Tag: Great Soul Performances

Friday 12pm ET: Feature Artist – Diana Ross

Diana Ross (born March 26, 1944) is an American singer, actress, and record producer. Born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, Ross rose to fame as the lead singer of the vocal group The Supremes, who during the 1960s became Motown’s most successful act, and are the best-charting female group in US history, as well as one of the world’s best-selling girl groups of all time. The group released a record-setting twelve number one hit singles on the US Billboard Hot 100, including “Where Did Our Love Go”, “Baby Love”, “Come See About Me”, “Stop! In the Name of Love”, “You Can’t Hurry Love”, “You Keep Me Hangin’ On”, “Love Child”, and “Someday We’ll Be Together”.

Following her departure from the Supremes in 1970, Ross released her eponymous debut solo album that same year, featuring the No. 1 Pop hit “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”. She later released the album Touch Me in the Morning in 1973; its title track was her second solo No. 1 hit. She continued a successful solo career through the 1970s, which included hit albums like Mahogany and Diana Ross and their No. 1 hit singles, “Theme from Mahogany” and “Love Hangover”, respectively. Her 1980 album Diana produced another No. 1 single, “Upside Down”, as well as the international hit “I’m Coming Out”. Her final single with Motown during her initial run with the company achieved her sixth and final US number one Pop hit, the duet “Endless Love” featuring Lionel Richie, whose solo career was launched with its success.

Ross has also ventured into acting, with a Golden Globe Award-winning and Academy Award–nominated performance in the film Lady Sings the Blues (1972); she recorded its soundtrack, which became a number one hit. She also starred in two other feature films, Mahogany (1975) and The Wiz (1978), later acting in the television films Out of Darkness (1994), for which she also was nominated for a Golden Globe Award, and Double Platinum (1999).

She is the only female artist to have number one singles as a solo artist; as the other half of a duet (Lionel Richie); as a member of a trio; and as an ensemble member (We are the World-USA for Africa). In 1976, Ross was named the “Female Entertainer of the Century” by Billboard magazine. In 1993, the Guinness Book of World Records declared her the most successful female music artist in history, due to her success in the United States and United Kingdom for having more hits than any female artist in the charts, with a career total of 70 hit singles with her work with the Supremes and as a solo artist. She had a top 10 UK hit in every one of the last five decades, and sang lead on a top 75 hit single at least once every year from 1964 to 1996 in the UK, a period of 33 consecutive years and a record for any performer.

In 1988, Ross was inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Supremes, alongside Mary Wilson and Florence Ballard. She was the recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors in 2007, the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2016. Ross is also one of the few recording artists to have two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame—one as a solo artist and the other as a member of the Supremes. In Billboard magazine’s Greatest of All Time Hot 100 Artists chart, she ranked 16th as the lead singer of the Supremes and 26th as a solo artist. Diana Ross ranks among the Top 5 artists of the rock era (1955 to date) on the Billboard Hot 100 when combining her solo and Supremes’ hits.

Tuesday 2pm ET: Feature Artist – Wilson Pickett

Wilson Pickett (March 18, 1941 – January 19, 2006) was an American singer and songwriter.

A major figure in the development of American soul music, Pickett recorded over 50 songs which made the US R&B charts, many of which crossed over to the Billboard Hot 100. Among his best-known hits are “In the Midnight Hour” (which he co-wrote), “Land of 1,000 Dances”, “Mustang Sally”, and “Funky Broadway”.

Pickett was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991, in recognition of his impact on songwriting and recording.

Monday 2pm ET: Feature Artist – The Platters

The Platters are an American vocal group formed in 1952. They are one of the most successful vocal groups of the early rock and roll era. Originally, their distinctive sound was a bridge between the pre-rock Tin Pan Alley tradition and the burgeoning new genre. The act has gone through several personnel changes, with one of the most successful incarnations comprising lead tenor Tony Williams, Paul Robi, Herb Reed, and Zola Taylor. The group had 40 charting singles on the Billboard Hot 100 chart between 1955 and 1967, including four number-one hits. The Platters are one of the first African-American groups to be accepted as a major chart group and are one of the most successful vocal groups in the world.

