Tag: George Harrison

Wednesday 12/1/21 2am ET: Feature LP: George Harrison – Concert For Bangladesh (1971)

The Concert for Bangladesh is a live triple album credited to “George Harrison & Friends” and released on Apple Records in December 1971 in America and January 1972 in Britain. The album followed the two concerts of the same name, held on 1 August 1971 at New York’s Madison Square Garden, featuring Harrison, Bob Dylan, Ravi Shankar, Ali Akbar Khan, Ringo Starr, Billy Preston, Leon Russell and Eric Clapton. The shows were a pioneering charity event, in aid of the homeless Bengali refugees of the Bangladesh Liberation War, and set the model for future multi-artist rock benefits such as Live Aid (1985) and the Concert for New York City (2001). The event brought Harrison and Starr together on a concert stage for the first time since 1966, when the Beatles retired from live performance, and represented Dylan’s first major concert appearance in the US in five years.

Co-produced by Phil Spector, The Concert for Bangladesh features his Wall of Sound approach in a live setting. Besides the main performers, the musicians and singers include Badfinger, Jim Horn, Klaus Voormann, Alla Rakha, Jim Keltner, Jesse Ed Davis and Claudia Lennear. Minimal post-production was carried out on the recordings, ensuring that the album was a faithful document of the event. The box set’s packaging included a 64-page book containing photos from the concerts; the album cover, designed by Tom Wilkes, consisted of an image of a malnourished child sitting beside an empty food bowl. The album was delayed for three months due to protracted negotiations between Harrison and two record companies keen to protect their business interests, Capitol and Columbia/CBS.

On release, The Concert for Bangladesh was a major critical and commercial success. It topped albums charts in several countries and went on to win the Grammy Award for Album of the Year in March 1973. Together with the 1972 Apple concert film directed by Saul Swimmer, the album gained Indian classical music its largest Western audience up until that time. It was reissued in 2005, four years after Harrison’s death, with revised artwork. As of 2011, sales of the album continue to benefit the George Harrison Fund for UNICEF, which raised $1.2 million for children in the Horn of Africa, in a campaign marking the album’s 40th anniversary.

  1. “George Harrison/Ravi Shankar Introduction” 5:19
  2. “Bangla Dhun” 16:40
  3. “Wah-Wah” 3:30
  4. “My Sweet Lord” 4:36
  5. “Awaiting on You All” 3:00
  6. “That’s the Way God Planned It” 4:20
  7. “It Don’t Come Easy” 3:01
  8. “Beware of Darkness” 3:36
  9. “Band Introduction” 2:39
  10. “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” 4:53
  11. “Medley: Jumpin’ Jack Flash/Youngblood” 9:27
  12. “Here Comes the Sun” 2:59
  13. “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” 5:44
  14. “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry” 3:07
  15. “Blowin’ in the Wind” 4:07
  16. “Mr. Tambourine Man” 4:45
  17. “Just Like a Woman” 4:49
  18. “Something” 3:42
  19. “Bangla Desh” 4:55

Thursday 11/25/21 4am ET: Feature LP: George Harrison – The Best of Dark Horse (1976-1989) (1989)

Best of Dark Horse 1976–1989 is a compilation album by English musician George Harrison, released in October 1989. His second compilation, after the Capitol/EMI collection The Best of George Harrison (1976), it contains songs from Harrison’s releases on his Dark Horse record label between 1976 and 1987. The album also includes a 1989 single, “Cheer Down”, which was Harrison’s contribution to the soundtrack of the film Lethal Weapon 2, and two tracks recorded specifically for the collection: “Poor Little Girl” and “Cockamamie Business”. Despite the popularity of Harrison’s work over this period – both as a solo artist with his Cloud Nine album (1987), and as a member of the Traveling Wilburys – the compilation failed to achieve commercial success.

Best of Dark Horse became out of print in the early 1990s, and it remained unavailable when Harrison’s Dark Horse catalogue was reissued in 2004. It remains the only official release to include “Poor Little Girl” and “Cockamamie Business”.

