Tag: Jethro Tull

Thursday 7/28/22 6pm ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – Living In The Past (1972)

Living in the Past is a double album quasi-compilation collection by Jethro Tull, which contains album tracks, out-takes, the “Life Is a Long Song” EP, and all of their non-LP singles except for “Sunshine Day”/”Aeroplane” (1968), “One for John Gee” (b-side of “A Song for Jeffrey”, 1968), “17” (b-side of “Sweet Dream”, 1969) and the original version of “Teacher” that appeared in the UK as the b-side of “The Witch’s Promise” in 1969 (the re-recorded 1970 take that was released on the American version of Benefit was included instead). Also included are two live recordings taken from a performance at New York City’s Carnegie Hall in November 1970.

  1. “A Song for Jeffrey” 3:20
  2. “Love Story” 3:02
  3. “Christmas Song” 3:05
  4. “Living in the Past” 3:20
  5. “Driving Song” 2:39
  6. “Sweet Dream” 4:02
  7. “Singing All Day” 3:03
  8. “Witch’s Promise” 3:49
  9. “Inside” 3:49
  10. “Just Trying to Be” 1:36
  11. “By Kind Permission Of” (live at the Carnegie Hall) 10:11
  12. “Dharma for One” (live at the Carnegie Hall) 9:45
  13. “Wond’ring Again” 4:12
  14. “Locomotive Breath” 4:24
  15. “Life Is a Long Song” 3:18
  16. “Up the ‘Pool” 3:10
  17. “Dr. Bogenbroom” 2:59
  18. “From Later” 2:06
  19. “Nursie” 1:38

Ian Anderson – vocals, flute, mandolin, tin whistle, electric guitar (12 string (on “Sweet Dream”), acoustic guitar (on “Just Trying to Be”, “Wond’ring Again”, “Life Is a Long Song”, “Up the ‘Pool” and “Dr. Bogenbroom”), balalaika; Hammond organ (on “Singing All Day”), violin
Mick Abrahams – electric guitar (on “A Song for Jeffrey” and “Love Story”)
Martin Barre – electric guitar, acoustic guitar (on “Witch’s Promise” and “Life Is a Long Song”), backing vocals and additional percussion (on “Dharma for One”)
John Evan – piano, Hammond organ, Mellotron, harpsichord, celeste, backing vocals and additional percussion (on “Dharma for One”)
Glenn Cornick – bass guitar; Hammond organ (on “Singing All Day”)
Jeffrey Hammond (as Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond) – bass guitar (on “Hymn 43”, “Locomotive Breath”, “Life Is a Long Song”, “Up the ‘Pool”, “Dr. Bogenbroom” and “From Later”)
Clive Bunker – drums, percussion, backing vocals (on “Dharma for One”)
Barriemore Barlow – drums (on “Life Is a Long Song”, “Up the ‘Pool”, “Dr. Bogenbroom” and “From Later”)
Dee Palmer – string and orchestra conductor arrangements (on “Christmas Song” and “Sweet Dream”)
Lou Toby – string arrangement and conductor (on “Living in the Past”)

Wednesday 7/13/22 1am ET: Live Track Show

Tonight:

Rod Stewart, Fleetwood Mac, Joe Cocker, CCR, Genesis, Pink Floyd, Alice Cooper, Dave Matthews Band, Rockpile, Jethro Tull, Chuck Berry, Neil Young, Who, America, Iron Maiden, Tori Amos, Supertramp, Three Dog Night, Daryl Hall and John Oates, Specials, Air Supply, Sheryl Crow, Melissa Etheridge, Wings, Queen, Cars, Firehouse,


Friday 7/15/22 1am ET: Live Track Show

Tonight:

Kenny Loggins, Supertramp, Dave Matthews Band, Elton John, Kelly Clarkson, Honeydrippers, Bon Jovi, Sha Na Na, Chuck Berry, Disturbed Featuring Myles Kennedy, UFO, Doors, Rolling Stones, Los Lonely boys with Ronnie Milsap, Bonnie Raitt, Metallica with the San Francisco Symphony, Van Morrison, Duran Duran, Fleetwood Mac, Peter Frampton, Grand Funk, Scorpions


Wednesday 7/13/22 1am ET: Live Track Show

Tonight:

Paul McCartney & Wings, Jethro Tull, Bon Jovi, Al Stewart, John Fogerty, Foreigner, Doobie Brothers, Eric Clapton, Elton John, Neil Young, Ozzy Osbourne, Queen, Rolling Stones, Mavis Staples, Journey, Robert Plant, Joe Cocker, Sly & The Family Stone, Nick Lowe, Nils Lofgren, Eagles, Def Leppard


Tuesday 7/5/22 10pm ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – Songs From The Wood (1977)

Songs from the Wood is the tenth studio album by British progressive rock band Jethro Tull, released February 1977. The album signaled a new direction for the band, who turned to celebrating British pagan folklore and the countryside life in a wide-ranging folk rock style which combined traditional instruments and melodies with hard rock drums and electric guitars.

