Feature Year: 1968 (Part 1 – 9am – Part 2 – 9pm ET)

December 8, 2013
Editor In Chief

1968January 4 – Guitarist Jimi Hendrix is jailed by Stockholm police, after trashing a hotel room during a drunken fist fight with bassist Noel Redding.
January 6 – The Gibson Guitar Corporation patents its Gibson Flying V electric guitar design.
January 13 – Johnny Cash performs his famous concert at Folsom State Prison in California.
February 1 – Universal Studios offers the Doors $500,000 to star in a feature film, which is never made.
February 4 – The Bee Gees make their American television debut on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour.
February 12 – Jimi Hendrix is given an honorary high school diploma from Garfield High School in Seattle, Washington. Hendrix is also given the key to the city.
February 16 – The Beatles, Mike Love, Mia Farrow, Donovan and others travel to India to visit Maharishi Mahesh Yogi at Rishikesh.
February 18 – David Gilmour joins Pink Floyd, replacing founder Syd Barrett, who had checked himself into a psychiatric hospital.
February 21 – McGraw-Hill, Inc., outbids eight other publishers and pays $150,000 for the U.S. rights to Hunter Davies’ authorized biography of the Beatles.
February 22 – Florence Ballard of the Supremes is released from her contract with Motown.
March 1 – Johnny Cash and June Carter are married in Franklin, Kentucky, with Merle Kilgore as best man.
March 8 – Bill Graham opens the Fillmore East in an abandoned movie theater in New York City.
March 25 – The 58th and final new episode of The Monkees airs on NBC.
March 30 – The Yardbirds record their live album Live Yardbirds at the Anderson Theater.
April 4 – James Brown appears on national television, in an attempt to calm feelings of anger in the United States following the assassination of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.
April 6 – The 13th Eurovision Song Contest is held in the Royal Albert Hall, London. The winning song, Spain’s “La, la, la” is sung by Massiel, after Spanish authorities refused to allow Joan Manuel Serrat to perform it in Catalan. The UK finish in second place, just one point behind, with the song “Congratulations” sung by Cliff Richard, which goes on to outsell the winning Spanish entry throughout Europe.
April 7 – Singer/pianist/songwriter Nina Simone’s performance at Westbury Music Fair is dedicated to the late Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. The song “Why? (the king of love is dead)” by Gene Taylor is performed for the first time. the show was partially released on the Emmy nominated album Nuff Said (1968).
April 29 – The rock musical Hair opens on Broadway at the Biltmore Theatre.
May 4 – Mary Hopkin performs on the British TV show Opportunity Knocks. Hopkin catches the attention of model Twiggy, who recommends her to Paul McCartney. McCartney would soon sign Hopkin to Apple Records.
May 5 – Buffalo Springfield performs together for the last time in Long Beach, California.
May 7 – Aretha Franklin records her live LP Aretha In Paris at the Olympia Theater. Karlheinz Stockhausen begins composing his fifteen intuitive music works, Aus den sieben Tagen.
May 14 – At a press conference, John Lennon and Paul McCartney introduce the Beatles’ new business concept, Apple Corps, Ltd., a disastrously mismanaged entertainment company that included a recording studio, a record label, and clothing store.
May 26 – Blues artist Little Willie John dies in prison after being convicted of manslaughter.
May 30 – The Beatles begin recording The White Album (officially titled, simply, The Beatles). Sessions would span over 4 months, ending on October 14.
June 1 – David Ruffin is fired from The Temptations
June 20 – Martha Reeves & the Vandellas make their debut at the Copacabana in New York City, winning a rave review in the New York Times. The engagement was recorded but remains in the Motown vaults.
July 7 – The Yardbirds perform for the last time before disbanding.
July 18 – Mina presents her Italian white soul hits “Se stasera sono qui” and “Colpo al cuore”. The performance is transmitted live without playback from the Auditorio A of the Radiotelevisione Italiana regional headquarters in Naples.
August 1 – Jeff Beck Group releases their album Truth. A seminal work of heavy metal, it incorporates blues and hard rock. It introduced the talents of Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood.
August 4 – Yes performs for the first time, at a summer camp.
August 23 – Simon & Garfunkel give a live concert at the Hollywood Bowl, Hollywood, California. A recording is later released on CD in 1994 by Australian company Vigotone Records as Voices of Intelligent Dissent.
September 7 – Led Zeppelin performs for the first time, billed as The New Yardbirds (the Yardbirds had disbanded two months earlier, and guitarist Jimmy Page subsequently formed this new group).
September 14 – The two sons of singer Roy Orbison, 10-year-old Roy DeWayne Orbison and 6-year-old Anthony King Orbison, die in a house fire in Hendersonville, Tennessee. Orbison’s youngest son is saved.
September 15 – Song of Summer, Ken Russell’s noted TV documentary about Frederick Delius, is shown for the first time as part of the BBC’s Omnibus series. PocketDiscs are released in several test markets in the United States.
October 8 – The soundtrack for the 1968 film Romeo and Juliet is released, containing popular “What Is a Youth” tune.
November 8 – John and Cynthia Lennon are divorced.
November 15 – 500,000 people march in Washington, D.C. for peace, which becomes the largest anti-war rally in U.S. history. In attendance: Arlo Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Peter, Paul and Mary, John Denver, Mitch Miller, touring cast of Hair
November 17 – Diana Ross & the Supremes replace The Beatles’ hugely successful “Hey Jude” at number-one in the U.S. with “Love Child”; this would be the last of five turnovers at number-one between the two most successful music acts in America during the 1960s.
November 22 – The Beatles (also known as “The White Album”) by The Beatles is released. Also released is The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society by The Kinks.
November 26 – Cream plays their farewell concert at the Royal Albert Hall. It will be the last time Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce, and Ginger Baker play together until their 1993 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
December 2 – Jimi Hendrix’s manager Chas Chandler quits over differences with Hendrix during the recording of Electric Ladyland. Janis Joplin and Big Brother and the Holding Company perform their last concert together before Janis goes solo.
Elvis Presley’s 1968 Comeback Special airs on NBC.
December 9 – TCB airs on NBC starring Diana Ross & the Supremes and The Temptations, becoming the first variety special in America to feature an exclusively African American cast. Shinjuku Music Festival is broadcast for the first time by Nippon Cultural Broadcasting.
December 11 – The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus was filmed. Acts included The Rolling Stones, The Who, Taj Mahal, Jethro Tull, The Dirty Mac, and Marianne Faithful. This was the last appearance of Brian Jones as a member of The Rolling Stones.
December 20 – Peter Tork announces he is leaving The Monkees.
December 22 – The Animals reunite for one benefit concert at the Newcastle City Hall while Eric Burdon & The Animals are disbanding.

