Tag: Feature Artist

Wednesday 6/29/22 10am ET: Feature Artist & Feature LP: Colin Hay – Now and The Evermore (2022)

Colin James Hay (born June 29, 1953) is a Scottish-born Australian-American musician, singer, songwriter, and actor. He came to prominence as the lead vocalist of the band Men at Work and later as a solo artist. Hay’s music has been used frequently by actor and director Zach Braff in his work, which helped a career rebirth in the mid-2000s. Hay has also been a member of Ringo Starr’s Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band.

Hay has made appearances in movies such as Cosi and in television shows such as The Larry Sanders Show, JAG, The Mick Molloy Show, A Million Little Things, and Scrubs. along with episodes of ABC’s What About Brian, NBC’s The Black Donnellys, CBS’s Cane, and the BBC hospital drama Casualty, have included performances of some of his previous songs; in Scrubs he performs an acoustic version of the Men at Work hit “Overkill”.

Feature Album: Now and The Evermore (Released March 18, 2022)

1 Now and the Evermore 3:37
2 Love Is Everywhere 3:48
3 Into the Bright Lights 3:30
4 The Sea of Always 3:27
5 Starfish and Unicorns 3:29
6 A Man Without a Name 3:38
7 Undertow 3:39
8 All I See Is You 3:52
9 Agatha Bell 3:32
10 When Does the End Begin? 3:33

David Angell Violin
Gregg Bissonette Drums, Percussion
Alec Blazek Trumpet
Jimmy Branly Drums
Matt Coles Drums (Snare), Engineer, Mixing
David Davidson Violin
Jimmy Earl Guitar (Bass)
Chad Fischer Drums (Snare), Engineer, Vocals (Background)
Michael Georgiades Composer, Guitar (Acoustic)
Scheila Gonzalez Saxophone
Colin Hay 6-String Guitar, Choir/Chorus, Composer, Engineer, Guitar (12 String), Guitar (Acoustic), Guitar (Baritone), Guitar (Bass), Guitar (Electric), Primary Artist, Producer, Slide Guitar, Vocals
John Hineloy Trombone
Jim Hoke Pedal Steel Guitar
Eric Jorgensen Trombone
Fred Kron Brass Arrangement, Glockenspiel, Keyboards, Mellotron, Organ, Organ (Hammond), Piano, Piano (Electric), Pump Organ, String Arrangements, Strings, Toy Piano
Elizabeth Lamb Viola
Gilbert Long Tuba
Michael McGoldrick Whistle
Cecilia Noël Harmony, Vocals (Background)
San Miguel Perez Bongos, Guitar (Acoustic), Guitar (Baritone), Guitar (Electric), Hi String Guitar (Acoustic), Percussion, Tambourine, Tres, Vocals (Background)
Jordan Perlson Drums, Percussion
Sari Reist Cello
Ringo Starr Drums
Patrick Walle Horn
Garry West Bass, Guitar (Bass), Producer, Versao
Reese Wynans Organ (Hammond)

Tuesday 6/28/22 11am ET: Feature Artist: Jools Holland

Julian Miles Holland, OBE, DL (born 24 January 1958) is an English pianist, bandleader, singer, composer and television presenter. He was an original member of the band Squeeze and has worked with many artists including Jayne County, Sting, Eric Clapton, Mark Knopfler, George Harrison, David Gilmour, Magazine, The The, Ringo Starr and Bono.

From 1982 until 1987, he co-presented the Channel 4 music program The Tube. Since 1992, he has hosted Later… with Jools Holland, a music-based show aired on BBC2, on which his annual show Hootenanny is based. Holland is a published author and appears on television shows besides his own and contributes to radio shows. In 2004 he collaborated with Tom Jones on an album of traditional R&B music.

On BBC Radio 2 Holland also regularly hosts the weekly program Jools Holland, a mix of live and recorded music and general chat and features studio guests, along with members of his orchestra.