Wednesday 3pm ET: Feature Artist – Bobby Womack

Robert Dwayne Womack (March 4, 1944 – June 27, 2014) was an American singer, songwriter, musician, and record producer. Starting in the early 1960s as the lead singer of his family musical group the Valentinos and as Sam Cooke’s backing guitarist, Womack’s career spanned more than 60 years and multiple styles, including R&B, soul, rock and roll, doo-wop, and gospel.

Womack was a prolific songwriter who wrote and originally recorded, (with his brothers, the Valentinos), the Rolling Stones’ first UK number one hit, “It’s All Over Now” and New Birth’s “I Can Understand It”. As a singer, he is most notable for the hits “Lookin’ for a Love”, “That’s the Way I Feel About Cha”, “Woman’s Gotta Have It”, “Harry Hippie”, “Across 110th Street”, and his 1980s hits “If You Think You’re Lonely Now” and “I Wish He Didn’t Trust Me So Much”.

In 2009, Bobby Womack was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Womack died at his home in Tarzana, California at the age of 70 on June 27, 2014. He was cremated, and his ashes were interred at the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California, in The Great Mausoleum, Memorial Terrace, Memorial Terrace Columbarium.

Thursday 12am ET: Feature LP: Pointer Sisters – Goldmine (2010)

Goldmine: The Best Of The Pointer Sisters is a 32 track compilation released April 26. 2010

1-1 Fire 3:28
1-2 Everybody Is A Star 3:18
1-3 Angry Eyes 2:44
1-4 Happiness 4:01
1-5 Blind Faith 3:48
1-6 Who Do You Love 4:30
1-7 Dreaming As One 4:19
1-8 He’s So Shy 3:39
1-9 We’ve Got The Power 4:51
1-10 Could I Be Dreamin’ 3:30
1-11 Evil 3:19
1-12 Where Did The Time Go 3:07
1-13 Slow Hand 3:53
1-14 What A Surprise 3:48
1-15 Should I Do It 3:53
1-16 We’re Gonna Make It 3:54
2-1 American Music 4:02
2-2 I’m So Excited 5:41
2-3 If You Wanna Get Back Your Lady 4:12
2-4 I Need You 5:52
2-5 Automatic 4:48
2-6 Jump (For My Love) 6:27
2-7 Neutron Dance 4:09
2-8 Baby Come And Get It 4:13
2-9 Dare Me ( 6:20
2-10 Freedom 4:22
2-11 Hey You 3:58
2-12 Goldmine 6:30
2-13 All I Know Is The Way I Feel 4:42
2-14 My Life (Remix) 4:51
2-15 He Turned Me Out 4:13
2-16 I’m In Love 4:17

Saturday 7pm ET: Great Soul Performances with Bobby Jay

Bobby Jay during Legends Concert presented by Laguardia – January 10, 2007 in Belleville, New Jersey, United States.

When we get together later for “Great Soul Performances,” I’ll have on our musical menu: The Chi-Lites, O’Jays, Ohio Players, Ashford & Simpson, Turbans, Wilson Pickett, Laddins, Martha & the Vandellas, Joe Tex, Blue Magic, Temptations, War, Larry Chance & the Earls, Four Tops with Billy Eckstein; live in concert and more. It starts at 7PM ET, 6PM CT, 5PM MT and 4PM PT.

“Great Soul Performances 2:The 80s” follows, with music by: Gene Chandler, Whispers, Bar-Kays, Barry White, Patti LaBelle, Earl Swindell (Third World Earl), O’Jays, Shalamar, Diana Ross, Etta James, Freddie Mercury & Queen, Bobby Womack and many others. It kicks off at 9PM ET, 8PM CT, 7PM MT & 6PM PT.

