Monday 10pm / Wednesday 12pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

2 classic albums – complete – tonight at 10pm (US East Coast Time) on The LP Lounge – right off the original vinyl, with mixes you can only hear – if you have these LPs (or listen to this show) – Mixed for quadraphonic sound, for people with 4 ears – Santana’s Abraxas and Steely Dan’s Can’t Buy A Thrill…on RadioMaxMusic.com (and the TuneIn app)…

Can’t Buy a Thrill is the debut studio album by the American rock band Steely Dan, released in November 1972 by ABC Records. It was produced by Gary Katz and written by band members Donald Fagen and Walter Becker. The album was recorded at The Village Recorder in Los Angeles.

Abraxas is the second studio album by Latin rock band Santana, released in September 1970.

 

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

This week we focus on 2 albums by 2 sets of duets – (2 x 2 = quad) – both LPs we feature today were released on LP, and LP only – in SQ quadraphonic sound, and to this day, the only way to hear these specific mixes is by locating a copy of the gold bordered LPs.

Now I’ve been given a bit of flac (or wav in some cases) for taking that position, as some of the LPs, notably last week’s Angel Clair and this week’s Loggins and Messina have been reissued in quad, using the original 4 channel masters from the 70s. But those 4 channel mixes had to be further mixed down for mastering to LP. As a result – you can buy some of these albums in quadraphonic sound -BUT- the only way to hear the final LP mixdown – remains on the original LP release.

Even if you buy the new quad releases from Audio Fidelity or Vocalion – which, BTW, I highly recommend – and opt to play them in stereo – the resulting mix will more closely approximate the original stereo mix, not the SQ.
In order to produce these particular LPs the engineer ran the 4 channel master tapes through an SQ encoder. The result; what was meant for the rear channels, would seem to be centered between the left and right stereo speakers, but 90 degrees out of phase, and 3db lower in volume. Decoding these LPs roughly reversed the process. So to my critics, and I have a few, I stand by my position that the mixes you hear on these broadcasts (of these LPs) can only be had, if you have the actual LP.

Well enough of that, when we get to some of the LPs released in the CD-4 system, I’ll stir up the pot among the quad faithful once again. – Willie B

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight (May 7th) at 10pm (US East Coast time) the LP Lounge will be featuring 2 complete vinyl LPs – the catch – these recordings were mixed for LP release, and are unavailable in any other form. They were part of the #Quadraphonic revolution that came (and went) in the 1970s. Even though 5.1 and other forms of surround sound are fully accepted standards today, both in Movies and recordings; in the 70s it was a niche market. And even though all quadraphonic LPs were playable on just about any regular stereo system, the record companies reverted back to the early days of consumer stereo (when you could buy an album in stereo or mono) – and issued most quad releases in both stereo & quad versions (the quad costing $1 more per LP).

To be fair, most of the reissues, and many of the new albums were mixed for stereo, and had to be remixed for quad. When the CD world opened up, and the old albums became available in the digital domain – it was the original 2 channel stereo masters that were used. As a result – the only way to hear the mixes used on these LPs, is to track down one of the LPs – which we have done for you. Be there tonight on RadioMaxMusic.com!

Monday 10pm: Debut LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight, April 30 at 10pm Eastern time (US) RadioMaxMusic will be presenting the first, (hastily assembled) episode of “The LP Lounge”. A spin-off of my regular show The Vinyl Resting Place. Our plan is to play complete LPs, one side at a time – interrupting the music only as needed to turn the record over.

These will be the actual vinyl LPs, purchased over the counter, at the time of their release. In most cases – the only way to hear the particular versions we offer, is to have those original LPs. You see, while the songs, and even the specific recordings you’ll hear have been re-issued in some digital format – the LPs we are spinning are of the original quadraphonic releases of these albums.

Tonight we serve up The Isley Brothers 3+3 and Billy Joel’s Piano Man. – I think we’ll have time for a bonus track from Mr. Joel as well.

Don’t let that term “Quadraphonic” Put you off – they sound just fine in Stereo, and, if you listen through headphones, you’ll even get some semblance of the surround field.

You can hear us through the pop-up player on the website http://www.radiomaxmusic.com, or via the TuneIn app. There are rumors we are available through Itunes as well.

So why dedicate a show to the LP, especially after discovering that some of my younger associates were unclear as to what the term LP meant? Well, perhaps a bit of a history lesson;

Record companies produced collections of 78 rpm records by one performer or of one type of music in specially assembled albums as early as 1908. Odeon is often said to have pioneered the “album” in 1909 when it released the “Nutcracker Suite” by Tchaikovsky on 4 double-sided discs in a specially-designed package. However, Deutsche Grammophon had produced an album for its complete recording of the opera Carmen in the previous year. By the time the second world war came around these record sets featured their own colorful paper covers and were in both 10-inch and 12-inch sizes, and could include either a collection of related popular songs, either by performer or style, or extended length classical music, including complete operas and symphonies. The result; when the LP came along and included multiple tracks, the name “album” came along too.

Both the microgroove LP 33 1/3 rpm record and the 45 rpm single records are made from vinyl plastic that is flexible and “unbreakable” (in normal use).

In 1930, RCA Victor launched the first commercially available vinyl long-playing record, marketed as “Program Transcription” discs. These revolutionary discs were designed for playback at 33 1/3 rpm and were pressed on a 16″ diameter plastic disc. These were primarily used for Radio – programs of 30 min duration could be stored or distributed for rebroadcast.

Vinyl’s had a lower surface noise level than the commonly used shellac and was not nearly as fragile. Of course some 78 rpm records were pressed in vinyl instead of shellac, particularly the six-minute 12-inch records produced by V-Disc for distribution to US troops in World War II.

Beginning in 1939 Dr. Peter Goldmark and his staff undertook exhaustive efforts to address problems of recording and playing back narrow grooves and developing an inexpensive, reliable consumer playback system. In 1948, the 12-inch Long Play (LP) 33 1/3 rpm microgroove record album was introduced by the Columbia Record Company at a dramatic New York press conference on June 21, 1948. In February 1949, RCA Victor released the first 45 rpm single, 7 inches in diameter, with a large center hole to accommodate an automatic play mechanism on the changer, so a stack of singles would drop down one record at a time automatically after each play.