Tuesday 6/28/22 10am ET: Feature Artist: Kellie Pickler

Kellie Dawn Pickler (born June 28, 1986) is an American country music singer, songwriter, and television personality. Pickler gained fame as a contestant on the fifth season of American Idol and finished in sixth place. In 2006, she signed to 19 Recordings and BNA Records as a recording artist. Her debut album, Small Town Girl, was released later that year and has sold over 900,000 copies. The album, which was certified gold by the RIAA, produced three singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts: “Red High Heels” at No. 15, “I Wonder” at No. 14, and “Things That Never Cross a Man’s Mind” at No. 16.

Pickler released her self-titled second album in 2008 that produced four singles: “Don’t You Know You’re Beautiful” at No. 21, “Best Days of Your Life” at No. 9 (which she co-wrote with Taylor Swift), “Didn’t You Know How Much I Loved You” at No. 14, and “Makin’ Me Fall in Love Again” at No. 30.

In 2012, Pickler was ranked as the 14th best American Idol alumna. In October 2012, she parted ways with her former record label and signed with Black River Entertainment.

On May 21, 2013, Pickler and her partner, Derek Hough, were declared the winners of the sixteenth season of Dancing with the Stars. In 2016, she was inducted into the North Carolina Music Hall of Fame.

From 2017 to 2019, she co-hosted the nationally syndicated daytime TV talk show Pickler & Ben with comedian Ben Aaron.

Monday 6/27/22 10am ET: Feature Artist: Lorrie Morgan

Loretta Lynn Morgan (born June 27, 1959) is an American country music singer. She is the daughter of George Morgan, widow of Keith Whitley, and ex-wife of Jon Randall and Sammy Kershaw, all of whom are also country music singers. Morgan has been active as a singer since the age of 13, and charted her first single in 1979. She achieved her greatest success between 1988 and 1999, recording for RCA Records and the defunct BNA Records. Her first two RCA albums (Leave the Light On and Something in Red) and her BNA album Watch Me are all certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). The 1995 compilation Reflections: Greatest Hits is her best-selling album with a double-platinum certification; War Paint, Greater Need, and Shakin’ Things Up, also on BNA, are certified gold.

Morgan has made more than forty chart entries on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, including three number-one singles: “Five Minutes”, “What Part of No”, and “I Didn’t Know My Own Strength”, and eleven additional top-ten hits. Morgan has recorded in collaboration with her father, as well as Whitley, Randall, Kershaw, Frank Sinatra, Johnny Mathis, Tammy Wynette, The Beach Boys, Dolly Parton, Andy Williams, the New World Philharmonic, and Pam Tillis. She is also a member of the Grand Ole Opry. Morgan’s musical style is defined largely by country pop influences and her dramatic singing voice, with frequent stylistic comparisons to Tammy Wynette.

Thursday 6/23/22 9am ET: Feature Artist: Jason Mraz

Jason Thomas Mraz (born June 23, 1977) is an American guitarist, singer and songwriter. He rose to prominence with the release of his debut studio album, Waiting for My Rocket to Come (2002), which spawned the single “The Remedy (I Won’t Worry)”, that reached the top 20 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[5] His next two studio albums, Mr. A-Z (2005), and We Sing. We Dance. We Steal Things. (2008), peaked in the top five on the Billboard 200; with the latter album spawning the Grammy Award winning singles “Make It Mine”, and “Lucky” with Colbie Caillat.

The album’s lead single “I’m Yours”, reached the top ten on the Billboard Hot 100, while spending a then-record 76 weeks on the Hot 100, and was certified Diamond by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). His fourth album, Love Is a Four Letter Word (2012), peaked at number two on the Billboard 200, becoming his highest-charting album to date, and spawned the single “I Won’t Give Up”, which became his second top ten on the Hot 100.

Along with receiving two Grammy Award wins, Mraz is also the recipient of two Teen Choice Awards, a People’s Choice Award and the Hal David Songwriters Hall of Fame Award. As of July 2014, Mraz has sold over seven million albums, and over 11.5 million in digital singles. His musical style, from rhythmic feeling to his use of nylon string guitars, has been heavily influenced by Brazilian music.

