Tagged Jethro Tull

Saturday 12am ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – 50 For 50 (2018)

50 for 50 is a boxed set which spans fifty years of Jethro Tull, released in 2018. It includes some of the band’s biggest hits from 1968 to 2003.

“Nothing Is Easy”
“Love Story”
“Beggar’s Farm”
“Living in the Past”
“A Song for Jeffrey”
“A New Day Yesterday”
“The Witch’s Promise”
“Mother Goose”
“With You There to Help Me”
“Teacher” (U.S. version)
“Life’s a Long Song”
“Sweet Dream”
“Aqualung”
“Minstrel in the Gallery”
“Critique Oblique”
“Weathercock”
“Cross-Eyed Mary”
“Boureé”
“Dun Ringill”
“Heavy Horses”
“Hunting Girl”
“Bungle in the Jungle”
“Salamander”
“Pussy Willow”
“Too Old to Rock ‘n’ Roll: Too Young to Die”
“Songs from the Wood”
“The Whistler”
“Really Don’t Mind/See There a Son Is Born”
“Moths”
“One White Duck / 010 = Nothing At All”
“Cup of Wonder”
“Ring Out Solstice Bells”
“Skating Away (On the Thin Ice of the New Day)”
“A Christmas Song”
“One Brown Mouse”
“Rare and Precious Chain”
“Kissing Willie”
“Rocks on the Road”
“Fylingdale Flyer”
“Paparazzi”
“North Sea Oil”
“Steel Monkey”
“Black Sunday”
“European Legacy”
“Budapest”
“Broadsword”
“Dot Com”
“Farm on the Freeway”
“This Is Not Love”
“Locomotive Breath”

Tuesday 12am ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – Minstrel in the Gallery (1975)

Minstrel in the Gallery is the eighth studio album by British band Jethro Tull, recorded in April and released September 5, 1975. The album goes in a different direction from their previous work War Child (1974), with the orchestration being replaced by a string quartet conducted by David Palmer. The band also returned to the blend of electric and acoustic pieces, in a manner closer to their early ’70s albums such as Benefit (1970), Aqualung (1971) and Thick as a Brick (1972), and for the first time since their two concept albums of Thick as a Brick (1972) and A Passion Play (1973), they recorded a song of more than ten minutes, which occupies almost all of the second side of the record.

It would be the last album to feature bassist Jeffrey Hammond, who was replaced by former Carmen bass player John Glascock.

1. “Minstrel in the Gallery” 8:13
2. “Cold Wind to Valhalla” 4:19
3. “Black Satin Dancer” 6:52
4. “Requiem” 3:45

1. “One White Duck / 010 = Nothing at All” 4:37
2. “Baker St. Muse”
a) “Pig-Me and the Whore”
b) “Nice Little Tune”
c) “Crash-Barrier Waltzer”
d) “Mother England Reverie” 16:39
3. “Grace” 0:37
4. “Summerday Sands” 3:32
5. ” March The Mad Scientist” 1:44
6. “Pan Dance” 3:11

Wednesday 4pm: Sounds of The 70s

This week on the Sounds of The 70s, music from:  Frankie Valli, Wet Willie, John Miles, Elton John, Led Zeppelin, David Dundas, Wayne Newton, Electric Light Orchestra, Jethro Tull, KC & The Sunshine Band, Jackson 5 and many more . . . 

Thursday 6pm: Across The Tracks: Featuring – One (Part 3)

This installment of Across The Tracks feature tune with “ONE” in the title.  We’ll feature music from James Taylor, Laura Branigan, Queen, Ronnie Dyson, Deep Purple, Tommy Cash, Murray Head, Wallflowers, Jethro Tull and much more across the tracks and genres.  

Wednesday 10pm: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – Heavy Horses New Shoes Edition (2018)

Heavy Horses is the eleventh studio album by British progressive rock band Jethro Tull, released on 10 April 1978. It is considered the second album in a trilogy of folk-rock albums by Jethro Tull, although folk music’s influence is evident on a great number of Jethro Tull releases. The album abandons much of the folk lyrical content typical of the previous studio album, Songs from the Wood (1977), in exchange for a more realist perspective on the changing world – the album is dedicated to the “indigenous working ponies and horses of Great Britain”. Likewise, the band sound is harder and tighter. The third album in the folk-rock trilogy is Stormwatch (1979). An expanded, five-disk version was released on 2 March 2018.

