Tag: 1975

Wednesday 3pm ET: RadioMaxMusic Feature Year 1975

MUSIC NEWS 1975
January 2 – New York City U.S. District Court Judge Richard Owen rules that former Beatle John Lennon and his lawyers can have access to Department of Immigration files pertaining to his deportation case.

January 5 – The Wiz, a new musical version of the classic Wizard of Oz story, opens at Broadway’s Majestic Theater in New York City.
January 6 – Approximately 1000 Led Zeppelin fans, waiting for tickets to go on sale for Led Zeppelin’s February 4 concert, cause an estimated $30,000 in damage to the lobby of the Boston Garden. The fans reportedly broke chairs and doors and caused other damage to the building. Boston Mayor Kevin White cancels the upcoming show.
January 8 – Three Led Zeppelin concerts at Madison Square Garden sell out in a record four hours.
January 12 – “The Warner Brothers Music Show” begins a nine city, 18 show tour of Europe. The tour included Warner Brothers acts Little Feat, Tower of Power, the Doobie Brothers, Bonaroo, Montrose, and Graham Central Station.
January 24 – Jazz pianist Keith Jarrett plays the solo improvisation ‘The Köln Concert’ at the Cologne Opera, which, recorded live, becomes the best-selling piano recording in history.
February 13 – The film Slade In Flame, starring the members of Slade, premieres at the Metropole Theatre in London.
February 21 – John Lennon releases his Rock ‘n’ Roll LP, featuring his favorite rock songs from the 1950s. To promote the album he conducts a telephone interview with 20 rock radio stations simultaneously.
March 1 – Jeff Beck releases the album Blow by Blow. It is the first album to be released using just his name.
March 2 – Los Angeles Police make a routine traffic stop that turns out to be Paul McCartney and his wife Linda. Linda is arrested for having 170 to 225 grams (six to eight ounces) of marijuana in her pocketbook.
March 21 – Alice Cooper, now a solo artist, begins the Welcome to My Nightmare tour in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The elaborate show is among the largest stage spectacles of the decade.
March 22 – In the Eurovision Song Contest in Stockholm, Sweden, the Dutch group Teach-In wins with the song “Ding-A-Dong”.
March 23 – Promoter Bill Graham stages the S.N.A.C.K. (Students Need Athletics, Culture and Kicks) charity concert at Kezar Stadium in San Francisco, California, to benefit the city’s educational system. Almost 60,000 people come to see The Grateful Dead, The Doobie Brothers, Santana, Jefferson Starship, Tower of Power, Eddie Palmieri, Joan Baez, Graham Central Station and Neil Young joined by members of The Band along with a surprise appearance by Bob Dylan. It’s the largest benefit concert in history to date.
March 26 – The film version of The Who’s Tommy premieres in London.
April 3 – Steve Miller is arrested and charged with setting fire to the clothes and personal effects of a friend, Benita DiOrio, and resisting arrest. DiOrio drops the charges the following day.
April 7 – Ritchie Blackmore plays a final show with Deep Purple in Paris before quitting to form his own group, Rainbow.
April 17 – Cambodian singer-songwriter Sinn Sisamouth and his pregnant wife are among millions forced out of Phnom Penh by the Khmer Rouge.
April 18 – Alice Cooper’s first television special, Welcome to My Nightmare: The Making of a Record Album airs.
April 24 – Pete Ham, founder of the group Badfinger, is found hanged in his London garage. His death is ruled a suicide.
April 28 – Tom Snyder interviews John Lennon on the Tomorrow Show.

Saturday 12am ET: Feature LP: Eagles – One of These Nights (1975)

One of These Nights is the fourth studio album by the Eagles, released June 10, 1975. The record would become the Eagles’ first number one album on Billboard’s album chart in July that year, and yielded three Top 10 singles, “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes” and “Take It to the Limit”. Its title song is the group’s second number one single on the Billboard Hot 100. The album sold four million copies and was nominated for Grammy Album of the Year. A single from the album, “Lyin’ Eyes”, was also nominated for Record of the Year, and won the Eagles’ first Grammy for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

One of These Nights is the last Eagles album to feature guitarist Bernie Leadon, who left the band after the One Of These Nights tour and was replaced by Joe Walsh. The seventh track, “Visions”, is the only Eagles song on which lead guitarist Don Felder sang the lead vocals, despite his desire to write and sing more songs. The album was the band’s commercial breakthrough, transforming them into international superstars. They went on a worldwide tour to promote the album.