On October 25, 2015, Mraz married his girlfriend, Christina Carano, in a private ceremony in his hometown of Mechanicsville, Virginia.

In June 2018, Mraz penned a “love letter” to the LGBT community, as part of a Billboard feature during gay pride month. A line in the poem, “I am bi your side. / All ways” led some media reports to state that the poem represented Mraz’s coming out as bisexual. In an article published on July 19, 2018, by Billboard, Mraz said he has had previous experiences with men, even while dating Carano. Mraz said Carano defined him as a “two-spirit”, a description that was criticized by some as misappropriating a word originally designed solely for the native population, and for distorting the term’s meaning. In August 2018, Mraz confirmed in an interview with the New York Post that he now identifies as bisexual, speaking of the burden of being closeted (“I honestly didn’t know how to come out and sing these happy love songs…”; “It was tough, ’cause not even my mom knew it, you know? […] And I realized that’s the struggle that people in the LGBT community have. It can be a very stressful secret that we carry”) and the lack of backlash once he came out (“And I think that’s the cosmic joke. We carry around these secrets, and then once you say something, nobody cares”).

Monday 6/20/22 10:30am ET: Feature Artist: Lionel Richie

Lionel Brockman Richie, Jr. (born June 20, 1949) is an American singer, songwriter, musician, record producer, and television judge. He rose to fame in the 1970s as a songwriter and the co-lead singer of funk band the Commodores; writing and recording the hit singles “Easy”, “Sail On”, “Three Times a Lady” and “Still”, with the group before his departure. In 1980, he wrote and produced the US Billboard Hot 100 number one single “Lady” for Kenny Rogers. The following year, he wrote and produced the single “Endless Love”, which he recorded as a duet with Diana Ross; it remains among the top 20 bestselling singles of all time, and the biggest career hit for both artists. In 1982, he officially launched his solo career with the album Lionel Richie, which sold over four million copies and spawned the singles “You Are”, “My Love”, and the number one single “Truly”.

His second album, Can’t Slow Down (1983), reached number one on the US Billboard 200 chart and sold over 20 million copies worldwide, becoming one of the best-selling albums of all time; and spawned the number one singles “All Night Long (All Night)” and “Hello”. He then co-wrote the 1985 charity single “We Are the World” with Michael Jackson, which sold over 20 million copies. His third album, Dancing on the Ceiling (1986), spawned the number one single “Say You, Say Me” (from the 1985 film White Nights) and the No. 2 hit title track. From 1986 to 1996, Richie took a break from recording; he has since then released seven studio albums. He has joined the singing competition American Idol to serve as a judge, starting from its sixteenth season.

During his solo career, Richie became one of the most successful balladeers of the 1980s, and has sold over 100 million records worldwide, making him one of the world’s best-selling artists of all time. He has won four Grammy Awards, including Song of the Year for “We Are the World”, and Album of the Year for Can’t Slow Down. “Endless Love” was nominated for an Academy Award; while “Say You, Say Me” won both the Academy Award and the Golden Globe award for Best Original Song. In 2016, Richie received the Songwriters Hall of Fame’s highest honor, the Johnny Mercer Award. In 2022, he was inducted into the Black Music & Entertainment Walk of Fame and received the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song by the Library of Congress. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2022.

Thursday 6/16/22 9am ET: Feature Artist: Amazing Rhythm Aces

The Amazing Rhythm Aces is an American country rock group, which has characterized its music as “American music” or “roots music”—a blend of rock, country, blues, R&B, folk, reggae, and Latino. The band is best known for its 1975 hit “Third Rate Romance”. They have released 18 albums over 30 years (a period including a 15-year hiatus). The band’s music is distinguished by its eclectic scope, literate and often quirky lyrics, and distinctive vocals by lead singer and songwriter Russell Smith.