 

Feature LP: Paul McCartney – New (2013) 10pm ET

October 17, 2013
Editor In Chief

Paul_McCartney_-_NewNew is an album by Paul McCartney, released on 14 October 2013. It is his sixteenth studio album and his first since 2007’s Memory Almost Full to consist entirely of new compositions.  The album was executive produced by Giles Martin with production by Martin, Mark Ronson, Ethan Johns and Paul Epworth. McCartney has stated that the record was inspired by recent events in his life as well as memories of his pre-Beatles history, and that some of the arrangements are unlike his usual rock recordings.  Reception to the first single “New” and the album as a whole has been positive.  (Source: Wikipedia)

1. Save Us”   Paul Epworth 2:39
2. “Alligator”   Mark Ronson 3:27
3. “On My Way to Work”   Giles Martin 3:43
4. “Queenie Eye”   Epworth 3:47
5. “Early Days”   Ethan Johns 4:07
6. New”   Ronson 2:56
7. “Appreciate”   Martin 4:28
8. “Everybody Out There”   Martin 3:21
9. “Hosanna”   Johns 3:29
10. “I Can Bet”   Martin 3:21
11. “Looking at Her”   Martin 3:05
12. “Road” (includes “Scared” as a hidden track) Epworth, Martin (“Scared”) 7:39

 