1. “One of These Nights” 4:51
2. “Too Many Hands” 4:43
3. “Hollywood Waltz” 4:04
4. “Journey of the Sorcerer” 6:40
5. “Lyin’ Eyes” 6:22
6. “Take It to the Limit” 4:49
7. “Visions” 3:58
8. “After the Thrill is Gone” 3:56
9. “I Wish You Peace” 3:45

Thursday 6pm ET: Classic Countdown with Ron Kovacs

This week we count down the Top 40 Hits from October 11, 1975.

Wednesday 10pm: Top 100 Albums of The 70’s – #97 – Bob Dylan – Blood On The Tracks (1975)

Top 100 Albums of the 70’s

#97 – Bob Dylan – Blood On The Tracks (1975)

Blood on the Tracks is the 15th studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on January 20, 1975 by Columbia Records. The album marked Dylan’s return to Columbia Records after a two-album stint with Asylum Records. Dylan commenced recording the album in New York City in September 1974. In December, shortly before Columbia was due to release the record, Dylan abruptly re-recorded much of the material in a studio in Minneapolis. The final album contains five tracks from New York and five from Minneapolis.

Blood on the Tracks was initially received with mixed reviews, but has subsequently been acclaimed as one of Dylan’s greatest albums by critics and fans. The songs have been linked to tensions in Dylan’s personal life, including estrangement from his then-wife Sara. One of their children, Jakob Dylan, has described the songs as “my parents talking”. The album has been viewed as an outstanding example of the confessional singer-songwriter’s craft, and it has been called “the truest, most honest account of a love affair from tip to stern ever put down on magnetic tape”. In interviews, Dylan has denied that the songs on the album are autobiographical. In 2003, the album was ranked No. 16 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, and in 2004, it was placed at No. 5 on Pitchfork’s list of the top 100 albums of the 1970s.

The album reached No. 1 on the Billboard 200 charts and No. 4 on the UK Albums Chart. The single “Tangled Up in Blue” peaked at No. 31 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. The album remains one of Dylan’s best-selling studio releases, with a double-platinum U.S. certification by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). In 2015, it was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

1. “Tangled Up in Blue” 5:42
2. “Simple Twist of Fate” 4:19
3. “You’re a Big Girl Now” 4:36
4. “Idiot Wind” 7:48
5. “You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go” 2:55

1. “Meet Me in the Morning” 4:22
2. “Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts” 8:51
3. “If You See Her, Say Hello” 4:49
4. “Shelter from the Storm” 5:02
5. “Buckets of Rain” 3:22

RADIOMAX2: Monday 9am – Top 50 Albums of 1975 with Ron Kovacs

The top Albums of 1975 on the Top 50 Countdown with Ron Kovacs

Listen now on RadioMaxMusic 2 – Classic Countdown Channel

http://radiomaxmusic.com/classicpopup.html

 

Friday 6pm: History of Rock and Roll with Bill Drake

This installment features the years 1968 through 1975.

Satrurday 3pm: Max 20th Century – 1975 Part XI

Saturday 3pm: MaxMusic 20th Century – 1975 (Part III)

Monday 6pm: Max 20th Century – 1975 (Part 1)