  1. “Poor Little Girl” 4:33
  2. “Blow Away” 3:59
  3. “That’s the Way It Goes” 3:34
  4. “Cockamamie Business” 5:15
  5. “Wake Up My Love” 3:32
  6. “Life Itself” 4:24
  7. “Got My Mind Set on You” 3:52
  8. “Crackerbox Palace” 3:56
  9. “Cloud 9” 3:14
  10. “Here Comes the Moon” 4:09
  11. “Gone Troppo” 4:23
  12. “When We Was Fab” 3:56
  13. “Love Comes to Everyone” 3:40
  14. “All Those Years Ago” 3:44
  15. “Cheer Down” 4:08

Musicians on new recordings (“Poor Little Girl” and “Cockamamie Business”)

George Harrison – vocals, guitars, banjo, backing vocals
Jeff Lynne – bass, keyboards, backing vocals
Richard Tandy – piano
Ray Cooper – percussion
Ian Paice – drums
Jim Horn – saxophones, horn arrangements

Monday 8/16/21 10pm ET: Feature LP: George Harrison – All Things Must Pass (1970 / 2021) 50th Anniversary Edition

All Things Must Pass is the third studio album by English rock musician George Harrison. Released as a triple album in November 1970, it was Harrison’s first solo work after the break-up of the Beatles in April that year. It includes the hit singles “My Sweet Lord” and “What Is Life”, as well as songs such as “Isn’t It a Pity” and the title track that had been overlooked for inclusion on releases by the Beatles. The album reflects the influence of Harrison’s musical activities with artists such as Bob Dylan, the Band, Delaney & Bonnie and Friends and Billy Preston during 1968–70, and his growth as an artist beyond his supporting role to former bandmates John Lennon and Paul McCartney. All Things Must Pass introduced Harrison’s signature slide guitar sound and the spiritual themes present throughout his subsequent solo work. The original vinyl release consisted of two LPs of songs and a third disc of informal jams titled Apple Jam. Several commentators interpret Barry Feinstein’s album cover photo, showing Harrison surrounded by four garden gnomes, as a statement on his independence from the Beatles.

During the final year of his life, Harrison oversaw a successful reissue campaign to mark the 30th anniversary of the album’s release. After this reissue, the Recording Industry Association of America certified the album six-times platinum. Among its appearances on critics’ best-album lists, All Things Must Pass was ranked 79th on The Times’ “The 100 Best Albums of All Time” in 1993, while Rolling Stone placed it 368th on the magazine’s 2020 update of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time”. In 2014, All Things Must Pass was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

On November 27, 2020, the Harrison family released a stereo remix of the song “All Things Must Pass” to mark the album’s 50th anniversary. Dhani Harrison described it as a prelude to further releases related to the anniversary. That same month, as part of its Archive on 4 series, BBC Radio 4 broadcast “All Things Must Pass at 50”, a one-hour special presented by Nitin Sawhney.

On June 10, 2021, the release of a 50th anniversary edition was officially announced for August 6. The reissue is available in seven varieties, from Standard vinyl and CD editions up to an Uber Deluxe Edition box set. The most extensive editions contain 70 tracks across 5 CDs/8LPs, including outtakes, jams and 47 demos, 42 of which are previously unreleased, and a scrapbook containing archival notes and track-by-track annotation curated by Olivia Harrison. The Uber Deluxe set adds a 44-page book on the creation of the 1970 triple album, along with scale replica figurines of Harrison and the Friar Park gnomes, an illustration by Voormann, and Paramahansa Yogananda’s text “Light from the Great Ones”, among other extras.

CD1
“I’d Have You Anytime” – 2:56

“My Sweet Lord” – 4:38
“Wah-Wah” – 5:35
“Isn’t It a Pity (Version One)” – 7:10
“What Is Life” – 4:22
“If Not for You” – 3:29
“Behind That Locked Door” – 3:05
“Let It Down” – 4:57
“Run of the Mill” – 2
:49

CD2
“Beware of Darkness” – 3:48
“Apple Scruffs” – 3:04
“Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)” – 3:48
“Awaiting on You All” – 2:45
“All Things Must Pass” – 3:44
“I Dig Love” – 4:55
“Art of Dying” – 3:37
“Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)” – 4:45
“Hear Me Lord” – 5:46
“Out of the Blue” – 11:14
“It’s Johnny’s Birthday” (Bill Martin, Phil Coulter, Harrison) – 0:49
“Plug Me In” – 3:18
“I Remember Jeep” – 8:07
“Thanks for the Pepperoni” – 5:31

