Tag: Crystal Gayle

Tuesday 3pm ET: Feature Artist – Crystal Gayle

Crystal Gayle (born Brenda Gail Webb; January 9, 1951) is an American country music singer, songwriter, actress and record producer. Originally under the guidance of sister Loretta Lynn, Gayle soon developed her own MOR style. This new musical direction made her one of the most successful crossover artists of the 1970s and 80s. She is also noted for her floor-length hair.

Gayle began her career in the 1960s performing in the background of her siblings’ bands, most notably Loretta Lynn. Lynn helped her sign a recording contract with Decca Records in 1970. Having minor success, she was encouraged to develop her own musical identity. Under the direction of producer Allen Reynolds at United Artists Records, Gayle shifted towards a country pop style that was more sucessful. In 1975, “Wrong Road Again” became Gayle’s first major hit. However, it was in 1977 when Gayle achieved her biggest success with the single “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue”. The song topped the Billboard country chart, crossed over to the top five of the Billboard Hot 100, and became a major international hit.

Gayle continued having major country pop success from the late 1970s and through late 1980s. Her biggest hits included “Ready for the Times to Get Better” (1977), “Talking in Your Sleep” (1978), “Half the Way” (1979) and “You and I” (1982). In the 1990s, Gayle shifted artistic directions by recording various genres of music. This included an album of inspirational music entitled Someday (1995) and an album of standards called Crystal Gayle Sings the Heart and Soul of Hoagy Carmichael (1999). During the decade she also owned and operated a fine arts shop called “Crystal’s Fine Gifts and Jewelry”. Her most recent studio release appeared in 2019 and Gayle has since continued to tour throughout the world.

Gayle has won one Grammy Award and has been nominated for several others since the 1970s. She has also won five Academy of Country Music awards; those awards include receiving the Cliffie Stone Pioneer Award in 2016. In addition, she has won two Country Music Association awards and three American Music Awards. Rolling Stone ranked her among the 100 greatest country artists of all time and CMT ranked her within their list of the 40 greatest women of country music. Gayle has her own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and was inducted as a member of the Grand Ole Opry in 2017.

Sounds of The 70s with Dan Varroney 9am ET

Dan VarroneyJoin Dan Varroney with Sounds of the 70s today at 9:00 featuring the hits from this week in 1971, 1974, & 1979, including, Lou Rawls, Coven, Doobie Brothers, Undisputed Truth, Cher, Olivia Newton John, Andy Kim, Eric Clapton, John Denver, The Knack, Crystal Gayle,  Sammy Johns, Kiki Dee, Robert John, Night, Donna Summer & Chic. We’ll also feature Hamilton, Joe, Frank & Reynolds, Doobie Brothers, and John Denver. 

Artist Countdown: Patty Loveless Top 45 6p ET @theploveless

Patty LovelessPatty Loveless (born Patty Lee Ramey, January 4, 1957), is an American country music singer.

Since her emergence on the country music scene in late 1986 with her first (self-titled) album, Loveless has been one of the most popular female singers of the Neotraditional country movement, although she has also recorded albums in the Country pop and Bluegrass genres.

Loveless was born in Pikeville, Kentucky, and was raised in Elkhorn City, Kentucky and Louisville, Kentucky and rose to stardom thanks to her blend of honky tonk and country-rock, not to mention a plaintive, emotional ballad style. Her late-1980s records were generally quite popular, earning her comparisons to Patsy Cline, but most critics agree that she truly came into her own as an artist in the early 1990s.

To date, Loveless has charted more than forty singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, including five Number Ones. In addition, she has recorded fourteen studio albums (not counting compilations); in the United States, four of these albums have been certified platinum, while two have been certified gold.