Feature Year: 1973 9am ET

August 11, 2013
Editor In Chief

1973January 8 – British Rail authorities restrict Pipe Major Gordon Speirs to playing his bagpipes just one minute in every fifteen on Liverpool Street station, London, on grounds that his playing (part of a holiday campaign by the Scottish Tourist Board) “interferes with station business”.[1]
January 9 – Mick Jagger’s request for a Japanese visa is rejected on account of a 1969 drug conviction, putting an abrupt end to The Rolling Stones’ plans to perform in Japan during their forthcoming tour.
January 14
Elvis Presley’s Aloha From Hawaii Via Satellite television special is broadcast in over 40 countries around the world.
Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh is arrested for drug possession at his Marin County home.
January 18 – The Rolling Stones’ benefit concert for Nicaraguan earthquake victims raises over $350,000. On December 22, 1972, an earthquake destroyed Managua, the capital of Nicaragua.
January 21 – The Rolling Stones open their Pacific tour of Hawaii, Australia and New Zealand in Honolulu, Hawaii.
January 30 – Kiss perform their first concert, at the Coventry Club in Queens.
February 2 – The Midnight Special makes its debut as a regular series on NBC. Helen Reddy is the featured artist.
February 14 – David Bowie collapses from exhaustion after a performance at New York’s Madison Square Garden.
February 18 – The King Biscuit Flower Hour is first broadcast with performances by Blood, Sweat & Tears, The Mahavishnu Orchestra, and new artist Bruce Springsteen.
March 1
Leonard Bernstein conducts Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky‘s Violin Concerto for the first time in his career, with soloist Isaac Stern and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra.
The Joffrey Ballet’s Deuce Coupe Ballet opens. The ballet is set entirely to music by The Beach Boys.
Pink Floyd releases The Dark Side of the Moon, which goes on to become one of the best-selling albums of all time. The album debuts on the Billboard 200 on March 17, reaches #1 on April 28, and eventually logs the all-time record of 741 weeks on that chart.
March 5 – Jimi Hendrix’s former personal manager, Michael Jeffery, is killed in a plane crash. Jeffery was travelling from Majorca to England. All passengers on board the plane were killed.
March 6 – The New York Office of the US Immigration Department cancels John Lennon’s visa extension five days after granting it.
March 7 – The director of talent acquisition at Columbia Records, John H. Hammond, suffers a non-fatal heart attack following a performance by one of his most recent finds, Bruce Springsteen.
March 8 – Paul McCartney is fined $240 after pleading guilty to charges of growing marijuana outside his Scottish farm.
March 14 – The singers Stephen Stills and Véronique Sanson are married near Guildford, England.
March 24 – Lou Reed is bitten on the buttocks by a fan during a concert in Buffalo, New York.
April 2 – Capitol Records releases two collections of The Beatles’ greatest hits, The Beatles 1962-1966 and The Beatles 1967-1970 (commonly referred to as the “Red Album” and the “Blue Album”, respectively).
April 7 – In Luxembourg, the 18th Eurovision Song Contest is won by Luxembourg for the second consecutive year, this time with “Tu te reconnaîtras”, sung by Anne-Marie David. Spain finish in second place with “Eres Tú”, sung by Mocedades; the United Kingdom finish third with Cliff Richard singing “Power to All Our Friends”. The top three placed songs become international hits.
April 8 – Opening of the first La Rochelle Festival of Contemporary Music, under the direction of Claude Samuel. Featured composers include Karlheinz Stockhausen and Iannis Xenakis
April 15 – Tenth Royan Festival of International Contemporary Art begins, including concerts featuring music by Jean Barraqué and Horațiu Rădulescu, amongst others.
April 16 – Paul McCartney’s first solo television special, James Paul McCartney, airs on ABC. The special includes performances by McCartney and Wings.
April 18 – Violinist Jascha Heifetz deposits parts from his prized Guarnerius violin in the newly poured wet concrete of the foundation for the new Virginia Ramo Hall of Music, under construction at the University of Southern California, in order to ensure the building will be “in tune”, and to bring luck.
May 4 – July 29 – Led Zeppelin embarks on a tour of the United States, during which they set the record for highest attendance for a concert, 56,800, at the Tampa Stadium in Tampa, Florida. The record was previously held by The Beatles. Performances for the movie The Song Remains the Same are also filmed.
May 9 – Mick Jagger adds $150,000 of his own money to the $350,000 raised by The Rolling Stones’ January 18 benefit concert for the victims of the Nicaraguan earthquake.
May 12 – David Bowie is the first rock artist to perform at Earls Court Exhibition Centre.
May 13 – Daniel Barenboim collapses with a gastric upset during a concert at the Brighton Festival, but later had sufficiently recovered to be driven home.
May 23 – Don Robey sells Duke Records, Peacock Records and Backbeat Records to ABC Dunhill Records.
May 25 – Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells becomes the first release on Richard Branson’s newly-launched Virgin label.
June 4 – Ronnie Lane plays his last show with Faces at the Edmonton Sundown in London. Lane had informed the band three weeks earlier that he was quitting.
June 15 – The first Istanbul International Music Festival opens.
June 16 – Benjamin Britten’s opera Death in Venice, receives its première at Snape Maltings.
June 29 – The Scorpions play their first gig with Uli Roth at a festival in Vechta. Roth was originally intended as a temporary replacement for Michael Schenker, who had just been snapped up by U.F.O. earlier in the month.
June 30 – Ian Gillan quits Deep Purple.
July 1 – Slade play a sell-out Earls Court in London after two number one singles this year.
July 3 – David Bowie ‘retires’ his stage persona Ziggy Stardust in front of a shocked audience at the Hammersmith Odeon at the end of his British tour.
July 4 – Slade drummer Don Powell is critically injured in a car crash in Wolverhampton; his 20-year-old girlfriend is killed. With his life in danger, the band’s future is left in the balance. Powell recovered after surgery, and was able to join the band ten weeks later in New York, to record “Merry Xmas Everybody”.
July 13 – The Everly Brothers break up.Queen releases their debut album.
July 15 – Ray Davies of The Kinks makes an emotional outburst during a performance at White City Stadium, announcing he is quitting the group. He later recants the statement.
July 28 – Summer Jam at Watkins Glen rock festival is attended by 600,000, who see The Allman Brothers Band, The Band, and the Grateful Dead.
July 30 – Soviet officials grant permission for Gennadi Rozhdestvensky to accept a three-year appointment as chief conductor of the Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, the first time a Soviet orchestra conductor has been allowed to take up such a position outside of the Eastern Bloc.[2]
August 6 – Stevie Wonder is seriously injured in a car accident outside Durham, North Carolina, spending the next four days in a coma.
August 20 – The London Symphony Orchestra becomes the first British orchestra to take part in the Salzburg Festival.
August 25 – The Allman Brothers nearly suffer another tragedy when Butch Trucks crashes his car near Macon, Georgia, not far from where Duane Allman was killed two years earlier. Trucks survives with only a broken leg.
September 1 – The Rolling Stones open their European tour in Vienna, Austria.
September 20 – Jim Croce, Maury Muehleisen and four others die in a plane crash in Louisiana.
September 22 – Benita Valente makes her debut with the Metropolitan Opera, singing Pamina in The Magic Flute.
September 23 – The Roxy Theatre opens in West Hollywood, California.
September 27 – Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert premieres on syndicated television with a performance by The Rolling Stones.
October 6 – Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band become the national brass-band champions of Great Britain by defeating 18 other bands at the Albert Hall in London.[3]
October 12 – Genesis releases their 5th studio album Selling England by the Pound, one of there most commercially successful albums
October 13 – Family play their last concert at De Montfort Hall at Leicester Polytechnic (now De Montfort University) before splitting up for good. A farewell party at a local Holiday Inn after the show ends in a good-natured melee, with people jumping in or pushed into the motel pool.
October 17 – The 1973 oil crisis begins, causing shortages of the vinyl needed to manufacture records. A number of new albums are either delayed or only available in limited quantities until after the holiday season.
October 19 – The Who release Quadrophenia, one of their most critically acclaimed albums.
October 20 – Queen Elizabeth II opens Sydney Opera House.
November 1 – Kiss becomes the first act signed to Neil Bogart’s new label, Casablanca Records.
November 5 – Cellist Jacqueline du Pré is forced to retire because she has been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.[4]
November 7 – Harold Holt Ltd., agent for Jacqueline du Pré, deny newspaper reports that she will never perform again, while at the same time confirming she has been diagnosed with “a mild case of multiple sclerosis” and has no definite plans for future performances.[5]
November 20 – The Who open their Quadrophenia US tour with a concert at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, but drummer Keith Moon passes out and has to be carried off the stage. 19-year old fan Scot Halpin is selected from the audience to finish the show.
December 3 – CBGB music club opens in Manhattan.
December 15 – Jermaine Jackson marries Hazel Gordy, daughter of Motown Records executive Barry Gordy.
December 25 – Universal Pictures releases The Sting, reviving interest in the ragtime music of Scott Joplin.
December 31
Brothers Malcolm and Angus Young perform under the name AC/DC at the former Sydney nightclub ‘Chequers’ for their New Year’s Eve party.
The second annual New Year’s Rockin’ Eve airs on NBC, with performances by Tower of Power, Billy Preston and The Pointer Sisters.
(Source: Wikipedia)