Members of the Aces played in Fatback, a local band in Knoxville, Tennessee, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, consisting of vocalist and guitarist Russell Smith, bassist Jeff “Stick” Davis, drummer Butch McDade (born David Hugh McDade in Clarksdale, Missouri; February 24, 1946 – November 29, 1998), and Fatback’s first lead guitarist Mike Brooks and later Dan Kennedy. The band left Knoxville in the early 1970s.

In 1972, the Aces came together in Memphis, Tennessee, at the recommendation of Barry “Byrd” Burton (born in Greene County, Tennessee; September 7, 1946 – March 10, 2008), who was engineering and producing at the Sam Phillips Recording Studio in Memphis. Davis and McDade, who had recorded and toured with singer-songwriter Jesse Winchester as “The Rhythm Aces”, recruited Smith, keyboardist Billy Earheart III, lead guitarist and multi-instrumentalist Burton, and pianist James Hooker to develop a sound mixing of pop, country, and blue-eyed soul.

Stacked Deck, their debut album, released in 1975, resulted in two crossover (rock and country) hits, “Third Rate Romance” and “Amazing Grace (Used to Be Her Favorite Song),” the group’s lone Top 10 country single. In 1976, “The End Is Not in Sight (The Cowboy Tune),” from the album Too Stuffed to Jump, won a Grammy for Country Vocal Performance by a Group. “Third Rate Romance” reached No. 1 on the Canadian pop/rock charts. These tracks were engineered by Burton, who produced their first three albums.

Burton left the group after the release of Toucan Do It Too in 1977 and was replaced by Duncan Cameron.

In 1978, the Aces released Burning the Ballroom Down, followed the next year by a self-titled album featuring songs with Joan Baez, Tracy Nelson and the Muscle Shoals Horns. Both albums received critical approval but sold poorly. They released another album, How the Hell Do You Spell Rhythum, before disbanding.

Smith became a successful songwriter and had some minor successes on the country charts as a solo artist and successfully composed songs for other performers such as Ricky Van Shelton, T. Graham Brown, and Randy Travis. Earheart joined Hank Williams, Jr.’s Bama Band, and Cameron joined Sawyer Brown, a group that found significant chart success in the 1980s with a sound similar to the Amazing Rhythm Aces. Hooker joined Nanci Griffith’s band, the Blue Moon Orchestra, in 1987 and became its leader. Hooker retired from touring in 2007 and lives in County Tipperary, Ireland, and Mallorca, Spain, where he continues to keep an active writing and recording schedule.

McDade died of bladder cancer on November 29, 1998, only months after the release of Out of the Blue. He was 52.

Burton became a successful producer and session guitarist. He released a solo instrumental country album, Byrd Braynz (ADF Records), in 2002. He died on March 10, 2008, from complications of myelodysplastic syndrome, a rare form of blood cancer, at the age of 61.

The Aces re-formed in 1994. The group, composed of Smith, Davis, McDade, Earheart, Hooker, and new guitarist-mandolinist Danny Parks, released Ride Again, an album of new renditions of their biggest hits.

Wednesday 6/15/22 10am ET: Feature Artist: Harry Nilsson

Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994), sometimes credited as Nilsson, was an American singer-songwriter who achieved the peak of his commercial success in the early 1970s. His work is characterized by pioneering vocal overdub experiments, returns to the Great American Songbook, and fusions of Caribbean sounds. A tenor with a 3+1⁄2 octave range, Nilsson was one of the few major pop-rock recording artists to achieve significant commercial success without ever performing major public concerts or undertaking regular tours.