She has been a member of the Grand Ole Opry since 1988. Loveless is also a distant cousin of Loretta Lynn and Crystal Gayle. She has been married twice, first to Terry Lovelace (1976–1986), from whom her professional name “Loveless” is derived, and to Emory Gordy, Jr. (1989–present), who is also her producer. (Source: Wikipedia)

Website http://www.pattyloveless.com

1 Blame It on Your Heart
2 I Try to Think About Elvis
3 You Don’t Even Know Who I Am
4 You Don’t Seem to Miss Me (with George Jones)
5 My Kind of Woman/My Kind of Man (with Vince Gill)
6 Timber, I’m Falling in Love
7 Chains
8 You Can Feel Bad
9 Lonely Too Long
10 She Drew a Broken Heart
11 On Down the Line
12 Hurt Me Bad (In a Real Good Way)
13 Don’t Toss Us Away
14 The Lonely Side of Love
15 Here I Am
16 If My Heart Had Windows
17 How Can I Help You Say Goodbye
18 Halfway Down
19 The Night’s Too Long
20 To Have You Back Again
21 Can’t Get Enough
22 Jealous Bone
23 The Trouble with the Truth
24 A Thousand Times a Day
25 Blue Memories
26 High on Love
27 Nothin’ but the Wheel
28 You Will
29 I’m That Kind of Girl
30 Can’t Stop Myself from Loving You
31 That’s the Kind of Mood I’m In
32 Wicked Ways
33 Lovin’ All Night
34 A Little Bit in Love
35 Blue Side of Town
36 Like Water into Wine
37 The Last Thing on My Mind
38 On Your Way Home
39 You Saved Me
40 Lonely Days, Lonely Nights
41 I Did
42 I Wanna Believe
43 Strong Heart
44 Keep Your Distance
45 Why Baby Why

Artist Countdown: Eddie Rabbitt Top 40 Hits 6pm ET @RadioMax

rabbittEdward Thomas “Eddie” Rabbitt (November 27, 1941 – May 7, 1998) was an American singer-songwriter and musician. His career began as a songwriter in the late 1960s, springboarding to a recording career after composing hits such as “Kentucky Rain” for Elvis Presley in 1970 and “Pure Love” for Ronnie Milsap in 1974. Later in the 1970s, Rabbitt helped to develop the crossover-influenced sound of country music prevalent in the 1980s with such hits as “Suspicions” and “Every Which Way but Loose.” His duets “Both to Each Other (Friends and Lovers)” and “You and I”, with Juice Newton and Crystal Gayle respectively, later appeared on the soap operas Days of Our Lives and All My Children.

On May 7, 1998 in Nashville, Eddie Rabbitt died from lung cancer at the age of 56. He had been diagnosed with the disease in March 1997 and had received radiation treatment and surgery to remove part of one lung.] His body was interred at Calvary Cemetery in Nashville, following a private burial on May 8. No media outlet reported the death until after the burial, at the family’s request, and the news came as a surprise to many in Nashville, including the performer’s agent who “had no idea Eddie was terminal” and had talked to him often, remarking that Rabbitt “was always upbeat and cheerful” in the final months of his life. Although he was widely believed to have been born in 1944 (this year can still be found in older publications and texts), it was revealed at the time of his death that he had died at age 56.  (Source: Wikipedia)

1 Step by Step
2 Every Which Way but Loose
3 I Love a Rainy Night
4 Drivin’ My Life Away
5 You and I (featuring Crystal Gayle)
6 Suspicions
7 You Can’t Run from Love
8 Someone Could Lose a Heart Tonight
9 You Put the Beat in My Heart
10 You Don’t Love Me Anymore
11 I Don’t Know Where to Start
12 Gone Too Far
13 Rocky Mountain Music
14 B-B-B-Burnin’ Up with Love
15 Nothing Like Falling in Love
16 I Just Want to Love You
17 A World Without Love
18 I Can’t Help Myself
19 Drinkin’ My Baby (Off My Mind)
20 The Best Year of My Life
21 Both to Each Other (Friends and Lovers) (featuring Juice Newton)
22 I Wanna Dance with You
23 The Wanderer
24 On Second Thought
25 Two Dollars in the Jukebox
26 We Can’t Go On Living Like This
27 Warning Sign
28 Pour Me Another Tequila
29 Repetitive Regret
30 Hearts on Fire
31 Runnin’ with the Wind
32 Gotta Have You
33 She’s Comin’ Back to Say Goodbye
34 Forgive and Forget
35 I Should Have Married You
36 It’s Lonely Out Tonite
37 You Get to Me
38 We Must Be Doin’ Somethin’ Right
39 American Boy
40 That’s Why I Fell in Love with You