Don’t forget the encore performances tomorrow, Sunday at 5PM eastern. So I hope to see you later this evening for “Great Soul Performances” and “Great Soul Performances 2: The 80s” on RadioMaxMusic.Com.

Monday 4pm ET: Feature Artist – Miracles

The Miracles (also known as Smokey Robinson and the Miracles from 1965 to 1972) were an American rhythm and blues vocal group that was the first successful recording act for Berry Gordy’s Motown Records, and one of the most important and influential groups in pop, rock and roll, and R&B music history. Formed in 1955 by Smokey Robinson, Warren “Pete” Moore, and Ronnie White, the group started off as the Five Chimes, changing their name to the Matadors two years later. The group then settled on the Miracles after the inclusion of Claudette Robinson in 1958. The most notable Miracles line-up included the Robinsons, Moore, White, Bobby Rogers and Marv Tarplin. After a failed audition with Brunswick Records, the group began working with songwriter Berry Gordy, who helped to produce their first records for the End and Chess labels before establishing Tamla Records in 1959 and signing the Miracles as its first act. The group eventually scored the label’s first million-selling hit record with the 1960 Grammy Hall of Fame smash, “Shop Around”, and further established themselves as one of Motown’s top acts with the hit singles “You’ve Really Got a Hold on Me”, “What’s So Good About Goodbye”, “Way Over There”, “I’ll Try Something New”, “Mickey’s Monkey”, “Going to a Go-Go”, “(Come ‘Round Here) I’m the One You Need”, “Just A Mirage”, “If You Can Want”, “More Love”, “I Don’t Blame You at All”, “Ooo Baby Baby”, the multi-award-winning “The Tracks of My Tears”,”My Girl Has Gone’ “Special Occasion”, “I Second That Emotion”, “Baby Baby Don’t Cry”, the number-one Pop smashes “The Tears of a Clown” and “Love Machine”, “Do It Baby”, and “That’s What Love Is Made Of”, among numerous other hits.

Referred to as Motown’s “soul supergroup”, the Miracles recorded 26 Top 40 Pop hits, sixteen of which reached the Billboard Top 20, seven top 10 singles, and a number one single (“The Tears of a Clown”) while the Robinsons and Tarplin were members. Following the departure of Tarplin and the Robinsons, the rest of the group continued with singer Billy Griffin and managed by Martin Pichinson who helped rebuild the Miracles, they scored two final top 20 singles, “Do It Baby” and “Love Machine”, a second No. 1 hit, which topped the charts before the group departed for Columbia Records in 1977, recording as a quintet with Billy’s brother Donald Griffin replacing Marv Tarplin, where after a few releases, they disbanded in 1978. In all, the group had over fifty charted hits by the time they disbanded. On the R&B charts, the Miracles scored 26 Top 10 Billboard R&B hits, with 4 R&B No. 1’s, and 11 U.S. R&B Top 10 Albums, including 2-No.1’s. Bobby Rogers and Ronald White revived the group as a touring ensemble sporadically during the 1980s and again in the 1990s with lead singer Sydney Justin. Following White’s death in 1995, Rogers continued to tour with different members until he was forced into retirement due to health issues in 2011, dying less than two years later.

The Miracles have been awarded many top music industry honors over the years. In 1997, the group received the Pioneer Award at the Rhythm and Blues Foundation for their musical achievements. Four years later, in 2001, they were inducted to the Vocal Group Hall of Fame. In 2004, they were ranked No. 32 on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, retaining that same position seven years later, in 2011. Four of their hit songs were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame (The most of any Motown group). In 2009, the group received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Throughout their careers, the Miracles were also enshrined with honors for their songwriting by both BMI and ASCAP. In 2008, Billboard listed them at No. 61 on their 100 most successful Billboard artists ever list. After much controversy, the Miracles were inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012.