January 2 – New York City U.S. District Court Judge Richard Owen rules that former Beatle John Lennon and his lawyers can have access to Department of Immigration files pertaining to his deportation case.
January 5 – The Wiz, a new musical version of the classic Wizard of Oz story, opens at Broadway’s Majestic Theater in New York City.
January 6 – Approximately 1000 Led Zeppelin fans, waiting for tickets to go on sale for Led Zeppelin’s February 4 concert, cause an estimated $30,000 in damage to the lobby of the Boston Garden. The fans reportedly broke chairs and doors and caused other damage to the building. Boston Mayor Kevin White cancels the upcoming show.
January 8 – Three Led Zeppelin concerts at Madison Square Garden sell out in a record four hours.
January 12 – “The Warner Brothers Music Show” begins a nine city, 18 show tour of Europe. The tour included Warner Brothers acts Little Feat, Tower of Power, the Doobie Brothers, Bonaroo, Montrose, and Graham Central Station.
January 24 – Jazz pianist Keith Jarrett plays the solo improvisation ‘The Köln Concert’ at the Cologne Opera, which, recorded live, becomes the best-selling piano recording in history.
February 13 – The film Slade In Flame, starring the members of Slade, premieres at the Metropole Theatre in London.
February 21 – John Lennon releases his Rock ‘n’ Roll LP, featuring his favorite rock songs from the 1950s. To promote the album he conducts a telephone interview with 20 rock radio stations simultaneously.
March 1 – Jeff Beck releases the album Blow by Blow. It is the first album to be released using just his name.
March 2 – Los Angeles Police make a routine traffic stop that turns out to be Paul McCartney and his wife Linda. Linda is arrested for having 170 to 225 grams (six to eight ounces) of marijuana in her pocketbook.
March 21 – Alice Cooper, now a solo artist, begins the Welcome to My Nightmare tour in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The elaborate show is among the largest stage spectacles of the decade.
March 22 – In the Eurovision Song Contest in Stockholm, Sweden, the Dutch group Teach-In wins with the song “Ding-A-Dong”.
March 23 – Promoter Bill Graham stages the S.N.A.C.K. (Students Need Athletics, Culture and Kicks) charity concert at Kezar Stadium in San Francisco, California, to benefit the city’s educational system. Almost 60,000 people come to see The Grateful Dead, The Doobie Brothers, Santana, Jefferson Starship, Tower of Power, Eddie Palmieri, Joan Baez, Graham Central Station and Neil Young joined by members of The Band along with a surprise appearance by Bob Dylan. It’s the largest benefit concert in history to date.
March 26 – The film version of The Who’s Tommy premieres in London.
April 3 – Steve Miller is arrested and charged with setting fire to the clothes and personal effects of a friend, Benita DiOrio, and resisting arrest. DiOrio drops the charges the following day.
April 7 – Ritchie Blackmore plays a final show with Deep Purple in Paris before quitting to form his own group, Rainbow.
April 17 – Cambodian singer-songwriter Sinn Sisamouth and his pregnant wife are among millions forced out of Phnom Penh by the Khmer Rouge.
April 18 – Alice Cooper’s first television special, Welcome to My Nightmare: The Making of a Record Album airs.
April 24 – Pete Ham, founder of the group Badfinger, is found hanged in his London garage. His death is ruled a suicide.
April 28 – Tom Snyder interviews John Lennon on the Tomorrow Show.

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

This installment of the LP Lounge feature two CD4 (Quad) LP’s from the Doobie Brothers.

What Were Once Vices Are Now Habits is the fourth studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers. The album was released on February 1, 1974, by Warner Bros. Records.

Tom Johnston’s “Another Park, Another Sunday” was chosen to be the album’s first single. “It’s about losing a girl,” stated Johnston. “I wrote the chords and played it on acoustic, and then Ted Templeman had some ideas for it, like running the guitars through Leslie speakers.” The song did moderately well on the charts, peaking at #32.

The second single released was “Eyes of Silver”, another Johnston penned tune. According to him, “Wordwise, that one really isn’t that spectacular. I wrote them at the last minute.” That song didn’t have much success on the charts either. Grasping for chart action, Warner Brothers re-released the band’s first single, “Nobody”. This release was soon overshadowed when radio stations discovered “Black Water”. Other stations joined in and the song was officially released as a single that went on to sell over a million copies and became the Doobie Brothers’ first #1 hit. “Black Water” had been featured as the B-side of “Another Park, Another Sunday” eight months earlier.

Stampede is the fifth studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers. The album was released on April 25, 1975, by Warner Bros. Records. It was the final album by the band before Michael McDonald replaced Tom Johnston as lead vocalist and primary songwriter. The album has been certified gold by the RIAA.

Stampede showed the band diversifying elements of their sound more than ever before, combining elements of their old sound as well as country-rock, funk and folk music. Many guest musicians contributed on the album including Maria Muldaur, Ry Cooder and Curtis Mayfield.

The first and most successful single released from this album was “Take Me in Your Arms (Rock Me a Little While)” on April 23, 1975, a classic Motown tune written by the legendary songwriting trio of Holland-Dozier-Holland. Tom Johnston had wanted to record the song for several years. “I thought that would be a killer track to cover,” he said. “It’s probably one of my favorite songs of all time. I thought our version came out great.”