CD3
“All Things Must Pass” (Day 1 Demo) – 4:38
“Behind That Locked Door” (Day 1 Demo) – 2:54
“I Live for You” (Day 1 Demo) – 3:26
“Apple Scruffs” (Day 1 Demo) – 2:48
“What Is Life” (Day 1 Demo) – 4:46
“Awaiting on You All” (Day 1 Demo) – 2:30
“Isn’t It a Pity” (Day 1 Demo) – 3:19
“I’d Have You Anytime” (Day 1 Demo) – 2:10

“I Dig Love” (Day 1 Demo) – 3:35
“Going Down to Golders Green” (Day 1 Demo) – 2:24
“Dehra Dun” (Day 1 Demo) – 3:39
“Om Hare Om (Gopala Krishna)” (Day 1 Demo) – 5:13
“Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)” (Day 1 Demo) – 3:41
“My Sweet Lord” (Day 1 Demo) – 3:21
“Sour Milk Sea” (Day 1 Demo) – 2:28

CD4
“Run of the Mill” (Day 2 Demo) – 1:54
“Art of Dying” (Day 2 Demo) – 3:04

“Everybody-Nobody” (Day 2 Demo) – 2:20
“Wah-Wah” (Day 2 Demo) – 4:24
“Window Window” (Day 2 Demo) – 1:53
“Beautiful Girl” (Day 2 Demo) – 2:39
“Beware of Darkness” (Day 2 Demo) – 3:20
“Let It Down” (Day 2 Demo) – 3:57
“Tell Me What Has Happened to You” (Day 2 Demo) – 2:57
“Hear Me Lord” (Day 2 Demo) – 4:57
“Nowhere to Go” (Day 2 Demo) – 2:44
“Cosmic Empire” (Day 2 Demo) – 2:12
“Mother Divine” (Day 2 Demo) – 2:45
“I Don’t Want to Do It” (Day 2 Demo) – 2:05
“If Not for You” (Day 2 Demo) – 1:48

CD5
“Isn’t It a Pity” (take 14) – 0:53
“Wah-Wah” (take 1) – 5:56
“I’d Have You Anytime” (take 5) – 2:48
“Art of Dying” (take 1) – 2:48
“Isn’t It a Pity” (take 27) – 4:01
“If Not For You” (take 2) (Dylan) – 2:59
“Wedding Bells (Are Breaking Up That Old Gang of Mine)” (take 1) – 1:56
“What Is Life” (take 1) – 4:34
“Beware of Darkness” (take 8) – 3:48
“Hear Me Lord” (take 5) – 9:31
“Let It Down” (take 1) – 4:13
“Run of the Mill” (take 36) – 2:28
“Down to the River (Rocking Chair Jam)” (take 1) – 2:30
“Get Back” (take 1) – 2:07
“Almost 12 Bar Honky Tonk” (take 1) – 8:34
“It’s Johnny’s Birthday” (take 1) – 0:59
“Woman Don’t You Cry for Me” (take 5) – 5:01

George Harrison – vocals, electric and acoustic guitars, dobro, harmonica, Moog synthesizer, harmonium, backing vocals; bass guitar (2001 reissue only)
Eric Clapton – electric and acoustic guitars, backing vocals
Gary Wright – piano, organ, electric piano
Bobby Whitlock – organ, harmonium, piano, tubular bells,[361] backing vocals
Klaus Voormann – bass guitar, electric guitar[nb 33]
Jim Gordon – drums
Carl Radle – bass guitar
Ringo Starr – drums, percussion
Billy Preston – organ, piano
Jim Price – trumpet, trombone
Bobby Keys – saxophones
Alan White – drums, vibraphone
Pete Drake – pedal steel
John Barham – orchestral arrangements, choral arrangement,[363] harmonium, vibraphone
Pete Ham – acoustic guitar
Tom Evans – acoustic guitar
Joey Molland – acoustic guitar
Mike Gibbins – percussion
Peter Frampton – acoustic guitar[133]
Dave Mason – electric and acoustic guitars
Tony Ashton – piano
Gary Brooker – piano
Mal Evans – percussion, vocal on “It’s Johnny’s Birthday”, “tea and sympathy”
Ginger Baker – drums on “I Remember Jeep”
John Lennon – handclaps on “I Remember Jeep”
Yoko Ono – handclaps on “I Remember Jeep”
Al Aronowitz – unspecified contribution on “Out of the Blue”
Eddie Klein – vocal on “It’s Johnny’s Birthday”
Dhani Harrison – acoustic guitar, electric piano, backing vocals (2001 reissue only)
Sam Brown – vocals, backing vocals (2001 reissue only)
Ray Cooper – percussion, synthesizer (2001 reissue only)