Born in Brooklyn, Nilsson moved to Los Angeles as a teenager to escape his family’s poor financial situation. While working as a computer programmer at a bank, he grew interested in musical composition and close-harmony singing, and was successful in having some of his songs recorded by various artists such as the Monkees. In 1967, he debuted on RCA Victor with the LP Pandemonium Shadow Show, followed by a variety of releases that include a collaboration with Randy Newman (Nilsson Sings Newman, 1970) and the original children’s story The Point! (1971). He created the first remix album (Aerial Pandemonium Ballet, 1971) and recorded the first mashup song (“You Can’t Do That”, 1967). His most commercially successful album, Nilsson Schmilsson (1971), produced the international top 10 singles “Without You” and “Coconut”. His other top 10 hit, “Everybody’s Talkin'” (1968), was featured prominently in the 1969 film Midnight Cowboy. A version of Nilsson’s “One”, released by Three Dog Night in 1969, also reached the U.S. top 10.

During a 1968 press conference, the Beatles were asked what their favorite American group was and answered “Nilsson”. Sometimes called “the American Beatle”, he soon formed close friendships with John Lennon and Ringo Starr. In the 1970s, Nilsson, Lennon and Starr were members of the Hollywood Vampires drinking club, embroiling themselves in a number of widely publicized, alcohol-fueled incidents. They produced one collaborative album, Pussy Cats (1974). After 1977, Nilsson left RCA, and his record output diminished. In response to Lennon’s 1980 murder, he took a hiatus from the music industry to campaign for gun control. For the rest of his life, he recorded only sporadically. In 1994, Nilsson died of a heart attack while in the midst of recording what became his last album, Losst and Founnd (2019).

The craft of Nilsson’s songs and the defiant attitude he projected remain touchstones for later generations of indie rock musicians. Nilsson was voted No. 62 in Rolling Stone’s 2015 list of the “100 Greatest Songwriters of All Time”, where he was described as “a pioneer of the Los Angeles studio sound” and “a crucial bridge” between 1960s psychedelia and the 1970s singer-songwriter era. The RIAA certified Nilsson Schmilsson and Son of Schmilsson (1972) as gold records, indicating over 500,000 units sold each. He earned Grammy Awards for two of his recordings; Best Contemporary Vocal Performance, Male in 1970 for “Everybody’s Talkin'” and Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male in 1973 for “Without You”.

Born with congenital heart problems, Nilsson suffered a heart attack on February 14, 1993. After surviving that, he began pressing his former label, RCA Records, to release a boxed-set retrospective of his career, and resumed recording, attempting to complete one final album. He finished the vocal tracks for the album with producer Mark Hudson, who held onto the tapes of that session. Nilsson died of heart failure on January 15, 1994, in his Agoura Hills, California, home at the age of 52. In 1995, the 2-disc CD anthology he worked on with RCA, Personal Best, was released. The final album was eventually released on November 22, 2019, as Losst and Founnd. Nilsson is interred in the Valley Oaks Memorial Park at Westlake Village, California.

Thursday 6/9/22 9am ET: Feature Artist: Jackie Wilson

Jack Leroy Wilson Jr. (June 9, 1934 – January 21, 1984) was an American soul and rock and roll singer and performer. Wilson was a prominent figure in the transition of rhythm and blues into soul. He was considered a master showman and one of the most dynamic singers and performers in pop, R&B, and rock and roll history, earning the nickname “Mr. Excitement”.

Wilson gained initial fame as a member of the R&B vocal group Billy Ward and His Dominoes. He went solo in 1957 and scored over 50 chart singles spanning the genres of R&B, pop, soul, doo-wop, and easy listening. This included 16 Top 10 R&B hits, six of which ranked as number ones. On the Billboard Hot 100, Wilson scored 14 top 20 pop hits, six of which reached the top 10.

According to Larry Geller, who visited Wilson backstage in Las Vegas with Elvis Presley, the singer had a habit of taking a handful of salt tablets and drinking large amounts of water before each performance, to create profuse sweating. Wilson told Elvis Presley, “The chicks love it.”

On September 29, 1975, Wilson was one of the featured acts in Dick Clark’s Good Ol’ Rock and Roll Revue, hosted by the Latin Casino in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. He was in the middle of singing “Lonely Teardrops” when he suffered a massive heart attack. On the words “My heart is crying” he collapsed on stage; audience members applauded as they initially thought it was part of the act. Clark sensed something was wrong, then ordered the musicians to stop the music. Cornell Gunter of the Coasters, who was backstage, noticed Wilson was not breathing. Gunter was able to resuscitate him and Wilson was then rushed to a nearby hospital.