The next single, released on July 8, 1975, was “Sweet Maxine” which was more akin to the Doobie Brothers’ earlier hits style-wise. “Pat wrote the music to this and I wrote the words, ” Johnston recalled. “And Billy Payne had a lot to do with the sound of the song, because of his incredible keyboard playing.” The track stalled at #40 on the Billboard charts.

The third and final single was Patrick Simmons’ “I Cheat the Hangman”, released November 12, 1975. It is a somber outlaw ballad that was inspired by the story An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge by Ambrose Bierce. “It’s about a ghost returning to his home after the Civil War and not realizing he’s dead,” said Simmons about the song. The album version of the song is a progressive rock-style composition ending in a twisted collage of strings, horns and synthesizers made to sound like ghostly wails. “We’d cut the track, and we kicked around how to develop the ending-I thought about synthesizers and guitar solos. Ted [Templeman] got to thinking about it, and he ran it past [arranger] Nick DeCaro for some orchestration ideas. ‘Night on Bald Mountain’ by Mussorgsky really inspired the wildness of the strings, and Nick came up with the chorale thing at the end.” The ambitious “I Cheat the Hangman” only managed to reach #60 on the music charts.

“Neal’s Fandango” was inspired by the Santa Cruz mountains and was an homage to Neal Cassady, Merry Prankster bus driver and former Jack Kerouac sidekick in On The Road. It was occasionally played on San Francisco Bay Area classic rock station KFOX “K-FOX” (that means KUFX) because of the Doobie Brothers’ South Bay roots. – Wikipedia

Saturday 10am: Saturday Live with Ron Kovacs

This week we feature the Top 40 Hits from February 15, 1975.  Join Ron Kovacs Live on RadioMaxMusic.

Saturday 10am: Classic Countdown with Ron Kovacs

This edition of Saturday Live features a RadioMax Classic Countdown with the Top 40 Hits from January 4, 1975.  Join Ron Kovacs Live at 10am ET on RadioMaxMusic.

Saturday 10am: RadioMax Classic Countdown with Ron Kovacs

This week we travel back to 1975 and feature the Top 40 hits from November 22.  Join Ron Kovacs Live 10am on RadioMaxMusic.

Saturday 10am: Classic Countdown with Ron Kovacs

This week we feature the Top 40 Hits from October 11, 1975.  Join Ron Kovacs Live at 10am ET on RadioMaxMusic.

Monday 9pm: Feature LP: Bob Dylan – Blood On The Tracks (1975) @bobdylantheband

Bob_Dylan_-_Blood_on_the_TracksBlood on the Tracks is the fifteenth studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released in January 1975 on Columbia Records. The album marked Dylan’s return to Columbia after a two-album stint with Asylum Records. Most of the lyrics on the album revolve around heartache, anger, and loneliness.

The album, which followed on the resurgence of critical acclaim for Dylan’s work after Planet Waves, was greeted enthusiastically by fans and critics. In the years following its release it has come to be regarded as one of his best albums; it is common for subsequent records to be labeled his “best since Blood on the Tracks.”. It is also commonly seen as a standard for confessional singer-songwriter albums; though Dylan has denied that the songs are autobiographical, his son Jakob Dylan has stated: “The songs are my parents talking. In 2003, the album was ranked number 16 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, and in 2004, it was placed at number 5 on Pitchfork Media’s list of the top 100 albums of the 1970s.

The album reached #1 on the Billboard 200 charts and #4 on the UK Albums Chart. The single “Tangled Up in Blue” peaked at #31 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. The album remains one of Dylan’s best-selling studio releases, with a double-platinum US certification by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) (Wikipedia)

All songs written and composed by Bob Dylan.

1. “Tangled Up in Blue” 5:42
2. “Simple Twist of Fate” 4:19
3. “You’re a Big Girl Now” 4:36
4. “Idiot Wind” 7:48
5. “You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go” 2:55
6. “Meet Me in the Morning” Sep 4:22
7. “Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts” 8:51
8. “If You See Her, Say Hello” 4:49
9. “Shelter from the Storm” 5:02
10. “Buckets of Rain” 3:22