Friday 11/27/2020 7am ET: Feature LP: George Harrison – Concert For Bangladesh (1971)

The Concert for Bangladesh is a live triple album credited to “George Harrison & Friends” and released on Apple Records in December 1971 in America and January 1972 in Britain. The album followed the two concerts of the same name, held on 1 August 1971 at New York’s Madison Square Garden, featuring Harrison, Bob Dylan, Ravi Shankar, Ali Akbar Khan, Ringo Starr, Billy Preston, Leon Russell and Eric Clapton. The shows were a pioneering charity event, in aid of the homeless Bengali refugees of the Bangladesh Liberation War, and set the model for future multi-artist rock benefits such as Live Aid (1985) and the Concert for New York City (2001). The event brought Harrison and Starr together on a concert stage for the first time since 1966, when the Beatles retired from live performance, and represented Dylan’s first major concert appearance in the US in five years.

Co-produced by Phil Spector, The Concert for Bangladesh features his Wall of Sound approach in a live setting. Besides the main performers, the musicians and singers include Badfinger, Jim Horn, Klaus Voormann, Alla Rakha, Jim Keltner, Jesse Ed Davis and Claudia Lennear. Minimal post-production was carried out on the recordings, ensuring that the album was a faithful document of the event. The box set’s packaging included a 64-page book containing photos from the concerts; the album cover, designed by Tom Wilkes, consisted of an image of a malnourished child sitting beside an empty food bowl. The album was delayed for three months due to protracted negotiations between Harrison and two record companies keen to protect their business interests, Capitol and Columbia/CBS.

On release, The Concert for Bangladesh was a major critical and commercial success. It topped albums charts in several countries and went on to win the Grammy Award for Album of the Year in March 1973. Together with the 1972 Apple concert film directed by Saul Swimmer, the album gained Indian classical music its largest Western audience up until that time. It was reissued in 2005, four years after Harrison’s death, with revised artwork. As of 2011, sales of the album continue to benefit the George Harrison Fund for UNICEF, which raised $1.2 million for children in the Horn of Africa, in a campaign marking the album’s 40th anniversary.

1. “George Harrison/Ravi Shankar Introduction” 5:19
2. “Bangla Dhun” 16:40

1. “Wah-Wah” 3:30
2. “My Sweet Lord” 4:36
3. “Awaiting on You All” 3:00
4. “That’s the Way God Planned It” 4:20

1. “It Don’t Come Easy” 3:01
2. “Beware of Darkness” 3:36
3. “Band Introduction” 2:39
4. “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” 4:53

1. “Medley: Jumpin’ Jack Flash/Youngblood” 9:27
2. “Here Comes the Sun” 2:59

1. “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” 5:44
2. “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry” 3:07
3. “Blowin’ in the Wind” 4:07
4. “Mr. Tambourine Man” 4:45
5. “Just Like a Woman” 4:49

1. “Something” 3:42
2. “Bangla Desh” 4:55

 

Thursday 6/18/2020 12am ET: Feature LP: George Harrison – Cloud 9 (1987)

Cloud Nine is the eleventh studio album by English musician George Harrison. The album was recorded and released in 1987 after Harrison had taken a five-year hiatus from his career as a solo artist. The hit single “Got My Mind Set on You” from this album re-established Harrison as a critically acclaimed and commercially significant recording artist. Cloud Nine was Harrison’s last solo studio album released during his lifetime, as his next album Brainwashed was released in 2002, almost a year after his death.

