Tag: Jim Steinman

Wednesday 4/21/21 1am ET: Feature LP: Meat Loaf – Bat Out of Hell II: Back into Hell (1993)

Bat Out of Hell II: Back into Hell is the sixth studio album by American rock singer Meat Loaf and was written and produced by Jim Steinman. It was released in September 1993, sixteen years after Meat Loaf’s first solo album Bat Out of Hell. The album reached number 1 in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia. Five tracks were released as singles, including “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That)”, which reached number 1 in 28 countries.

The album was released by Virgin Records outside of North America, where it was released by MCA. The third part of the Bat trilogy, Bat Out of Hell III: The Monster Is Loose, was released in 2006.

Like the first album of the trilogy, Bat Out of Hell II was a commercial success. It sold over 14 million copies worldwide.

  1. “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That)” 12:01
  2. “Life Is a Lemon and I Want My Money Back” 8:00
  3. “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through” 5:51
  4. “It Just Won’t Quit” 7:21
  5. “Out of the Frying Pan (And into the Fire)” 7:24
  6. “Objects in the Rear View Mirror May Appear Closer Than They Are” 10:16
  7. “Wasted Youth” (Monologue by Steinman) 2:41
  8. “Everything Louder than Everything Else” 8:00
  9. “Good Girls Go to Heaven (Bad Girls Go Everywhere)” 6:53
  10. “Back into Hell” (Instrumental) 2:46
  11. “Lost Boys and Golden Girls” 4:20

Jim Steinman – arranger
“Meat Loaf and the musicians” – co-arranger
Todd Rundgren – background vocal arranger
Mark Alexander – piano, backing vocals
Steve Buslowe – bass guitar, backing vocals
John Miceli – drums
Patti Russo – female lead vocals, backing vocals
Kasim Sulton – guitar, keyboards, backing vocals
Pat Thrall – lead guitar, backing vocals
Kenny Aronoff – drums
Roy Bittan – piano, keyboards
Jeff Bova – organ (8), synthesizer, programming
Jimmy Bralower – drums (9)
Steve Buslowe – bass guitar
Robert Coron – additional backing vocals (2)
Lorraine Crosby – female lead vocals (1, as “Mrs. Loud”), backing vocals (2, 6), additional backing vocals (8)
Brett Cullen – additional backing vocals (2)
Rory Dodd – additional vocals (6), backing vocals (1-5, 9, 11)
Stuart Emerson – backing vocals (2, 6)
Ellen Foley – additional vocals (6)
Cynthia Geary – additional backing vocals (2)
Amy Goff – backing vocals (2), additional backing vocals (9)
Elaine Goff – backing vocals (2), additional backing vocals (9)
Max Haskett – backing vocals (6, 8)
Curtis King – backing vocals (9)
Michelle Little – additional backing vocals (2)
Rick Marotta – drums (6, 8)
Eddie Martinez – guitar (1, 2, 6, 8, 9)
Brian Meagher – bagpipes (8), drums (8)
Brian Meagher, Jr. – bagpipes (8), drums (8)
Justin Meagher – bagpipes (8), drums (8)
Meat Loaf – lead vocals, backing vocals (2, 4)
Gunnar Nelson – backing vocals (2)
Matthew Nelson – backing vocals (2)
Bill Payne – piano (6, 8, 11)
Lenny Pickett – saxophone (3, 9)
Tim Pierce – guitar (1–5)
Todd Rundgren – backing vocals (1–6, 8, 9)
Jim Steinman – spoken word (7), additional backing vocals (2)
Kasim Sulton – backing vocals
Pat Thrall – guitar (4, 5)
Eric Troyer – backing vocals (11)

Wednesday 12am ET: Feature LP: Jim Steinman – Bad For Good (1981)

Bad for Good is a 1981 album by American songwriter Jim Steinman. Steinman wrote all of the songs and performed on most, although Rory Dodd contributed lead vocals on some tracks.

The songs were originally intended to be recorded by Meat Loaf as a follow up to Bat Out of Hell, titled Renegade Angel. However, Meat Loaf suffered vocal problems and was unable to sing. He would record several tracks from Bad for Good for his later albums.

The critical reaction to the album was mixed. Many reviews commented that Steinman’s singing voice was inadequate for the songs. Despite this, the album was a major commercial success, breaking the UK Top 10.