Medical personnel worked to stabilize Wilson’s vital signs, but the lack of oxygen to his brain caused him to slip into a coma. He briefly recovered in early 1976, and was even able to take a few wobbly steps, but slipped back into a semi-comatose state.

Wilson’s friend, fellow singer Bobby Womack, planned a benefit at the Hollywood Palladium to raise funds for Wilson on March 4. Wilson was deemed conscious but incapacitated in early June 1976, unable to speak but aware of his surroundings. He was a resident of the Medford Leas Retirement Center in Medford, New Jersey, when he was admitted into Memorial Hospital of Burlington County in Mount Holly, New Jersey, due to having trouble taking nourishment, according to his attorney John Mulkerin. Wilson’s friend Joyce McRae tried to become his caregiver while he was in a nursing home, but he was placed in the guardianship of his estranged wife Harlean Harris and her lawyer John Mulkerin in 1978.

Wilson died on January 21, 1984, at the age of 49 from complications of pneumonia. He was initially buried in an unmarked grave at Westlawn Cemetery near Detroit.

In 1987, fans raised money in a fundraiser spearheaded by an Orlando disc jockey “Jack the Rapper” Gibson to purchase a mausoleum. On June 9, 1987, his 53rd birthday, a ceremony was held and Wilson was interred in the mausoleum at Westlawn Cemetery in Wayne, Michigan. His mother Eliza Wilson, who died in 1975, was also placed in the mausoleum.

Wilson was posthumously inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. He is also inducted into the National Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame. Two of Wilson’s recordings were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. He was honored with the Rhythm and Blues Foundation’s Legacy Tribute Award in 2003. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked Wilson No. 69 on its list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, and number 26 as one of the greatest singers of all time.

Wednesday 6/6/22 11am ET: Feature Artist: Renaissance

Renaissance are an English progressive rock band, best known for their 1978 UK top 10 hit “Northern Lights” and progressive rock classics like “Carpet of the Sun”, “Mother Russia”, and “Ashes Are Burning”. They developed a unique sound, combining a female lead vocal with a fusion of classical, folk, rock, and jazz influences. Characteristic elements of the Renaissance sound are Annie Haslam’s wide vocal range, prominent piano accompaniment, orchestral arrangements, vocal harmonies, acoustic guitar, bass guitar, synthesizer, and versatile drum work. The band created a significant following in the northeast United States in the 1970s, and that region remains their strongest fan base.

The original line-up included two former members of the Yardbirds, Keith Relf and Jim McCarty, along with John Hawken, Louis Cennamo and Relf’s sister Jane Relf. They intended to put “something together with more of a classical influence”. Renaissance was born, and the band released a studio album in 1969, and another in 1971. Subsequently, John Tout replaced Hawken on keyboards, followed by a period of high turnover of musicians until the “classic line-up” of Annie Haslam, John Tout, Michael Dunford, Jon Camp, and Terry Sullivan was established, although none of them were in the original band. They were assisted with lyrics on many songs from Cornish poet Betty Thatcher-Newsinger. From 1972 to 1979 Renaissance released seven successful studio albums, toured extensively, and sold out three nights in a row at Carnegie Hall with Tony Cox conducting the New York Philharmonic.

The 1980s were a lean time for them, with personnel changes, and two relatively unsuccessful studio albums, leading to disbandment in 1987. Two different offshoots of Renaissance existed at the same time at one stage in the mid-1990s. The band re-formed in 1998 to record Tuscany, which was eventually released in 2001; however, they disbanded again the next year.

