. The builder instead had placed it behind the pilot’s left shoulder. The fuel gauge was also placed behind the pilot’s seat and not visible to the person at the controls. An NTSB interview with the aircraft mechanic servicing Denver’s plane revealed that he and Denver had discussed the inaccessibility of the cockpit fuel selector valve handle and its resistance to being turned.

Before the flight, Denver and the mechanic had attempted to extend the reach of the handle, using a pair of Vise-Grip pliers. However, this did not solve the problem and the pilot still could not reach the handle while strapped into his seat. NTSB officials’ post-accident investigation showed that because of the positioning of the fuel selector valves, switching fuel tanks required the pilot to turn his body 90 degrees to reach the valve. This created a natural tendency to extend one’s right foot against the right rudder pedal to support oneself while turning in the seat, which caused the aircraft to yaw (nose right) and pitch up.

The mechanic said he remarked to Denver that the fuel sight gauges were visible only to the rear cockpit occupant. Denver had asked how much fuel was shown. He told Denver there was “less than half in the right tank and less than a quarter in the left tank”. He then provided Denver with an inspection mirror so he could look over his shoulder at the fuel gauges. The mirror was later recovered in the wreckage. Denver said he would use the autopilot inflight to hold the airplane level while he turned the fuel selector valve. He turned down an offer to refuel, saying he would be flying for about an hour.

The NTSB interviewed 20 witnesses about Denver’s last flight. Six of them had seen the plane crash into the bay near Point Pinos. Four witnesses stated the aircraft was originally heading west. Five said they saw the plane in a steep bank, with four of them saying the bank was to the right (north). Twelve witnesses described seeing the aircraft in a steep nose-down descent. Witnesses estimated the plane’s altitude at between 350 and 500 feet (110 and 150 m) when heading toward the shoreline. Eight said that they heard a “pop” or “backfire”, accompanied by a reduction in the engine noise level just before the airplane crashed into the sea.

In addition to Denver’s failing to refuel and his subsequent loss of control while attempting to switch fuel tanks, the NTSB determined there were other key factors that led to the accident. Foremost among these was his inadequate transition training on this type of aircraft and the builder’s decision to locate the fuel selector handle in a difficult-to-reach location. The board issued recommendations on the requirement and enforcement of mandatory training standards for pilots operating experimental aircraft. It also emphasized the importance of mandatory ease of access to all controls, including fuel selectors and fuel gauges, in all aircraft.

Friday 11pm: Top 100 Albums of The 70’s – #93 – An Evening With John Denver (1975)

Top 100 Albums of The 70’s

#93 – An Evening With John Denver (1975)

An Evening with John Denver is the first live album by American singer and songwriter John Denver. It was recorded at the Universal Amphitheatre in Los Angeles, California in August and September 1974. He was backed by an orchestra conducted by Lee Holdridge. Denver’s manager, Milton Okun, was the album’s music producer. Released February 1975

1. “The Music Is You” 1:02
2. “Farewell Andromeda (Welcome to My Morning)” 3:40
3. “Mother Nature’s Son” 4:37
4. “Summer” 3:02
5. “Today” 4:40
6. “Saturday Night In Toledo, Ohio” 4:08

1. “Matthew” 3:42
2. “Rocky Mountain Suite (Cold Nights in Canada)” 3:13
3. “Sweet Surrender” 5:02
4. “Grandma’s Feather Bed” 2:37
5. “Annie’s Song” 3:32
6. “The Eagle and the Hawk” 2:22

1. “My Sweet Lady” 4:55
2. “Annie’s Other Song” 3:05
3. “Boy from the Country” 5:00
4. “Rhymes & Reasons” 3:17
5. “Forest Lawn” 2:58

1. “Pickin’ the Sun Down” 2:17
2. “Thank God I’m a Country Boy” 3:40
3. “Take Me Home, Country Roads” 3:17
4. “Poems, Prayers and Promises” 4:40
5. “Rocky Mountain High” 5:04
6. “This Old Guitar” 4:47

Vinyl Resting Place with Willie B 12pm ET

vrp0515Join Willie B for another edition of the Vinyl Resting Place.  

Well with the Vinyl Resting Place back on the air (or wires) – I thought we’d give a random sampling of some of the music and silliness my loyal listeners (both of them) have come to expect. this week’s line-up..

Jefferson Airplane, Billy Sawn, Carpenters, Gunhill Road, Lois Fletcher, Bruce Springsteen, Albert Hammond, Lori Lieberman, Roger Whittaker, Neil Diamond, John Denver, Normam Greenbaum,  Electric Light Orchestra & Olivia Newton John, Elvis Presley, Horst Jankowski, Lady Gaga, Karmin, Smiley Lewis, Lloyd Price,  Billy Joel and LOTS more.  ..  12pm ET on RadioMaxMusic

 

Sounds of The 70s with Dan Varroney 9am ET

Dan VarroneyJoin Dan Varroney with Sounds of the 70s today at 9:00 featuring the hits from this week in 1971, 1974, & 1979, including, Lou Rawls, Coven, Doobie Brothers, Undisputed Truth, Cher, Olivia Newton John, Andy Kim, Eric Clapton, John Denver, The Knack, Crystal Gayle,  Sammy Johns, Kiki Dee, Robert John, Night, Donna Summer & Chic. We’ll also feature Hamilton, Joe, Frank & Reynolds, Doobie Brothers, and John Denver. 