1. “Bad for Good” 8:45
2. “Lost Boys and Golden Girls” 4:36
3. “Love and Death and an American Guitar” 2:38
4. “Stark Raving Love” 7:23
5. “Out of the Frying Pan (And into the Fire)” 6:12
6. “Surf’s Up” 5:25
7. “Dance in My Pants” (duet with Karla DeVito) 7:58
8. “Left in the Dark” 7:58

1. “The Storm” 4:28
2. “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through” 6:29

Jim Steinman – lead vocals (except on “Lost Boys and Golden Girls”, “Surf’s Up”, “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through”), keyboards, spoken word
Rory Dodd – lead vocals on “Lost Boys and Golden Girls”, “Surf’s Up”, “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through”; backing vocals
Karla DeVito – lead vocals on “Dance in My Pants”
Todd Rundgren – guitars, backing vocals
Davey Johnstone – guitars on “Bad for Good”, “Stark Raving Love”, “Surf’s Up”, “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through”; mandolin on “Surf’s Up”
Kasim Sulton – bass on “Bad for Good,” “Out of the Frying Pan,” “Surf’s Up”; backing vocals
Steve Buslowe – bass on “Stark Raving Love,” “Dance in My Pants,” “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through”
Neil Jason – bass on “Left in the Dark”
Roy Bittan – piano (except on “Left in the Dark”)
Steven Margoshes – piano on “Left in the Dark”, conductor (New York Philharmonic) on “The Storm”, string arrangement on “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through”
Roger Powell – synthesizer on “Bad for Good”, “Stark Raving Love”, “Dance in My Pants”
Larry “Synergy” Fast – synthesizer on “Love and Death and an American Guitar”
Max Weinberg – drums (except on “Stark Raving Love,” “Dance in My Pants,” and “Left in the Dark”)
Allan Schwartzberg – drums on “Left in the Dark”
Joe Stefko – drums on “Stark Raving Love” and “Dance in My Pants”
Jimmy Maelen – percussion
Alan Rubin – trumpet on “Dance in My Pants” and “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through”
Tom Malone – horn arrangements and trombone on “Dance in My Pants” and “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through”
Lew Del Gatto – baritone sax on “Dance in My Pants” and “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through”
Lou Marini – tenor sax on “Dance in My Pants” and “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through”, solo on “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through”
Ellen Foley – backing vocals on “Bad for Good” and “Out of the Frying Pan”
Eric Troyer – backing vocals
Will Malone – string arrangement on “Out of the Frying Pan”
Charles Calello – conductor (New York Philharmonic) on “Left in the Dark”

In Memoriam: Jim Steinman (1947 – 2021)

James Richard Steinman (November 1, 1947 – April 19, 2021) was an American composer, lyricist, record producer, and playwright. He also worked as an arranger, pianist and singer. His work included songs in the adult contemporary, rock and roll, dance, pop, musical theater and film score genres. Beginning his career in musical theater, Steinman’s most notable work in the area included lyrics for Whistle Down the Wind and music for Tanz der Vampire.

His work included albums such as Meat Loaf’s Bat Out of Hell (which is one of the best selling albums of all time[3]) and Bat Out of Hell II: Back into Hell, and producing albums for Bonnie Tyler. His most successful chart singles include Tyler’s “Total Eclipse of the Heart”, Air Supply’s “Making Love Out of Nothing at All”, Meat Loaf’s “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That)”, the Sisters of Mercy’s “This Corrosion” and “More”, Barry Manilow’s “Read ‘Em and Weep”, Celine Dion’s cover of “It’s All Coming Back to Me Now” (originally released by Steinman’s project Pandora’s Box) and Boyzone’s “No Matter What” (the group’s first and only single to be popular and chart in the US). The album Bad for Good was released in his own name in 1981.

Jim Steinman is credited with book, music, and lyrics for Bat Out of Hell: The Musical, which, following a successful preview run in Manchester, had two runs on London’s West End, two runs in Toronto’s Ed Mirvish Theatre, a German-language production in Oberhausen, and a short run at the New York City Center.

Responding to an interviewer’s assertion that his songs are tragic, Steinman said he has “never been stomped on literally. Figuratively, I am stomped on every day … anyway, that is the way I feel sometimes. I’ve never had my heart broken the way you are talking about. I’ve never been dumped… but probably because I don’t allow myself to be dumped.”

At the time of his death, Steinman lived in Ridgefield, Connecticut.

Steinman had a stroke in 2004 and temporarily lost the ability to speak. He died from kidney failure at a hospital in Danbury, Connecticut, on April 19, 2021, at age 73.