 

Time Sweep with Dominic Forbes 12pm ET @softrockjock

July 6, 2013
Editor In Chief

time-fliesThis Week on Time Sweep

TUNES ABOUT

  • Fishing
  • High Fashion
  • Time

ADDITIONAL FEATURES

 

Artist Countdown: Ringo Starr Top 20 Hits 1pm ET @RadioMax @ringostarrmusic

July 5, 2013
Editor In Chief

RingoStarrRingo Starr, MBE (born Richard Starkey; 7 July 1940) is an English musician, singer and actor who gained worldwide fame as the drummer for the Beatles. He sang lead vocals on several of their songs, including “With a Little Help from My Friends“, “Yellow Submarine” and their version of “Act Naturally“. He is also credited as a co-writer of “What Goes On”, “Flying” and “Dig It”, and as the sole author of “Don’t Pass Me By” and “Octopus’s Garden“.

He was twice afflicted by life-threatening illnesses during his childhood, and as a result of prolonged hospitalisations, fell behind scholastically: his classmates nicknamed him “Lazarus” after a twelve-month recovery from peritonitis following a routine appendectomy. At age eight, he had remained illiterate. After several years of twice weekly tutoring he had nearly caught up to his peers academically, but in 1953, he contracted tuberculosis and was admitted to a sanatorium, where he remained for two years. He then entered the workforce and briefly held a position with British Rail before securing an apprenticeship at a Liverpool equipment manufacturer. Soon after, he became interested in the UK skiffle craze, developing a fervent admiration for the genre. In 1957, he cofounded his first band, the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group, and they had earned several prestigious local bookings before the fad succumbed to American rock and roll by early 1958.