2009 heralded a new line-up for Renaissance, led by Haslam and Dunford, and since then the band has continued to record and tour. Dunford died in November 2012. Later, Haslam stated that the band would continue touring. The current line-up is not as English as the band’s early period, with five U.S.-born members and one English-born member who lives in the United States. In 2013, Renaissance released the studio album Grandine il Vento, re-released the following year under the title Symphony of Light.

Wednesday 6/8/22 10am ET: Feature Artist: Boz Scaggs

William Royce “Boz” Scaggs (born June 8, 1944) is an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist. An early bandmate of Steve Miller in The Ardells and the Steve Miller Band, he began his solo career in 1969, though he lacked a major hit until his 1976 album Silk Degrees peaked at number 2 on the Billboard 200, and produced the hit singles “Lido Shuffle” and “Lowdown”. Scaggs produced two more platinum-certified albums in Down Two Then Left and Middle Man, the latter of which produced two top-40 singles “Breakdown Dead Ahead” and “Jojo”. After a hiatus for most of the 1980s, he returned to recording and touring in 1988, joining The New York Rock and Soul Revue and opening the nightclub Slim’s, a popular San Francisco music venue until it closed in 2020. He has continued to record and tour throughout the 1990s, 2000s, and 2010s, with his most recent album being 2018’s Out of the Blues.

Sunday 6/5/22 2pm ET: Feature LP: AC/DC – Back In Black (1980)

Back in Black is the seventh studio album by Australian rock band AC/DC. It was released on July 25, 1980 by Albert Productions and Atlantic Records. It is the band’s first album to feature lead singer Brian Johnson, following the death of previous lead singer Bon Scott.

After the commercial breakthrough of their 1979 album Highway to Hell, AC/DC was planning to record a follow-up, but in February 1980, Scott died from alcohol poisoning after a drinking binge. Instead of disbanding, they decided to continue on and recruited Johnson, who was previously vocalist for Geordie.

The album was composed by Johnson, Angus and Malcolm Young, and recorded over seven weeks in the Bahamas from April to May 1980 with producer Robert John “Mutt” Lange, who had worked on their previous album. Following its completion, the group mixed Back in Black at Electric Lady Studios in New York City. The album’s all-black cover was designed as a “sign of mourning” for Scott.

As their sixth international studio release, Back in Black was an unprecedented success. It has sold an estimated 50 million copies worldwide, and is one of the best-selling albums in music history. The band supported the album with a yearlong world tour, cementing them among the most popular music acts of the early 1980s. The album also received positive critical reception during its initial release, and it has since been included on numerous lists of “greatest” albums. Since its original release, the album has been reissued and remastered multiple times, most recently for digital distribution. On December 9, 2019, it was certified 25x Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).

1. “Hells Bells” 5:10
2. “Shoot to Thrill” 5:17
3. “What Do You Do for Money Honey” 3:33
4. “Given the Dog a Bone” 3:30
5. “Let Me Put My Love into You” 4:16

1. “Back in Black” 4:14
2. “You Shook Me All Night Long” 3:30
3. “Have a Drink on Me” 3:57
4. “Shake a Leg” 4:06
5. “Rock and Roll Ain’t Noise Pollution” 4:15

Brian Johnson – lead vocals
Angus Young – lead guitar
Malcolm Young – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
Cliff Williams – bass guitar, backing vocals
Phil Rudd – drums

Tuesday 5/31/22 11am ET: Feature Artist: Marmalade

Marmalade are a Scottish pop rock band originating from the east end of Glasgow, originally formed in 1961 as The Gaylords, and then later billed as Dean Ford and The Gaylords, recording four singles for Columbia (EMI). In 1966 they changed the band’s name to The Marmalade, and were credited as such on all of their subsequent recorded releases with CBS Records and Decca Records until 1972. Their greatest chart success was between 1968 and 1972, placing ten songs on the UK Singles Chart, and many overseas territories, including international hits “Reflections of My Life”, which reached #10 on the US Billboard Hot 100 Chart and #3 on the UK Chart in January 1970, and “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da”, which topped the UK chart in January 1969, the group becoming the first-ever Scottish group to top that chart.

