Monday 9pm: Feature LP: Bob Dylan – Blood On The Tracks (1975) @bobdylantheband

Bob_Dylan_-_Blood_on_the_TracksBlood on the Tracks is the fifteenth studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released in January 1975 on Columbia Records. The album marked Dylan’s return to Columbia after a two-album stint with Asylum Records. Most of the lyrics on the album revolve around heartache, anger, and loneliness.

The album, which followed on the resurgence of critical acclaim for Dylan’s work after Planet Waves, was greeted enthusiastically by fans and critics. In the years following its release it has come to be regarded as one of his best albums; it is common for subsequent records to be labeled his “best since Blood on the Tracks.”. It is also commonly seen as a standard for confessional singer-songwriter albums; though Dylan has denied that the songs are autobiographical, his son Jakob Dylan has stated: “The songs are my parents talking. In 2003, the album was ranked number 16 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, and in 2004, it was placed at number 5 on Pitchfork Media’s list of the top 100 albums of the 1970s.

The album reached #1 on the Billboard 200 charts and #4 on the UK Albums Chart. The single “Tangled Up in Blue” peaked at #31 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. The album remains one of Dylan’s best-selling studio releases, with a double-platinum US certification by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) (Wikipedia)

All songs written and composed by Bob Dylan.

1. “Tangled Up in Blue” 5:42
2. “Simple Twist of Fate” 4:19
3. “You’re a Big Girl Now” 4:36
4. “Idiot Wind” 7:48
5. “You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go” 2:55
6. “Meet Me in the Morning” Sep 4:22
7. “Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts” 8:51
8. “If You See Her, Say Hello” 4:49
9. “Shelter from the Storm” 5:02
10. “Buckets of Rain” 3:22

 

 

Sunday 6pm: Feature Artist – Bob Dylan (1962 – 1975) (Part I)

Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman; May 24, 1941) is an American poetic songwriter, singer, painter, writer, and Nobel prize laureate. He has been influential in popular music and culture for more than five decades. Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s, when his songs chronicled social unrest. Early songs such as “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are a-Changin'” became anthems for the Civil Rights Movement and anti-war movement. Leaving behind his initial base in the American folk music revival, his six-minute single “Like a Rolling Stone”, recorded in 1965, enlarged the range of popular music.

Dylan’s lyrics incorporate a wide range of political, social, philosophical, and literary influences. They defied existing pop music conventions and appealed to the burgeoning counterculture. Initially inspired by the performances of Little Richard and the songwriting of Woody Guthrie, Robert Johnson, and Hank Williams, Dylan has amplified and personalized musical genres. His recording career, spanning more than 50 years, has explored the traditions in American song—from folk, blues, and country to gospel, rock and roll, and rockabilly to English, Scottish, and Irish folk music, embracing even jazz and the Great American Songbook. Dylan performs with guitar, keyboards, and harmonica. Backed by a changing lineup of musicians, he has toured steadily since the late 1980s on what has been dubbed the Never Ending Tour. His accomplishments as a recording artist and performer have been central to his career, but his songwriting is considered his greatest contribution.

Since 1994, Dylan has published seven books of drawings and paintings, and his work has been exhibited in major art galleries. As a musician, Dylan has sold more than 100 million records, making him one of the best-selling artists of all time. He has also received numerous awards including eleven Grammy Awards, a Golden Globe Award, and an Academy Award. Dylan has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Minnesota Music Hall of Fame, Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, and Songwriters Hall of Fame. The Pulitzer Prize jury in 2008 awarded him a special citation for “his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power.” In May 2012, Dylan received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. In 2016, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”. – Wikipedia

Sunday 12pm: Vinyl Resting Place with Willie B

bob-dylanThis week on the Vinyl Resting Place, we profile a fellow called Bob Dylan. Hey, if the Swedes think he’s such a big deal, might as well get in line. We’re preparing three hours of the Music of Mr Dylan – most performed by him, but there will be a few guest stars like Judy Collins, The Byrds, Manfred Mann and more.