When the Beatles formed in 1960, Starr was a member of another leading Liverpool group, Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. After achieving moderate success with them in the UK and Hamburg, Germany, he quit the Hurricanes and joined the Beatles in August 1962, replacing Pete Best. Starr’s creative contribution to their music has received praise from drummers such as Steve Smith and Phil Collins. In 2011, Rolling Stone readers named him the fifth-greatest drummer of all-time.

A critically acclaimed actor, Starr played key roles in the Beatles’ films and appeared in numerous others. After their break-up in 1970, he released several successful singles and albums and recorded with each of the former Beatles. He has been featured in a number of documentaries, hosted television shows, narrated the first two seasons of the children’s television series Thomas the Tank Engine & Friends and portrayed “Mr Conductor” during the first season of the PBS children’s television series Shining Time Station. Since 1989, Starr has toured with twelve variations of Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band. (Source: Wikipedia)

1 Photograph
2 It Don’t Come Easy
3 You’re Sixteen
4 Back Off Boogaloo
5 Only You (And You Alone)
6 Oh My My
7 A Dose of Rock ‘n’ Roll
8 No No Song
9 It’s All Down to Goodnight Vienna
10 Wrack My Brain
11 Weight of the World
12 Beaucoups of Blues
13 Act Naturally (with Buck Owen)
14 Hey! Baby
15 You Don’t Know Me At All
16 La De Da
17 Liverpool 8
18 Snookeroo
19 Wings
20 Drowning in the Sea of Love

RadioMax Feature Year: 1976 3pm ET @radiomax

June 2, 2013
Editor In Chief

1976January 5 – Former Beatles road manager Mal Evans is shot dead by Los Angeles police after refusing to drop what police only later determine is an air rifle.

January 7 – Kenneth Moss, a former record company executive, is sentenced to 120 days in the Los Angeles County Jail and four years probation for involuntary manslaughter in the 1974 drug-induced death of Average White Band drummer Robbie McIntosh.

January 13 – A trial begins for seven Brunswick Records and Dakar Records employees. The record company employees are charged with stealing more than $184,000 in royalties from artists.

January 19 – Concert promoter Bill Sargent makes an offer of $30 million to the Beatles if they will reunite for a concert.

February 15 – Bette Midler bails seven members of her entourage out of jail after they are arrested on charges of cocaine and marijuana possession.

February 19 – Former Tower of Power lead singer Rick Stevens is arrested and charged with the drug-related murders of three men in San Jose, California.

February 20 – Kiss have their footprints added to the sidewalk outside Hollywood’s Grauman’s Chinese Theater.

February 24 – Having been released one week before, The Eagles’ Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) compilation becomes the first album in history to be certified platinum by the RIAA. The new platinum certification represents sales of at least 1 million copies for albums and 2 million copies for singles.

March 4 – ABBA arrive at Sydney airport for a promotional tour in Australia.

March 6 – EMI Records reissues all 22 previously released British Beatles singles, plus a new single of the classic “Yesterday”. All 23 singles hit the UK charts at the same time.

March 7 – A wax likeness of Elton John is put on display in London’s Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum.

March 9 – The Who’s Keith Moon collapses onstage ten minutes into a performance at the Boston Garden.

March 15 – Members of The Plastic People of the Universe are arrested in communist Czechoslovakia. They were sentenced from 8 to 18 months in jail.

March 20 – Alice Cooper marries Sheryl Goddard in an Acapulco restaurant.

March 25 – Jackson Browne’s wife Phyllis commits suicide.

March 26 – In Paris, France, Wings guitarist Jimmy McCulloch breaks one of his fingers when he slips in his hotel bathroom following the final performance on the band’s European tour. The injury ended up delaying the band’s United States tour by three weeks.

April 3 – British pop group Brotherhood of Man win the 21st Eurovision Song Contest in The Hague, Netherlands, with the song “Save Your Kisses For Me”. It goes on to be the biggest selling Eurovision winner ever.

April 14 – Stevie Wonder announces that he has signed a “$13 million-plus” contract with Motown Records.

April 24 – Saturday Night Live producer Lorne Michaels makes a semi-serious on-air offer to pay the Beatles $3000 to reunite live on the show. In a 1980 interview, John Lennon stated that he and Paul McCartney happened to be watching the show together at Lennon’s apartment in New York and considered walking down to the SNL studio “for a gag” but were “too tired”.[1] On May 22, Michaels raises his offer from $3000 to $3,200.

April 28 – The Rolling Stones open their European tour in Frankfurt, Germany.

April 29 – When his tour stops in Memphis, Tennessee, Bruce Springsteen jumps the wall at Elvis Presley’s mansion, “Graceland”, in an attempt to see his idol. Security guards stop Springsteen and escort him off the grounds.

