Wednesday 11am: Spot Light Artist – Foreigner

April 17, 2019
Editor In Chief

Foreigner is an English-American rock band, originally formed in New York City in 1976 by veteran English musician and ex-Spooky Tooth member Mick Jones, and fellow Briton and ex-King Crimson member Ian McDonald along with American vocalist Lou Gramm.

Jones came up with the band’s name as he, McDonald and Dennis Elliott were British, while Gramm, Al Greenwood and Ed Gagliardi were American. Their biggest hit single, “I Want to Know What Love Is”, topped the United Kingdom and United States charts among others. They are one of the world’s best-selling bands of all time with worldwide sales of more than 80 million records, including 37.5 million records in the US.

On November 9, 2018, all surviving original members of Foreigner came on stage to play alongside the current line-up for a show at Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles, beginning a series of “Foreigner Then and Now” concerts set to run through the end of the year.

Tuesday 11am: Spot Light Artist – Gerry Rafferty

April 16, 2019
Editor In Chief

Gerald “Gerry” Rafferty (April 16, 1947 – January 4, 2011) was a Scottish rock singer-songwriter known for his solo hits “Baker Street”, “Right Down the Line” and “Night Owl”, as well as “Stuck in the Middle with You”, recorded with the band Stealers Wheel.

Rafferty was born into a working-class family in Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland. His mother taught him both Irish and Scottish folk songs as a boy; later, he was influenced by the music of The Beatles and Bob Dylan. He joined the folk-pop group The Humblebums in 1969. After they disbanded in 1971, he recorded his first solo album, Can I Have My Money Back? Rafferty and Joe Egan formed the group Stealers Wheel in 1972 and produced several hits, most notably “Stuck in the Middle with You” and “Star”. In 1978, he recorded his second solo album, City to City, which included “Baker Street”, his most popular song.

Monday 11am: Spot Light Artist – Dave Edmunds

April 15, 2019
Editor In Chief

David William “Dave” Edmunds (born April 15, 1944) is a Welsh singer/songwriter, guitarist, actor and record producer. Although he is mainly associated with pub rock and new wave, having many hits in the 1970s and early 1980s, his natural leaning has always been towards 1950s style rock and roll.

Friday 11am: Spot Light Artist – Vince Gill

April 12, 2019
Editor In Chief

Vincent Grant Gill (born April 12, 1957) is an American country singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist. He has achieved commercial success and fame both as front man to the country rock band Pure Prairie League in the 1970s and as a solo artist beginning in 1983, where his talents as a vocalist and musician have placed him in high demand as a guest vocalist and a duet partner.

He has recorded more than 20 studio albums, charted over 40 singles on the U.S. Billboard charts as Hot Country Songs, and has sold more than 26 million albums. He has been honored by the Country Music Association with 18 CMA Awards, including two Entertainer of the Year awards and five Male Vocalist Awards. As of 2017, Gill has also earned 21 Grammy Awards, more than any other male country music artist. In 2007 he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. On February 4, 2016, Gill was inducted into the Guitar Center Rock Walk by Joe Walsh of the Eagles. In 2017, Vince Gill and Deacon Frey were hired by the Eagles in place of the late Glenn Frey.

Gill has been married to singer Amy Grant since March 2000.

Thursday 11am: In Memoriam – Earl Thomas Conley (1941 – 2019)

April 11, 2019
Editor In Chief

Earl Thomas Conley (October 17, 1941 – April 10, 2019) was an American country music singer-songwriter. Between 1980 and 2003, he recorded ten studio albums, including seven for the RCA Records label. In the 1980s and into the 1990s, Conley also charted more than 30 singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, of which 18 reached Number One. Conley’s 18 Billboard Number One country singles during the 1980s marked the most Number One hits by any artist in any genre during that decade except for Alabama and Ronnie Milsap.

Throughout his career, Conley’s music has been referred to as “thinking man’s country.” This is because the narrator looks into the heart and soul of his characters in each song.

Conley was born in Portsmouth, Ohio, and when he was 14, his father lost his job with the railroad, forcing the young boy to move in with his older sister in Jamestown, Ohio. He was offered a scholarship to an art school, but rejected it in favor of joining the U.S. Army. While in the Army, Conley became a member of a Christian-influenced trio, where his musical talent and vocal ability first began.

