Tag: Jethro Tull

Wednesday 2pm: Sounds of The 70’s

Today on Sounds of the 70’s, music from Warren Zevon, Allman Brothers Band, Betty Wright, Supremes, Jimmy Buffett, Abba, Jethro Tull, Jean Knight, Carol Douglas, Doobie Brothers, Elton John, Stampeders, Led Zeppelin and more . . .  

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

War Child is the seventh studio album by Jethro Tull, released in October 1974. It was released almost a year and a half after the release of A Passion Play. The turmoil over criticism of the previous album surrounded the production of War Child, which obliged the band to do press conferences and explain their plans for the future.

1. “War Child” 4:35
2. “Queen and Country” 3:00
3. “Ladies” 3:17
4. “Back-Door Angels” 5:30
5. “Sealion” 3:37
6. “Skating Away on the Thin Ice of the New Day” 4:09
7. “Bungle in the Jungle” 3:35
8. “Only Solitaire” 1:38
9. “The Third Hoorah” 4:49
10. “Two Fingers” 5:11

Aqualung is the fourth studio album by the rock band Jethro Tull, released in 1971. It is regarded, despite the band’s disagreement, as a concept album featuring a central theme of “the distinction between religion and God”. The album’s “dour musings on faith and religion” have marked it as “one of the most cerebral albums ever to reach millions of rock listeners”. Aqualung’s success signalled a turning point in the band’s career, which went on to become a major radio and touring act.

Recorded at Island Records’ studio in London, it was their first album with John Evan as a full-time member, their first with new bassist Jeffrey Hammond, and last album featuring Clive Bunker on drums. Something of a departure from the band’s previous work, the album features more acoustic material than previous releases; and—inspired by photographs of homeless people on the Thames Embankment taken by singer Ian Anderson’s wife Jennie—contains a number of recurring themes, addressing religion along with Anderson’s own personal experiences.

Aqualung has sold more than seven million units worldwide, and is thus Jethro Tull’s best-selling album. The album was generally well-received critically and has been included on several music magazine best-of lists. The album spawned two singles, “Hymn 43” and “Locomotive Breath”.

1. “Aqualung” 6:34
2. “Cross-Eyed Mary” 4:06
3. “Cheap Day Return” 1:21
4. “Mother Goose” 3:51
5. “Wond’ring Aloud” 1:53
6. “Up to Me” 3:15

1. “My God” 7:08
2. “Hymn 43” 3:14
3. “Slipstream” 1:13
4. “Locomotive Breath” 4:23
5. “Wind-Up” 6:01

Wednesday 9pm: Dominic Forbes Rock Talk with Martin Barre

Join Dominic Forbes with his interview of Martin Barre of Jethro Tull.  Music featured in this hour Thick As A Brick, Locomotive Breath, Aqualung, Cross Eyed Mary.  Immediately following join us for Jethro Tull our Feature Artist at 10pm.
 
Martin Lancelot Barre (born 17 November 1946) is an English rock musician best known for his work with progressive rock band Jethro Tull, with whom he recorded and toured from their second album in 1969 to the band’s initial dissolution in 2012. In the early 1990s he initiated a solo career that has now spawned four studio albums plus several guest appearances.

He has also played the flute and other instruments such as the mandolin, both on stage for Jethro Tull and in his own solo work.

On the first album that Barre recorded with Jethro Tull, Stand Up, he said that he was: “terrified because I had just joined the band. It really showed a change in direction for the band and when it was accepted and became a successful album, we gained a lot of confidence. We extended that confidence into the making of Benefit, in which we were a lot more at ease.” On the next album, the world success Aqualung, Martin was more confident, stating that in the recording: “Everybody [the band] had input into the making of the album.”

In the following period, his solos blended virtuosity with classical music, like on Minstrel in the Gallery, where the opening track has a four-minute solo, or his piece (shared with Barrie Barlow) “Conundrum” and “Quatrain” in Bursting Out. Martin declared that much of the material from Jethro Tull catalogue was written by himself and Ian Anderson, with Ian getting the credit for writing the lyrics and having the initial idea for the music, which: “then I, or someone else in the band, contribute parts to it.” There are two albums where he is credited for having put “additional material,” both classics Songs from the Wood and Heavy Horses, which Martin has already stated to be two of the albums which show his best playing. Curiously, his favourite album in Jethro Tull is the most controversial of the band’s career, Under Wraps, which contains two tracks co-authored by him. On his work with Jethro Tull, Martin also stated: “I’m quite pleased with my playing on Crest of a Knave, which was basically me, Ian and [bassist] Dave Pegg working in the studio for two months, so I had ample time to put a lot of myself into that album.” He is credited in only another two tracks of Jethro Tull albums: “Hot Mango Flush,” from J-Tull Dot Com and “Winter Snowscape” from The Jethro Tull Christmas Album. For his contribution to Jethro Tull music, Martin stated: “I’ve done bits and pieces on albums. Sometimes it’s a riff; sometimes it’s a little segment of music … I don’t mind taking a small role in the writing, and a larger input into the arrangement and playing.”

About the end of his involvement in Tull, Barre stated in 2015 that “It’s important that people realize there will never be a Jethro Tull again. There will be two solo bands: the Ian Anderson Band and the Martin Barre Band, and long may they exist, and long may they enjoy playing music. I’m not being pedantic. I always hate to hear, “Oh, you’ve left Jethro Tull.” I haven’t really. Ian wanted to finish Jethro Tull, wanted to stop the band completely.” – Wikipedia

Sunday with Ron Kovacs (8a – 12p) ET

SundayJoin Ron Kovacs for another edition of Sunday.  This week music from Fairport Convention, Jethro Tull, Steeleye Span, The Band, The Beach Boys, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Crosby, Stills & Nash, The Mamas & the Papas, Simon & Garfunkel, Ryan Adams, Joan Armatrading, Beck, Jackson Browne, Harry Chapin, Tracy Chapman, Jim Croce, Donovan, Bob Dylan, Dan Fogleberg, Steve Forbert, Ben Howard, Carole King, Mark Knopfler, Gordon Lightfoot, Van Morrison, Patrick Park, Ed Sheeran, Bruce Springsteen, Cat Stevens, Teddy Thompson, Eddie Vedder, Neil Young, Warren Zevon and more . .. .   Live starting 8am on RadioMaxMusic.

Rock Talk with Dominic Forbes 10pm ET

Martin BarreThis week Dominic Forbes chats with Martin Barre on Rock Talk:   

Martin Lancelot Barre (17 November 1946, Kings Heath, Birmingham, West Midlands, England) is an English rock musician.  Barre was the guitarist for rock band Jethro Tull, starting with the band’s second album in 1969. Barre once said that he tried not to listen to other guitarists so that he would not be influenced by them. He said he never took guitar lessons so that he would not sound like other players.  He has also played the flute, both on-stage for Jethro Tull and in his own solo work.