May 3
Paul McCartney and Wings start their Wings over America Tour in Fort Worth, Texas. This is the first time McCartney has performed in the US since The Beatles’ last concert in 1966 at Candlestick Park. Paul Simon puts together a benefit show at Madison Square Garden to raise money for the New York Public Library. Phoebe Snow, Jimmy Cliff and the Brecker Brothers also perform. The concert brings in over $30,000 for the Library.

May 19
Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards is involved in a car accident northwest of London. Cocaine is found in his wrecked car. Richards is given a court date of January 12, 1977. Rumour spread by German press: ABBA members killed in plane crash, only Anni-Frid survived.

May 25 – Bob Dylan’s Rolling Thunder Revue tour ends.

June – Former Spring Canyon keyboardist Mark Cook joins Daniel Amos.

June 6 – Keith Richards and Anita Pallenberg suffer tragedy when their 10-week old son Tara dies of respiratory failure.

June 10 – Alice Cooper collapses and is rushed to UCLA Hospital in Los Angeles, three weeks before the Goes To Hell tour would begin. The tour is cancelled.

June 18 – ABBA perform “Dancing Queen” for the first time on Swedish television in Stockholm on the eve of the wedding of King Carl XVI Gustaf to Silvia Sommerlath.

June 25 – Uriah Heep performs its last show with David Byron as lead singer in Bilbao, Spain. Byron is sacked shortly afterward.

July 2 – Composer Benjamin Britten accepts a life peerage, only a few months before his death. Brian Wilson performs on stage with The Beach Boys for the first time in three years at a Day on the Green concert in Oakland, California.

July 4 – Many outdoor festivals and shows are held all over the United States as the country celebrates its bicentennial. Elton John performs for 62,000 at Shaffer Stadium in Foxboro, Massachusetts, while The Eagles and Fleetwood Mac play for 36,000 at Tampa Stadium, and Lynyrd Skynyrd and ZZ Top draw 35,000 at Memphis Memorial Stadium.

July 7 – 50,000 fans brave the rain in New York to attend a free Jefferson Starship concert in Central Park.

July 27 – Tina Turner files for divorce from husband Ike.

August 5 – Eric Clapton provokes an uproar over comments he makes on stage at a Birmingham concert, voicing his opposition to immigration using multiple racial slurs while exhorting the audience to support Enoch Powell and to “keep Britain white”.

August 11 – Keith Moon is rushed to hospital for the second time in five months, collapsing after trashing his Miami hotel room.

August 13 – The official ABBA logo with the reversed ‘B’ is adopted.

August 16 – Cliff Richard becomes one of the first Western artists ever to perform in the Soviet Union when he gives a concert in Leningrad.

August 21 – An estimated 120,000 fans pack Knebworth House to see The Rolling Stones. Todd Rundgren, Lynyrd Skynyrd and 10cc also perform.

August 31 – a U.S. district court decision rules that George Harrison had “subconsciously” copied The Chiffons’ hit “He’s So Fine” when he wrote the song “My Sweet Lord”.

September 1 – Ode Records president Lou Adler is kidnapped at his Malibu home and released eight hours later after a $25,000 ransom is paid. Two suspects are soon arrested.

September 3 – Rory Gallagher joins the short list of Western popular musicians to perform behind the Iron Curtain with a show in Warsaw, Poland.

September 8 – In a candid interview appearing in the October 7 edition of Rolling Stone published today, Elton John publicly discloses his bisexuality for the first time.

September 14 – The one-hour Bob Dylan concert special Hard Rain airs on NBC, coinciding with the release of the live album of the same name.

September 18 – Queen performs a massive free concert at London’s Hyde Park for over 150,000 people. The second annual Rock Music Awards air on CBS. Peter Frampton wins Rock Personality of the Year, while Fleetwood Mac wins for Best Group and Best Album.

September 20 & September 21 – 100 Club Punk Festival, the first international punk festival is held in London. Siouxsie and the Banshees play their first concert.

September 25 – Bono, The Edge, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen, Jr form a band called Feedback in Dublin. The band would later be renamed U2.

October 2 – Joe Cocker performs a duet of “Feelin’ Alright” with himself (as portrayed by John Belushi) on Saturday Night Live.

October 8 – English punk rock group the Sex Pistols sign a contract with EMI Records.

October 11 – Irish singer Joe Dolan is banned for life by Aer Lingus after an air rage incident en route to Corfu from Dublin.

October 20 – The Led Zeppelin concert film The Song Remains the Same premieres at Cinema I in New York.