Conley then decided to consider performing as a serious career option. He shifted more deeply into the classic country sounds of artists such as Merle Haggard and George Jones. During this period he first tried his hand at songwriting.

In 1968, after his discharge from the Army, Conley began commuting from Dayton to Nashville. In 1973 while in Nashville, Conley met Dick Heard, who produced country music singer Mel Street. This meeting eventually led to the Conley-Heard collaboration on the song “Smokey Mountain Memories,” which made the top 10 for Street. After being honorably discharged from the military, he began playing in clubs in Nashville, Tennessee, at night, supporting himself working blue-collar jobs during the day.

Feeling that he wasn’t making any progress in Nashville, Conley moved to Huntsville, Alabama, to work in a steel mill. There, he met record producer Nelson Larkin, who helped him sign with independent record label GRT in 1974. Conley released four singles on that label, none of which became large hits. At the same time, he was selling songs that he had written to other artists, including Conway Twitty and Mel Street, who were having much success with them.

Conley returned to Nashville, now writing for Nelson Larkin’s publishing house. In 1979, he signed a recording contract with Warner Bros. Records. Two years later, he had his first Top 40 hit, “Dreamin’s All I Do”. He left the label in 1979 and joined Sunbird Records, where he again worked with Nelson Larkin.

This time, Conley found success, with a Top Ten and a Number One single within the next two years. He continued to have success over the next few years, and in 1983, he was nominated for multiple Grammy Awards for his song “Holding Her and Loving You”. He set a record the following year as the first artist in any genre to have four Number One singles from the same album.

In 1986, Conley was credited with breaking down country music barriers when he duet with pop/R&B singer Anita Pointer of the Grammy-winning Pointer Sisters. Their single, “Too Many Times,” the title track to Conley’s 1986 album, reached #2 on the Country charts.

By the end of the 1980s, Conley began collaborating with Randy Scruggs (son of country singer Earl Scruggs), in the hopes that he could bring his music back to his country roots. His record sales began to drop in the 1990s, as country took a more, progressive turn, and Conley was dropped from his record label in 1992.

He took a seven-year recording hiatus between 1991 and 1997 due to a number of factors, including vocal problems, disenchantment with record label politics, road fatigue, and mental burnout. He began recording again in 1998. In late 2013, Conley gave a telephone interview with Pods o’ Pop. Conley recalls that he may be the only country artist to appear on the Soul Train television program (he performed his duet with Pointer) and goes into detail about the string of hits Randy Scruggs and he co-wrote.

In 2002, Blake Shelton charted in the Top 20 with “All Over Me,” which Conley co-wrote with Shelton and longtime friend, songwriter Michael Pyle.

Earl died on April 10, 2019, at 77 years old from complications of dementia – Wikipedia

Wednesday 11am: Spot Light Artist – Babyface

April 10, 2019
Editor In Chief

Kenneth Brian Edmonds (born April 10, 1959), known professionally as Babyface, is an American singer, songwriter and record producer. He has written and produced over 26 number-one R&B hits throughout his career, and has won 11 Grammy Awards. He was ranked number 20 on NME’s 50 Of The Greatest Producers Ever list.

Tuesday 11am: Spot Light Artist – Hal Ketchum

April 9, 2019
Editor In Chief

Hal Michael Ketchum (born April 9, 1953) is an American country music artist. He has released 11 studio albums since 1986, including nine for the Curb and Asylum-Curb labels. Ketchum’s 1991 album Past the Point of Rescue is his most commercially successful, having been certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America. Between 1991 and 2006 Ketchum had 17 entries on the Hot Country Songs charts. Three of his singles — “Small Town Saturday Night,” “Past the Point of Rescue” and “Hearts Are Gonna Roll” — all reached number 2 on this chart, and three more charted within the Top Ten: “Sure Love” at number 3, and “Mama Knows the Highway” and “Stay Forever,” both at number 8.

In June 1998, Ketchum was diagnosed with a neurological disorder called acute transverse myelitis, an ailment of the spinal column, which left Ketchum without the use of the left side of his body. He had to relearn basic tasks, including how to walk and play the guitar. His mother died at an early age from multiple sclerosis, the sister disease to acute transverse myelitis, from which he also suffers.

Ketchum is also a painter and his work has been shown in Santa Fe, New Mexico’s Pena Gallery, where he had an art-show opening in 2002. He also is a master carpenter and enjoys making toys.

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