The original members began to drift away in the early 1970s, resulting in the band departing Decca in 1972. In 1973 the first evolved line up of the band rejoined EMI Records and with their first record release became known simply as Marmalade. All subsequent record releases are credited similarly.

Graham Knight (an ongoing member from the pre-Marmalade “Dean Ford and The Gaylords” lineup) remained until September 2010. The band still exists, with many additional further evolved lineups including vocalist Sandy Newman, a member since 1975, touring the nostalgia circuit.

Tuesday 5/31/22 10am ET: Feature Artist: Vicki Sue Robinson

Vicki Sue Robinson (May 31, 1954 – April 27, 2000) was an American theatre and film actress, and singer, closely associated with the disco era of late 1970s pop music; she is most famous for her 1976 hit, “Turn the Beat Around”.

She gave her first public performance in 1960 at the age of six, when she accompanied her mother on stage at the Philadelphia Folk Festival. Ten years later, at the age of 16, while a student at the New Lincoln School, Robinson made her professional performing debut when she joined the Broadway cast of the musical Hair. Robinson remained with Hair for six weeks before moving to a new Broadway production, Soon, whose cast included Peter Allen, Barry Bostwick, Nell Carter and Richard Gere.

After the show’s short run, Robinson appeared in the Off-Broadway play Long Time Coming, Long Time Gone, in which she and Richard Gere played Mimi and Richard Fariña. New York magazine opined that Robinson “sings with gentle power, accompanying herself on guitar and dulcimer, and moves with astounding confidence.”

Robinson also had bit parts in the films Going Home (1971) and To Find A Man (1972). After a sojourn in Japan Robinson returned to Broadway in 1973, joining the cast of Jesus Christ Superstar.

Robinson made her recording debut as one of several Hair veterans invited to sing background on Todd Rundgren’s Something/Anything? album released in 1972. In 1973 she spent time in Japan with Itsuro Shimoda, with whom she did session work on his album Love Songs and Lamentations and toured nationally.

In 2011, Gold Legion.com digitally remastered and reissued Robinson’s four albums for RCA Records on CD along with bonus tracks and liner notes.

On April 27, 2000, 11 days after the release of Red Lipstick, Robinson died of cancer at her home in Wilton, Connecticut.

Monday 5/30/22 10am ET: Feature Artist: Kylie Minogue


Kylie Ann Minogue, AO, OBE (born May 28, 1968), often known simply as Kylie, is an Australian-British singer, songwriter and actress. She is the highest-selling female Australian artist of all time and has been recognized with several honorific nicknames, most notably the “Princess of Pop”. Minogue has also been known for reinventing herself in music and fashion throughout her career, being referred to as a style icon.

Born and raised in Melbourne, she has worked and lived in the United Kingdom since the 1990s. Minogue achieved recognition starring in the Australian soap opera Neighbors, where she played tomboy mechanic Charlene Robinson. She came to prominence as a recording artist in the late 1980s and released four bubblegum and dance-pop-influenced studio albums produced by Stock Aitken Waterman and released by PWL. By the time she released her fourth album in the early 1990s, she had amassed several top ten singles in the UK and Australia, including “I Should Be So Lucky”, “The Loco-Motion”, “Hand on Your Heart”, “Better the Devil You Know” and “Step Back in Time”. Minogue, however, felt alienated and dissatisfied with the little creative control she had over her music. In 1992, she left PWL and signed with Deconstruction Records, where she released Kylie Minogue (1994) and Impossible Princess (1997), both of which received positive reviews from critics, with the latter being often described as her most personal and best work. Returning to more mainstream dance-oriented music, Minogue signed to Parlophone and released her disco-influenced seventh studio album Light Years (2000), which was preceded by lead single “Spinning Around”. The follow-up, Fever (2001) became her best-selling album to date and was a breakthrough for Minogue in markets where she had little recognition previously. Its lead single, “Can’t Get You Out of My Head” became one of the most successful singles of the 2000s, selling over five million units.