The album is considered to be the first of a trio of folk rock albums: Songs from the Wood, Heavy Horses (1978) and Stormwatch (1979). An extended title line appears on the album cover: “Jethro Tull – with kitchen prose, gutter rhymes and divers – Songs from the Wood”. The title track contains two of these phrases in its lyrics.

The UK music-paper adverts read: “Jethro Tull present ‘Songs From The Wood’. A new album of Old Magic. Songs From The Wood. It’s inspired by the thought that perhaps nature isn’t as gentle as we’d like to believe. And it takes as its theme the natural and supernatural inhabitants of the woodlands of old England. Warm and friendly, harsh and bitter by turns, it includes ‘Ring Out Solstice Bells’ as well as Tull’s new single ‘The Whistler’ and seven other songs. Find a quiet spot and listen to it soon.”

1. “Songs From The Wood” 4:55
2. “Jack-In-The-Green” 2:31
3. “Cup Of Wonder” 4:34
4. “Hunting Girl” 5:10
5. “Ring Out, Solstice Bells” 3:48
6. “Velvet Green” 6:05
7. “The Whistler” 3:31
8. “Pibroch (Cap In Hand)” 8:35
9. “Fire At Midnight” 2:27
10. “Old Aces Die Hard (previously unreleased)” 8:41
11. “Working John, Working Joe (previously unreleased)” 5:11
12. “Magic Bells (Ring Out, Solstice Bells)” 3:25
13. “Songs From The Wood (unedited master)” 4:53
14. “Fire At Midnight (previously unreleased unedited master)” 2:35
15. “One Brown Mouse (early version)” 3:35
16. “Strip Cartoon” 3:19
17. “The Whistler (US Stereo Single Mix)” 3:32

Monday 3/7/22 12am ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – Thick As A Brick (1972)

Thick as a Brick is the fifth studio album by the British rock band Jethro Tull, released in March 1972. The album contains a continuous piece of music, split over two sides of an LP record, and is a parody of the concept album genre. The original packaging, designed like a newspaper, claims the album to be a musical adaptation of an epic poem by fictional eight-year-old genius Gerald Bostock, though the lyrics were actually written by the band’s frontman, Ian Anderson.

The album was recorded in late 1971, featuring music composed by Anderson and arranged with the contribution of all band members. The album was the first to include drummer Barriemore Barlow, replacing the band’s previous drummer Clive Bunker. The live show promoting the album included the playing of the full suite, with various comic interludes. Thick as a Brick is considered by critics to be the first Jethro Tull release to entirely consist of progressive rock music. It received mixed reviews upon its release, but was a commercial success and topped various charts in 1972. Today it is regarded as a classic of progressive rock, and has received several accolades. Anderson produced a follow-up to the album in 2012, focusing on the adult life of the fictional Gerald Bostock.

1. “Thick as a Brick, Part I” 22:40
2. “Thick as a Brick, Part II” 21:06

Ian Anderson – vocals, acoustic guitar, flute, violin, trumpet, saxophone
Martin Barre – electric guitar, lute
John Evan – piano, organ, harpsichord
Jeffrey Hammond (as “Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond”) – bass guitar, spoken word
Barriemore Barlow – drums, percussion, timpani
David Palmer – orchestral arrangements
Terry Ellis – executive producer
Robin Black – engineer

Sunday 1/30/22 11pm ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – The Zealot Gene (2022)

The Zealot Gene is the 22nd studio album by the British rock band Jethro Tull, released on January 28, 2022 by Inside Out Music. Nearly five years in production, it is their first studio album since The Jethro Tull Christmas Album (2003), and their first of all original material since J-Tull Dot Com (1999), marking the longest gap between the band’s studio albums.

  1. “Mrs. Tibbets” 5:53
  2. “Jacob’s Tales” 2:12
  3. “Mine Is the Mountain” 5:40
  4. “The Zealot Gene” 3:54
  5. “Shoshana Sleeping” 3:40
  6. “Sad City Sisters” 3:41
  7. “Barren Beth, Wild Desert John” 3:38
  8. “The Betrayal of Joshua Kynde” 4:05
  9. “Where Did Saturday Go?” 3:52
  10. “Three Loves, Three” 3:29
  11. “In Brief Visitation” 3:01
  12. “The Fisherman of Ephesus” 3:40

Ian Anderson – vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, mandolin, whistle, harmonica
Florian Opahle – electric guitar
David Goodier – bass guitar
John O’Hara – piano, keyboards, accordion, organ
Scott Hammond – drums

Monday 1/10/22 1pm ET: RadioMaxMusic Special: The Music of 1973 A to Z – Part 10

This RadioMax special features our Library of music from 1973 A2Z.