1. “Cloud 9” 3:15
2. “That’s What It Takes” 3:59
3. “Fish on the Sand” 3:22
4. “Just for Today” 4:06
5. “This Is Love” 3:48
6. “When We Was Fab” 3:57
7. “Devil’s Radio” 3:52
8. “Someplace Else” 3:51
9. “Wreck of the Hesperus” 3:31
10. “Breath Away from Heaven” 3:36
11. “Got My Mind Set on You” 3:52
12. “Shanghai Surprise” 5:09
13. “Zig Zag” 2:45

Tuesday 2pm ET: Feature Artist: George Harrison

George Harrison MBE (February 25, 1943 – November 29, 2001) was an English musician, singer-songwriter, music and film producer who achieved international fame as the lead guitarist of the Beatles. Often referred to as “the quiet Beatle”, Harrison embraced Indian culture and helped broaden the scope of popular music through his incorporation of Indian instrumentation and Hindu-aligned spirituality in the Beatles’ work. Although the majority of the band’s songs were written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, most Beatles albums from 1965 onwards contained at least two Harrison compositions. His songs for the group included “Taxman”, “Within You Without You”, “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”, “Here Comes the Sun” and “Something”.

Harrison’s earliest musical influences included George Formby and Django Reinhardt; Carl Perkins, Chet Atkins and Chuck Berry were subsequent influences. By 1965, he had begun to lead the Beatles into folk rock through his interest in Bob Dylan and the Byrds, and towards Indian classical music through his use of the sitar on “Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)”. Having initiated the band’s embracing of Transcendental Meditation in 1967, he subsequently developed an association with the Hare Krishna movement. After the band’s break-up in 1970, Harrison released the triple album All Things Must Pass, a critically acclaimed work that produced his most successful hit single, “My Sweet Lord”, and introduced his signature sound as a solo artist, the slide guitar. He also organised the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh with Indian musician Ravi Shankar, a precursor to later benefit concerts such as Live Aid. In his role as a music and film producer, Harrison produced acts signed to the Beatles’ Apple record label before founding Dark Horse Records in 1974 and co-founding HandMade Films in 1978.

Harrison released several best-selling singles and albums as a solo performer. In 1988, he co-founded the platinum-selling supergroup the Traveling Wilburys. A prolific recording artist, he was featured as a guest guitarist on tracks by Badfinger, Ronnie Wood and Billy Preston, and collaborated on songs and music with Dylan, Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr and Tom Petty, among others. Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 11 in their list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”. He is a two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee – as a member of the Beatles in 1988, and posthumously for his solo career in 2004.

Harrison’s first marriage, to model Pattie Boyd in 1966, ended in divorce in 1977. The following year he married Olivia Arias, with whom he had a son, Dhani. Harrison died from lung cancer in 2001 at the age of 58, two years after surviving a knife attack by an intruder at his Friar Park home. His remains were cremated and the ashes were scattered according to Hindu tradition in a private ceremony in the Ganges and Yamuna rivers in India. He left an estate of almost £100 million.

Wednesday 6pm ET: Sounds of The 70s

This week on the sounds of the seventies we feature music from:  Gordon Lightfoot, Abba, Jackson Browne, Elton John, Tin Tin, Bay City Rollers, Stampeders, Bill Withers, George Harrison, Doobie Brothers and more . . .

Wednesday 6pm ET: Sounds of The 70s

This week we feature music from George Harrison, Paul McCartney, Doobie Brothers, Steely Dan, Poco, Temptations, Carpenters, Billy Preston, Charlie Daniels Band and more . . .

Tuesday 4pm ET: Sounds of The 80s

This week on the Sounds of The 80s we feature music from:  Tom Petty, Steely Dan, Toto, Huey Lewis and The News, Steve Perry, Styx, Billy Idol, Stars On 45, Traveling Wilburys, Michael Jackson, George Harrison and many more . . .

Thursday 6pm: Artist Countdown: George Harrison Top 30 Hits

George Harrison MBE (February 25, 1943 – November 29, 2001) was an English musician, singer-songwriter, music and film producer who achieved international fame as the lead guitarist of the Beatles. Often referred to as “the quiet Beatle”, Harrison embraced Indian culture and helped broaden the scope of popular music through his incorporation of Indian instrumentation and Hindu-aligned spirituality in the Beatles’ work. Although the majority of the band’s songs were written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, most Beatles albums from 1965 onwards contained at least two Harrison compositions. His songs for the group included “Taxman”, “Within You Without You”, “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”, “Here Comes the Sun” and “Something”.