October 31 – George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic begin “The P-Funk/Rubber Band Earth Tour” in Houston, a national live series highlighting one of the biggest and revolutionary stage shows in the history of the music industry (the rock group Kiss would be the other group to do a similar act), relying on elaborate costumes, special lighting and effects, and extremely large props including “the Mothership”, which would arrive and land on stage, all of what this band is generally known for. This live set would vary in length (on average of 3 to 5 hours long) and at high volume.

November 18 – Former Tower of Power lead singer Rick Stevens and another person are found guilty on two counts of murder.

November 23 – Thin Lizzy are forced to cancel their U.S. tour when guitarist Brian Robertson injures his hand in a bar fight. Jerry Lee Lewis is arrested after showing up drunk outside Graceland at 3 a.m., waving a pistol and loudly demanding to see Elvis Presley. Presley denied his request.

November 25 – The Band gives its last public performance; Martin Scorsese is on hand to film it.

November 26 – The Sex Pistols’ debut single “Anarchy in the U.K.” is released by EMI.

December 1 – In the UK, the Sex Pistols cause a national outcry after swearing on Thames Television’s Today show.

December 2 – The Bee Gees perform at Madison Square Garden and donate the proceeds to the Police Athletic League in New York. In January 1979, they will receive the Police Athletic League’s “Superstars of the Year” award.

December 3 – A Pink Floyd album cover shoot in South London goes awry when a large inflatable pig balloon being used for the shoot breaks free of its moorings and drifts out of sight. Bob Marley and several others are injured when gunmen burst into his home in Kingston, Jamaica and open fire.

December 8 – The Carpenters air their “Very First Television Special” on ABC. The Eagles release Hotel California.

December 12 – Ace Frehley is shocked on stage during a Kiss concert in Lakeland, Florida after touching an ungrounded metal railing. The incident inspires the song “Shock Me”.

December 31 – The fifth annual New Year’s Rockin’ Eve special airs on ABC, with performances by Donna Summer, Bachman-Turner Overdrive, The Four Seasons, and KC and the Sunshine Band.

 

Feature Year: 1970 4pm ET

May 19, 2013
Editor In Chief

1970Music News for 1970


January 3 – Former Pink Floyd frontman Syd Barrett releases his first solo album The Madcap Laughs.

January 4 – The Who drummer Keith Moon fatally runs over his chauffer with his Bentley trying to escape a mob outside a pub. The death is later ruled an accident.

January 7 – Max Yasgur, owner of the New York farm where the 1969 Woodstock Festival was held, is sued for $35,000 in property damages by neighboring farmers.

January 14 – Diana Ross and the Supremes perform for the last time together at the Frontier Hotel in Las Vegas.

January 16 – John Lennon’s London art gallery exhibit of lithographs, Bag One, is shut down by Scotland Yard for displaying “erotic lithographs”

January 24 – James Shep Sheppard, of The Heartbeats and Shep and the Limelites, is found murdered in his car on the Long Island Expressway

January 26 – Simon & Garfunkel release their final album together, Bridge Over Troubled Water. The title track and album stay #1 on the Billboard charts for six weeks and go on to win a record six Grammys at the 13th Grammy Awards, including “Record of the Year”, “Song of the Year”, and “Album of the Year.” In Britain it tops the album chart at regular intervals over the next two years, and becomes the best-selling album in Britain during the 1970s.

January 27 – Miles Davis makes the final recordings for his experimental album Circle in the Round, featuring sitar and tabla.

January 28 – The newly formed Band of Gypsies breaks up when guitarist Jimi Hendrix walks out after playing just two songs, telling the audience “I’m sorry we just can’t get it together”.

February 11 – The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr, is premiered in New York City. The film’s soundtrack album, including Badfinger’s “Come and Get It” (written and produced by Paul McCartney), is released on Apple Records.

February 13 – Black Sabbath release their self titled debut album in England.

February 14 – The Who records Live At Leeds in Yorkshire, England. The Grateful Dead plays an equally historic concert on the same date at the Fillmore East, New York City.

February 17 – Joni Mitchell announces that she is retiring from live performances, following her show at London’s Royal Albert Hall. She would be back performing concerts within a year.

February 23 – Ringo Starr appears on the television show Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In.

February 27 – Jefferson Airplane is fined $1,000 for using profanity during a concert in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

February 28 – Led Zeppelin perform in Copenhagen under the pseudonym The Nobs, to avoid a threatened lawsuit by Count Eva von Zeppelin, descendant of airship designer Ferdinand von Zeppelin.

March 4 – Janis Joplin is fined $200 for using obscene language during a concert performance in Tampa, Florida.

March 6 – Cult leader and suspected murderer Charles Manson releases an album titled Lie: The Love and Terror Cult to help finance his defense.

March 15 – West German pavilion at Expo ’70 in Osaka features 5½ hours’ daily live performances of the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen (to September 13).

March 19 – David Bowie marries model Angela Barnett.