We continue with the completion of letter L and start with M and feature music from: Buckingham Nicks, Grass Roots, Brighter Side of Darkness, Jethro Tull, Abba, Paul Simon, Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn, O’Jays, Aerosmith, Four Tops, David Cassidy, Lobo, Robert Knight and many more.

1pm to 4pm ET

Sunday 12/26/21 9am ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – Aqualung (40th Anniversary)

Aqualung is the fourth studio album by the British rock band Jethro Tull, released on March 19, 1971, by Chrysalis Records. It is widely regarded as a concept album featuring a central theme of “the distinction between religion and God”, though the band have said there was no intention to make a concept album, and that only a few songs have a unifying theme. According to one reviewer, the album has “dour musings on faith and religion” which for him have marked it as “one of the most cerebral albums ever to reach millions of rock listeners”. Aqualung’s success signalled a turning point in the career of the band, which went on to become a major radio and touring act.

Recorded at Island Records’ studio in London, it was their first album with keyboardist John Evan as a full-time member, their first with new bassist Jeffrey Hammond, and last album featuring Clive Bunker on drums, who quit the band shortly after the release of the album. Something of a departure from the band’s previous work, the album features more acoustic material than previous releases; and—inspired by photographs of homeless people on the Thames Embankment taken by singer Ian Anderson’s wife Jennie—contains a number of recurring themes, addressing religion along with Anderson’s own personal experiences.

Aqualung is Jethro Tull’s best-selling album, selling more than seven million units worldwide. It was generally well-received critically and has been included on several music magazine best-of lists. The album spawned two singles, “Hymn 43” and “Locomotive Breath”.

2016 40th anniversary adapted edition

  1. “Aqualung” 6:38
  2. “Cross-Eyed Mary” 4:11
  3. “Cheap Day Return” 1:23
  4. “Mother Goose” 3:53
  5. “Wond’ring Aloud” 1:56
  6. “Up to Me” 3:17
  7. “My God” 7:13
  8. “Hymn 43” 3:19
  9. “Slipstream” 1:13
  10. “Locomotive Breath” 4:42
  11. “Wind-Up” 6:00
  12. “Lick Your Fingers Clean” 2:49
  13. “Just Trying to Be” 1:38
  14. “My God” (Early Version) 9:43
  15. “Wond’ring Aloud” (13 December 1970, the second known version of this song) 1:52
  16. “Wind-Up” (Early Version) 5:22
  17. “Slipstream” (Take 2) 0:55
  18. “Up the ‘Pool” (Early Version) 3:13
  19. “Wond’ring Aloud, Again” (June 21, 1970) 7:08
  20. “Life is a Long Song” 3:20
  21. “Up the ‘Pool” 3:13
  22. “Life is a Long Song” (Original EP Flat Transfer) 3:21
  23. “Up the ‘Pool” (Original EP Flat Transfer) 3:13
  24. “Dr. Bogenbroom” (Original EP Flat Transfer) 3:01
  25. “From Later” (Original EP Flat Transfer) 2:09
  26. “Nursie” (Original EP Flat Transfer) 1:38
  27. “Reprise Radio Advert” 0:53

Monday 11/15/21 2am ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – Too Old To Rock ‘n’ Roll: Too Young To Die (1976)

Too Old to Rock ‘n’ Roll: Too Young to Die! is the ninth studio album released by British band Jethro Tull, recorded in December 1975 and released in 1976. It is the first album to include bassist John Glascock who also contributes with backing vocals. Too Old to Rock ‘n’ Roll: Too Young to Die! is the last Jethro Tull concept album, which follows the story of Ray Lomas, an ageing rocker who finds fame with the changes of musical trends.

  1. “Quizz Kid” 5:09
  2. “Crazed Institution” 4:48
  3. “Salamander” 2:51
  4. “Taxi Grab” 3:54
  5. “From a Dead Beat to an Old Greaser” 4:09
  6. “Bad-Eyed and Loveless” 2:12
  7. “Big Dipper” 3:35
  8. “Too Old to Rock ‘n’ Roll: Too Young to Die” 5:44
  9. “Pied Piper” 4:32
  10. “The Chequered Flag (Dead or Alive)” 5:32
  11. “A Small Cigar” 3:39
  12. “Strip Cartoon” 3:19

Ian Anderson – lead vocals, acoustic guitar, flute, harmonica, additional electric guitar and percussion
Martin Barre – electric guitar
John Evan – piano, keyboards
John Glascock – backing vocals, bass guitar
Barriemore Barlow – drums, percussion
Dee Palmer – saxophone (on track 5), piano (on track 11)
Maddy Prior – backing vocals (on track 8)
Angela Allen – backing vocals (on tracks 2 & 7)

Monday 5/17/21 2pm ET: Sounds of The 70’s

This week we feature music from Jethro Tull, Thin Lizzy, Paper Lace, Cher, Bad Company, Rare Earth, CCR, Jim Croce, Eddie Floyd, Elton John, BTO, Miracles, Big Star, Diana Ross and more . . .