Harrison’s earliest musical influences included George Formby and Django Reinhardt; Carl Perkins, Chet Atkins and Chuck Berry were subsequent influences. By 1965, he had begun to lead the Beatles into folk rock through his interest in Bob Dylan and the Byrds, and towards Indian classical music through his use of the sitar on “Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)”. Having initiated the band’s embracing of Transcendental Meditation in 1967, he subsequently developed an association with the Hare Krishna movement. After the band’s break-up in 1970, Harrison released the triple album All Things Must Pass, a critically acclaimed work that produced his most successful hit single, “My Sweet Lord”, and introduced his signature sound as a solo artist, the slide guitar. He also organised the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh with Indian musician Ravi Shankar, a precursor for later benefit concerts such as Live Aid. In his role as a music and film producer, Harrison produced acts signed to the Beatles’ Apple record label before founding Dark Horse Records in 1974 and co-founding HandMade Films in 1978.

Harrison released several best-selling singles and albums as a solo performer. In 1988, he co-founded the platinum-selling supergroup the Traveling Wilburys. A prolific recording artist, he was featured as a guest guitarist on tracks by Badfinger, Ronnie Wood and Billy Preston, and collaborated on songs and music with Dylan, Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr and Tom Petty, among others. Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 11 in their list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”. He is a two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee – as a member of the Beatles in 1988, and posthumously for his solo career in 2004.

Harrison’s first marriage, to model Pattie Boyd in 1966, ended in divorce in 1977. The following year he married Olivia Arias, with whom he had a son, Dhani. Harrison died from lung cancer in 2001 at the age of 58, two years after surviving a knife attack by an intruder at his Friar Park home. His remains were cremated and the ashes were scattered according to Hindu tradition in a private ceremony in the Ganges and Yamuna rivers in India. He left an estate of almost £100 million. – Wikipedia

 

 

1 “My Sweet Lord”
2 “Got My Mind Set on You”
3 “All Those Years Ago”
4 “Bangla Desh”
5 “Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)”
6 “What Is Life”
7 “When We Was Fab”
8 “You”
9 “Ding Dong, Ding Dong”
10 “Blow Away”
11 “Crackerbox Palace”
12 “This Song”
13 “Dark Horse”
14 “This Is Love”
15 “Devil’s Radio”
16 “Cheer Down”
17 “Isn’t It a Pity”
18 “Cloud 9”
19 “Stuck Inside a Cloud”
20 “Teardrops”
21 “Any Road”
22 “Love Comes to Everyone”
23 “Wake Up My Love”
24 “Deep Blue”
25 “This Guitar (Can’t Keep from Crying)”
26 “True Love”
27 “It’s What You Value”
28 “Dream Away”
29 “Shanghai Surprise” (with Vicki Brown)
30 “That’s What It Takes”

Wednesday 10pm: Feature LP: George Harrison – Brainwashed (2002)

Brainwashed is the twelfth and final studio album by George Harrison, released in 2002, almost a year after his death at age 58. Recordings began over a decade before Harrison’s death but were repeatedly delayed. The album was completed by Harrison’s son Dhani and longtime friend and collaborator Jeff Lynne. It reached the top 30 in the UK and top 20 in the US, and had reasonably favorable reviews.