On 2 March 2018 Jethro Tull released a five-disc ‘bookset’ version of Heavy Horses with a 96-page booklet that includes a track-by-track annotation of the album and its associated recordings by Ian Anderson. It is similar to the band’s other 40th Anniversary reissues, with the first disc containing another Steven Wilson stereo remix followed by ‘associated recordings’ including seven previously unreleased tracks. The second and third discs contain 22 previously unreleased live tracks, recorded at the Festhalle in Berne Switzerland during the European leg of their 1978 Heavy Horses Tour, from 28 May 1978, remixed to stereo by Jakko Jakszyk. The set also includes DVDs.

1. “…And The Mouse Police Never Sleeps”
2. “Acres Wild”
3. “No Lullaby”
4. “Moths”
5. “Journeyman”
6. “Rover”
7. “One Brown Mouse”
8. “Heavy Horses”
9. “Weathercock”
10. “Living In These Hard Times (version 2, previously unreleased)”
11. “Everything In Our Lives (previously unreleased)”
12. “Jack A Lynn (early version, previously unreleased)”
13. “Quatrain (studio version, previously unreleased)”
14. “Horse-Hoeing Husbandry (previously unreleased)”
15. “Beltane”
16. “Botanic Man (previously unreleased)”
17. “Living In These Hard Times (version 1)”
18. “Botanic Man Theme (previously unreleased)”

We are feature CD1 of the package.

Wednesday 2pm: Sounds of The 70’s

Today on Sounds of the 70’s, music from Warren Zevon, Allman Brothers Band, Betty Wright, Supremes, Jimmy Buffett, Abba, Jethro Tull, Jean Knight, Carol Douglas, Doobie Brothers, Elton John, Stampeders, Led Zeppelin and more . . .  

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

War Child is the seventh studio album by Jethro Tull, released in October 1974. It was released almost a year and a half after the release of A Passion Play. The turmoil over criticism of the previous album surrounded the production of War Child, which obliged the band to do press conferences and explain their plans for the future.

1. “War Child” 4:35
2. “Queen and Country” 3:00
3. “Ladies” 3:17
4. “Back-Door Angels” 5:30
5. “Sealion” 3:37
6. “Skating Away on the Thin Ice of the New Day” 4:09
7. “Bungle in the Jungle” 3:35
8. “Only Solitaire” 1:38
9. “The Third Hoorah” 4:49
10. “Two Fingers” 5:11

Aqualung is the fourth studio album by the rock band Jethro Tull, released in 1971. It is regarded, despite the band’s disagreement, as a concept album featuring a central theme of “the distinction between religion and God”. The album’s “dour musings on faith and religion” have marked it as “one of the most cerebral albums ever to reach millions of rock listeners”. Aqualung’s success signalled a turning point in the band’s career, which went on to become a major radio and touring act.

Recorded at Island Records’ studio in London, it was their first album with John Evan as a full-time member, their first with new bassist Jeffrey Hammond, and last album featuring Clive Bunker on drums. Something of a departure from the band’s previous work, the album features more acoustic material than previous releases; and—inspired by photographs of homeless people on the Thames Embankment taken by singer Ian Anderson’s wife Jennie—contains a number of recurring themes, addressing religion along with Anderson’s own personal experiences.

Aqualung has sold more than seven million units worldwide, and is thus Jethro Tull’s best-selling album. The album was generally well-received critically and has been included on several music magazine best-of lists. The album spawned two singles, “Hymn 43” and “Locomotive Breath”.

1. “Aqualung” 6:34
2. “Cross-Eyed Mary” 4:06
3. “Cheap Day Return” 1:21
4. “Mother Goose” 3:51
5. “Wond’ring Aloud” 1:53
6. “Up to Me” 3:15

1. “My God” 7:08
2. “Hymn 43” 3:14
3. “Slipstream” 1:13
4. “Locomotive Breath” 4:23
5. “Wind-Up” 6:01