Tuesday 5/4/21 12am ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – Thick As A Brick (1972)

Thick as a Brick is the fifth studio album by the British rock band Jethro Tull, released in March 1972. The album contains a continuous piece of music, split over two sides of an LP record, and is a parody of the concept album genre. The original packaging, designed like a newspaper, claims the album to be a musical adaptation of an epic poem by fictional eight-year-old genius Gerald Bostock, though the lyrics were actually written by the band’s frontman, Ian Anderson.

The album was recorded in late 1971, featuring music composed by Anderson and arranged with the contribution of all band members. The album was the first to include drummer Barriemore Barlow, replacing the band’s previous drummer Clive Bunker. The live show promoting the album included the playing of the full suite, with various comic interludes. Thick as a Brick is considered by critics to be the first Jethro Tull release to entirely consist of progressive rock music. It received mixed reviews upon its release, but was a commercial success and topped various charts in 1972. Today it is regarded as a classic of progressive rock, and has received several accolades. Anderson produced a follow-up to the album in 2012, focusing on the adult life of the fictional Gerald Bostock.

1. “Thick as a Brick, Part I” 22:40
2. “Thick as a Brick, Part II” 21:06

Ian Anderson – vocals, acoustic guitar, flute, violin, trumpet, saxophone
Martin Barre – electric guitar, lute
John Evan – piano, organ, harpsichord
Jeffrey Hammond (as “Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond”) – bass guitar, spoken word
Barriemore Barlow – drums, percussion, timpani
David Palmer – orchestral arrangements
Terry Ellis – executive producer
Robin Black – engineer

Friday 12/4/2020 12:30am ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – Benefit (1970)

Benefit is the third studio album by the British rock band Jethro Tull, released in April 1970. It was the first Tull album to include pianist and organist John Evan – though he was not yet considered a permanent member of the group – and the last to include bass guitarist Glenn Cornick who was fired from the band upon completion of touring for the album. It was recorded at Morgan Studios, the same studio where the band recorded its previous album Stand Up however the band experimented with more advanced recording techniques.

Frontman Ian Anderson said that he considers Benefit to be a much darker album than Stand Up, owing to the pressures of an extensive U.S. tour and frustration with the music business.

1. “With You There to Help Me” 6:20
2. “Nothing to Say” 5:13
3. “Alive and Well and Living In” 2:48
4. “Son” 2:53
5. “For Michael Collins, Jeffrey and Me” 3:49
6. “To Cry You a Song” 6:16
7. “A Time for Everything?” 2:45
8. “Inside” 3:38
9. “Play in Time” 3:49
10. “Sossity; You’re a Woman” 4:37
11. “Singing All Day” 3:07
12. “Sweet Dream” 4:03
13. “17” 6:20
14. “Teacher (UK Single Version)” 4:58
15. “Teacher (US Album Version)” 4:03

Ian Anderson – vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar (uncredited), flute, balalaika, keyboards, production
Martin Barre – electric guitar
Glenn Cornick – bass guitar, Hammond organ (uncredited)
Clive Bunker – drums, percussion
Dee Palmer – orchestral arrangements
John Evan – piano, organ

Thursday 10/29/2020 12am ET: Feature LP: Jethro Tull – Crest of a Knave (1987)

Crest of a Knave is the sixteenth studio album by British rock band Jethro Tull, released in 1987. The album was recorded after a three year hiatus caused by a throat infection of vocalist Ian Anderson, resulting in a changed vocal style by Anderson. Following the unsuccessful electronic rock album Under Wraps, Crest of a Knave saw the band returning to a more hard rock sound. The album was their most successful since the 1970s, and the band enjoyed a resurgence on radio broadcasts, appearances in MTV specials, and the airing of music videos. It was also a critical favourite, winning the 1989 Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental in what was widely viewed as an upset over the favorite, Metallica’s …And Justice for All. The album was supported by “The Not Quite the World, More the Here and There Tour”.

1. “Steel Monkey” 3:39
2. “Farm on the Freeway” 6:31
3. “Jump Start” 4:55
4. “Said She Was a Dancer” 3:43
5. “Dogs in the Midwinter” 4:37
6. “Budapest” 10:05
7. “Mountain Men” 6:20
8. “The Waking Edge” 4:49
9. “Raising Steam” 4:05
10. “Part of the Machine” 6:54