Click here for album contents from Wikipedia

Feature Year: 1974 – 9am ET

1974January 3 – Bob Dylan and The Band kick off their 40-date concert tour at Chicago Stadium. It’s Dylan’s first time on the road since 1966.
January 17 – Joni Mitchell releases her monumental album Court and Spark, supported by the single “Help Me” reaching the highest moment of commercial success. Dino Martin, singer and son of Dean Martin, is arrested on suspicion of possession and sale of two machine guns.
February 10 – record producer Phil Spector is badly injured in a car accident. Details of the accident are kept secret.
February 12 – New York’s rock club, Bottom Line, opens in Greenwich Village. The first headlining act is Dr. John.
February 14 – The Captain & Tennille are married in Virginia City, Nevada.
February 16 – Two years of litigation between Grand Funk and former manager Terry Knight are finally resolved. The band gets the rights to its name but Knight wins a cash settlement.
February 18 – Yes sells out the first of two nights at Madison Square Garden, without a bit of advertising for the show. Kiss releases their self-titled debut album.
February 19 – The first American Music Awards are broadcast on ABC, two weeks before the Grammys.
February 20 – Cher files for divorce from her husband of 10 years, Sonny Bono.
March 12 – John Lennon is involved in an altercation with a photographer outside The Troubadour in Los Angeles, California. Lennon and friend Harry Nilsson have been heckling comedian Tommy Smothers and are forced to leave the club.
March 16 – Country music’s Grand Ole Opry moves to a new location at the Opryland USA theme park in Nashville, Tennessee
March 30 – The Ramones play their first concert at the Performance Studio in New York.
April 5 – Van Halen play their first gig on the Sunset Strip in Hollywood at Gazzarri’s.
April 6 – 200,000 music fans attend The California Jam rock festival. Artists performing at the event include Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Black Oak Arkansas, and the Eagles. Swedish group ABBA wins the 19th Eurovision Song Contest in The Dome, Brighton, England, with the song “Waterloo”, kickstarting their stellar international career.
April 14 – Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones, a concert movie filmed during the band’s 1972 North American Tour, premieres at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York.
April 16 – Queen play their first North American concert, opening for Mott the Hoople in Denver, Colorado.
April 25 – Pam Morrison, Jim Morrison’s widow, is found dead in her Hollywood apartment from an apparent heroin overdose.
May 7 – Led Zeppelin announces their new record label, Swan Song Records, with a lavish party at The Four Seasons Hotel in New York.
May 25 – Twenty years after it was recorded, “Rock Around the Clock” by Bill Haley and His Comets returns to the Billboard Top 40, after it gains renewed popularity from its use in the film American Graffiti and the TV series Happy Days.
May 28 – Experimental orchestra, the Portsmouth Sinfonia, plays a concert at the Royal Albert Hall, with its regular conductor John Farley. The performers included Michael Nyman and Brian Eno.
June 5 – Patti Smith records “Hey Joe”, her debut single which arguably becomes the first punk rock single when released in August.
June 14 – David Bowie launches his Diamond Dogs tour at the Montreal Forum. One year previously Bowie had announced he was retiring from touring as Ziggy Stardust.
July 4 – Barry White marries Love Unlimited lead singer Glodean James.
July 19-21 – Ozark Music Festival is held in Sedalia, Missouri with a crowd estimated between 100,000 to 350,000 people.
July 20 – The first Knebworth Concert is held in England, headlined by The Allman Brothers Band.
July 29 – Having performed at two sold-out concerts at the London Palladium, ‘Mama’ Cass Elliot dies in her sleep after suffering a heart attack in a Mayfair flat in London, aged 32. Neil Peart officially joins Rush.
August 7 – Peter Wolf, lead singer of The J. Geils Band, marries actress Faye Dunaway.
August 17 – Ramones make their CBGB debut. The venue would help establish their place at the forefront of punk rock.
September 15 – Gary Thain of Uriah Heep is shocked on stage at the Moody Coliseum in Dallas, Texas and is seriously injured.
October 5 – AC/DC performs its first official show with Bon Scott as its new lead singer.
October 18 – Al Green is attacked in the shower by a girlfriend. She scalds his body with a pan of boiling grits and commits suicide a few moments later.
November 2 – George Harrison launches his “George Harrison & Friends North American Tour” in Vancouver. It’s Harrison’s first tour since the Beatles North American Tour of 1966.
November 21 – Wilson Pickett is arrested in Andes, New York after allegedly firing a bullet through the door of a hotel room he was staying at while on a hunting trip with The Isley Brothers.
November 28 – John Lennon joins Elton John on stage at Madison Square Garden for three songs. It would be Lennon’s last stage performance.
December 12 – Mick Taylor leaves The Rolling Stones after 6 years.
December 31 – Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks join Fleetwood Mac. The third annual New Year’s Rockin’ Eve, moving this year from NBC to ABC, is aired with performances by Herbie Hancock, The Beach Boys, Chicago, Olivia Newton-John and The Doobie Brothers.