Sunday with Ron Kovacs (8a – 12p) ET

SundayJoin Ron Kovacs for another edition of Sunday.  This week music from Fairport Convention, Jethro Tull, Steeleye Span, The Band, The Beach Boys, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Crosby, Stills & Nash, The Mamas & the Papas, Simon & Garfunkel, Ryan Adams, Joan Armatrading, Beck, Jackson Browne, Harry Chapin, Tracy Chapman, Jim Croce, Donovan, Bob Dylan, Dan Fogleberg, Steve Forbert, Ben Howard, Carole King, Mark Knopfler, Gordon Lightfoot, Van Morrison, Patrick Park, Ed Sheeran, Bruce Springsteen, Cat Stevens, Teddy Thompson, Eddie Vedder, Neil Young, Warren Zevon and more . .. .   Live starting 8am on RadioMaxMusic.

Feature LP: Bob Dylan – Shadows in the Night (2015) 9pm

Shadows in the Night is the thirty-sixth studio album by Bob Dylan, released by Columbia Records on February 3, 2015. For a Bob Dylan album, it is unusual in that none of the songs are original compositions. Instead, the album consists of covers of traditional pop standards made famous by Frank Sinatra, chosen by Dylan himself. On January 23, 2015, it was announced that 50,000 free copies would be given away to randomly selected AARP The Magazine readers.[3] Prior to the album’s release, Dylan recorded a cover of the tune “Full Moon and Empty Arms” and made it available for free streaming online on May 13, 2014.

1. “I’m a Fool to Want You” Frank Sinatra, Jack Wolf, Joel Herron 4:51
2. “The Night We Called It a Day” Matt Dennis, Tom Adair 3:24
3. “Stay with Me” Jerome Moross, Carolyn Leigh 2:56
4. “Autumn Leaves” Joseph Kosma, Jacques Prévert (French), Johnny Mercer (English) 3:02
5. “Why Try to Change Me Now” Cy Coleman, Joseph McCarthy 3:38
6. “Some Enchanted Evening” Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers 3:28
7. “Full Moon and Empty Arms” Buddy Kaye, Ted Mossman, Sergei Rachmaninoff 3:26
8. “Where Are You?” Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh 3:37
9. “What’ll I Do” Irving Berlin 3:21
10. “That Lucky Old Sun” Haven Gillespie, Beasley Smith 3:39

Artist Countdown: George Harrison Top 35 Hits 6pm ET

George Harrison, MBE (25 February 1943 – 29 November 2001), was an English musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and songwriter who achieved international fame as the lead guitarist of the Beatles. Although John Lennon and Paul McCartney were the band’s primary songwriters, most of their albums included at least one Harrison composition, including “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”, “Here Comes the Sun” and “Something”, which became the Beatles’ second-most-covered song.

Harrison’s earliest musical influences included Big Bill Broonzy, George Formby and Django Reinhardt; Chet Atkins, Chuck Berry and Ry Cooder were significant later influences. By 1965 he had begun to lead the Beatles into folk rock through his interest in the Byrds and Bob Dylan, and towards Indian classical music through his use of the sitar on “Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)”. He developed an interest in the Hare Krishna movement and became an admirer of Indian culture and mysticism, introducing them to the other members of the Beatles and their Western audience by incorporating Indian instrumentation in their music. After the band’s break-up in 1970, Harrison released the triple album All Things Must Pass, from which two hit singles originated. He also organised the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh with Ravi Shankar, a precursor for later benefit concerts such as Live Aid. Harrison was a music and film producer as well as a musician; he founded Dark Horse Records in 1974 and co-founded HandMade Films in 1978.

Harrison released several best-selling singles and albums as a solo performer, and in 1988 co-founded the platinum-selling supergroup the Traveling Wilburys. A prolific recording artist, he was featured as a guest guitarist on tracks by Badfinger, Ronnie Wood and Billy Preston, and collaborated on songs and music with Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton and Tom Petty, among others. Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 11 in their list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”.

Harrison’s first marriage, to Pattie Boyd, ended in divorce in 1977. The following year he married Olivia Trinidad Arias, with whom he had one son, Dhani. Harrison died in 2001, aged 58, from lung cancer. He was cremated and his ashes were scattered in the Ganges and Yamuna rivers in India, in a private ceremony according to Hindu tradition. He left almost £100 million in his will. – Wikipedia