March 21 – In Amsterdam, Dana wins the 15th annual Eurovision Song Contest for Ireland with the song “All Kinds of Everything”. She is elected to the European Parliament some 29 years later.

March 25 – José José gives a masterful performance of the song “El Triste” at the “Latin Song Festival II”, predecessor of the OTI Festival.

March 26 – Peter Yarrow (of Peter, Paul and Mary) pleads guilty to “taking immoral liberties” with a 14 year old girl in Washington, D.C., on August 31, 1969

April 2 – The London Magistrate’s Court hears arguments on John Lennon’s indecency summons for his exhibition of erotic lithographs during his art exhibit on January 16.

April 3 – Minneapolis nightclub the Depot opens, eventually renamed to First Avenue.

April 10 – Paul McCartney publicly announces the break-up of The Beatles.

April 14 – Michael Nesmith announces he has left The Monkees

April 17 – Johnny Cash performs at the White House at the invitation of President Richard M. Nixon.

April 20 – Paul McCartney’s first solo album, McCartney, is released.

April 24 – Grace Slick of Jefferson Airplane is invited to a tea party at the White House by Tricia Nixon, daughter of U.S. President Richard Nixon. Slick arrives at the party with Abbie Hoffman, who is on trial for conspiring to riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The pair planned to spike Nixon’s tea cup with a heavy dose of LSD. Slick is recognized (although Hoffman is not) and told to leave because she is on the FBI list.

May 4 – Charles Wuorinen, 32, becomes the youngest composer ever to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music.

May 8 – The Beatles’ last LP, Let It Be, is released.

May 16 – Randy Bachman leaves The Guess Who to start up Bachman–Turner Overdrive.

May 20 – The Beatles’ film Let It Be premières in London and Liverpool. None of the four band members are in attendance at either screening.

May 23 – 24 – Grateful Dead make their first British appearance at Hollywood Festival, Newcastle-under-Lyme, on a bill also featuring Black Sabbath, Free, and Jose Feliciano. Everyone is completely upstaged by the previously unknown Mungo Jerry, whose debut single “In the Summertime” becomes the best-selling hit of the year.

June 13 – “The Long and Winding Road” becomes the Beatles’ last U.S. Number 1 song, though it is never released as a single in Britain.

The Stooges play at the Cincinnati Pop Festival.

July 4 – The music countdown show American Top 40 debuts.


July 17 – The Guess Who perform at the White House for President Nixon and his guest The Prince of Wales. At Pat Nixon’s request, they do not play their breakthrough hit “American Woman” due to the song’s supposed anti-American lyrics.


July 26 – Guitarist Jimi Hendrix plays at his hometown of Seattle at Sicks Stadium where, under the influence of drugs, he starts verbally abusing members of the audience.


August 3 – Janis Joplin makes her final TV appearance, on the Dick Cavett Show.


August 26 – August 30 – The Isle of Wight Festival 1970 takes place on East Afton Farm off the coast of England. Some 600,000 people attend the largest rock festival of all time. Artists include Jimi Hendrix, The Who, The Doors, Chicago, Richie Havens, John Sebastian, Joan Baez, Ten Years After, Emerson, Lake & Palmer and Jethro Tull.


August 30 – The Rolling Stones open their European tour in Malmö, Sweden.


September 6 – During his final European tour, guitarist Jimi Hendrix is greeted by booing and jeering by German fans as a result of his late appearance on stage and incoherent stage performance. Bassist Billy Cox quits the tour and returns to the United States.

September 17 – Jimi Hendrix makes his last appearance, with Eric Burdon & War jamming at Ronnie Scotts Club in London. Hendrix, aged 27, dies the following day from a barbiturate overdose at his London hotel.

October 4 – Janis Joplin is found dead in her bedroom. She died from a heroin overdose, at the age of 27.


October 10 – Newly-independent Fiji adopts God Bless Fiji as its national anthem.


October 30 – Jim Morrison of The Doors, found guilty of indecent exposure and profanity because of his behavior during a March 1, 1969 concert, is sentenced to eight months of hard labor and a $500 fine.


November 23 – The Electric Factory concert venue in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania’ closes its doors.

December 8 – John Lennon conducts a lengthy and intensely candid interview with Jann Wenner of Rolling Stone magazine. He discusses his new solo album and the influence of primal therapy on its creation, as well as his personal traumas dating back to childhood. He also makes many revelations about his time in The Beatles, including his account of the group’s breakup.

Dalida, still unable to cut a UK record deal, leaves Barclay Records for Orlando Records.

Derek Bailey and Evan Parker found Incus Records, specialising in releasing free improvised music and said to be the first independent artist-owned record label.

Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew is widely considered the first successful full-fledged fusion of rock and roll and jazz, as well as being one Davis’s best-known albums.

 

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