Feature Year: 1974 9am ET

1974January 3 – Bob Dylan and The Band kick off their 40-date concert tour at Chicago Stadium. It’s Dylan’s first time on the road since 1966.
January 17 – Joni Mitchell releases her monumental album Court and Spark, supported by the single “Help Me” reaching the highest moment of commercial success.  Dino Martin, singer and son of Dean Martin, is arrested on suspicion of possession and sale of two machine guns.
February 10 – record producer Phil Spector is badly injured in a car accident. Details of the accident are kept secret.
February 12 – New York’s rock club, Bottom Line, opens in Greenwich Village. The first headlining act is Dr. John.
February 14 – The Captain & Tennille are married in Virginia City, Nevada.
February 16 – Two years of litigation between Grand Funk and former manager Terry Knight are finally resolved. The band gets the rights to its name but Knight wins a cash settlement.
February 18 – Yes sells out the first of two nights at Madison Square Garden, without a bit of advertising for the show.  Kiss releases their self-titled debut album.
February 19 – The first American Music Awards are broadcast on ABC, two weeks before the Grammys.
February 20 – Cher files for divorce from her husband of 10 years, Sonny Bono.
March 12 – John Lennon is involved in an altercation with a photographer outside The Troubadour in Los Angeles, California. Lennon and friend Harry Nilsson have been heckling comedian Tommy Smothers and are forced to leave the club.
March 16 – Country music’s Grand Ole Opry moves to a new location at the Opryland USA theme park in Nashville, Tennessee
March 30 – The Ramones play their first concert at the Performance Studio in New York.
April 5 – Van Halen play their first gig on the Sunset Strip in Hollywood at Gazzarri’s.
April 6 – 200,000 music fans attend The California Jam rock festival. Artists performing at the event include Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Black Oak Arkansas, and the Eagles.  Swedish group ABBA wins the 19th Eurovision Song Contest in The Dome, Brighton, England, with the song “Waterloo”, kickstarting their stellar international career.
April 14 – Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones, a concert movie filmed during the band’s 1972 North American Tour, premieres at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York.
April 16 – Queen play their first North American concert, opening for Mott the Hoople in Denver, Colorado.
April 25 – Pam Morrison, Jim Morrison’s widow, is found dead in her Hollywood apartment from an apparent heroin overdose.
May 7 – Led Zeppelin announces their new record label, Swan Song Records, with a lavish party at The Four Seasons Hotel in New York.
May 25 – Twenty years after it was recorded, “Rock Around the Clock” by Bill Haley and His Comets returns to the Billboard Top 40, after it gains renewed popularity from its use in the film American Graffiti and the TV series Happy Days.
May 28 – Experimental orchestra, the Portsmouth Sinfonia, plays a concert at the Royal Albert Hall, with its regular conductor John Farley. The performers included Michael Nyman and Brian Eno.
June 5 – Patti Smith records “Hey Joe”, her debut single which arguably becomes the first punk rock single when released in August.
June 14 – David Bowie launches his Diamond Dogs tour at the Montreal Forum. One year previously Bowie had announced he was retiring from touring as Ziggy Stardust.
July 4 – Barry White marries Love Unlimited lead singer Glodean James.
July 19-21 – Ozark Music Festival is held in Sedalia, Missouri with a crowd estimated between 100,000 to 350,000 people.
July 20 – The first Knebworth Concert is held in England, headlined by The Allman Brothers Band.
July 29 – Having performed at two sold-out concerts at the London Palladium, ‘Mama’ Cass Elliot dies in her sleep after suffering a heart attack in a Mayfair flat in London, aged 32.  Neil Peart officially joins Rush.
August 7 – Peter Wolf, lead singer of The J. Geils Band, marries actress Faye Dunaway.
August 17 – Ramones make their CBGB debut. The venue would help establish their place at the forefront of punk rock.
September 15 – Gary Thain of Uriah Heep is shocked on stage at the Moody Coliseum in Dallas, Texas and is seriously injured.
October 5 – AC/DC performs its first official show with Bon Scott as its new lead singer.
October 18 – Al Green is attacked in the shower by a girlfriend. She scalds his body with a pan of boiling grits and commits suicide a few moments later.
November 2 – George Harrison launches his “George Harrison & Friends North American Tour” in Vancouver. It’s Harrison’s first tour since the Beatles North American Tour of 1966.
November 21 – Wilson Pickett is arrested in Andes, New York after allegedly firing a bullet through the door of a hotel room he was staying at while on a hunting trip with The Isley Brothers.
November 28 – John Lennon joins Elton John on stage at Madison Square Garden for three songs. It would be Lennon’s last stage performance.
December 12 – Mick Taylor leaves The Rolling Stones after 6 years.
December 31 – Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks join Fleetwood Mac. 

Time Sweep with Dominic Forbes 12pm ET @softrockjock

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