Vinyl Resting Place with Willie B 4pm ET #vrp (John Denver)

john-denverHenry John Deutschendorf, Jr. (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), known professionally as John Denver, was an American singer-songwriter, actor, activist and humanitarian, whose greatest commercial success was as a solo singer, starting in the 1970s. He was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the decade and one of its best-selling artists. By 1974, he was firmly established as America’s best-selling performer, and AllMusic has described Denver as “among the most beloved entertainers of his era”. After traveling and living in numerous locations while growing up in his military family, Denver began his music career in folk music groups in the late 1960s. Throughout his life, Denver recorded and released approximately 300 songs, about 200 of which he composed, with total sales of over 33 million.

He recorded and performed primarily with an acoustic guitar and sang about his joy in nature, his enthusiasm for music, and his relationship trials. Denver’s music appeared on a variety of charts, including country and western, the Billboard Hot 100, and adult contemporary, in all earning him twelve gold and four platinum albums with his signature songs “Take Me Home, Country Roads”, “Annie’s Song”, “Rocky Mountain High”, and “Sunshine on My Shoulders”.

Denver further starred in films and several notable television specials in the 1970s and 1980s. In the following decade, he continued to record, but also focused on calling attention to environmental issues, lent his vocal support to space exploration, and testified in front of Congress to protest against censorship in music. He was known for his love of the state of Colorado, which he sang about numerous times. He lived in Aspen, Colorado, for much of his life. He was named Poet Laureate of the state in 1974. The Colorado state legislature also adopted “Rocky Mountain High” as one of its state songs in 2007. Denver was an avid pilot, and died in a single-fatality crash of his personal aircraft at the age of 53. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Artist Countdown: John Denver Top 40 Hits 2pm ET @RadioMax

john-denverHenry John Deutschendorf, Jr. (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), known professionally as John Denver, was an American singer, songwriter, activist, and humanitarian. He was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the 1970s. After traveling and living in numerous locations while growing up in his military family, Denver began his music career in folk music groups in the late 1960s. His greatest commercial success was as a solo singer, starting in the 1970s. Throughout his life, Denver recorded and released approximately 300 songs, about 200 of which he composed. He performed primarily with an acoustic guitar and sang about his joy in nature, his enthusiasm for music, and his relationship trials. Denver’s music appeared on a variety of charts, including country and western, the Billboard Hot 100, and adult contemporary, in all earning him twelve gold and four platinum albums with his signature songs “Take Me Home, Country Roads“, “Annie’s Song“, “Rocky Mountain High“, and “Sunshine on My Shoulders“.

Denver further starred in films and several notable television specials in the 1970s and 1980s. In the following decades, he continued to record, but also focused on calling attention to environmental issues, lent his vocal support to space exploration, and testified in front of Congress to protest against censorship in music. He was known for his love of the state of Colorado, which he sang about numerous times. He lived in Aspen, Colorado, for much of his life, and influenced the governor to name him Poet Laureate of the state in 1974. The Colorado state legislature also adopted “Rocky Mountain High” as one of its state songs in 2007. Denver was an avid pilot, and died in his personal aircraft at the age of 53. (Source: Wikipedia)

1 I’m Sorry
2 Thank God I’m a Country Boy
3 Annie’s Song
4 Back Home Again
5 Fly Away (with Olivia Newton-John)
6 Sweet Surrender
7 Take Me Home, Country Roads
8 How Can I Leave You Again
9 Like a Sad Song
10 Looking for Space
11 Sunshine on My Shoulders
12 Some Days Are Diamonds (Some Days Are Stone)
13 Rocky Mountain High
14 It Makes Me Giggle
15 My Sweet Lady
16 Wild Montana Skies (with Emmylou Harris)
17 Dreamland Express
18 Baby, You Look Good to Me Tonight
19 Friends with You
20 Anthem-Revelation
21 It Amazes Me
22 Shanghai Breezes
23 I Want to Live
24 Autograph
25 I’d Rather Be a Cowboy
26 Everyday
27 Seasons of the Heart
28 Goodbye Again
29 Farewell Andromeda (Welcome to My Morning)
30 Love Again (with Sylvie Vartan)
31 Calypso
32 Garden Song
33 And So It Goes (with Nitty Gritty Dirt Band)
34 Hard Life, Hard Times (Prisoners)
35 Perhaps Love (with Plácido Domingo)
36 The Cowboy and the Lady
37 Dancing with the Mountains
38 Don’t Close Your Eyes, Tonight
39 For You
40 Along for the Ride (’56 T-Bird)