Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Today on the LP Lounge join Willie B for two Doobie Brothers releases in QUAD.

Toulouse Street is the second studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers. The album was released on July 1, 1972, by Warner Bros. Records. It was their first album with new bassist Tiran Porter and second drummer Michael Hossack to augment existing drummer John Hartman, so it meant that they now had their trademark twin-drummer sound. Toulouse Street is the name of a street in the French Quarter of New Orleans. The cover and inside centerfold photos were taken at a former brothel on Toulouse Street.

The Captain and Me is the third studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers. The album was released on March 2, 1973, by Warner Bros. Records. It features some of their most popular hits including “Long Train Runnin'”, “China Grove” and “Without You”. The album is certified 2x Platinum by the RIAA. The album was originally released in Quadraphonic sound on the CD-4 Quadradisc system and also on Quadraphonic 8-track tape. The album was also released in 2002 remixed into 5.1 multichannel DVD-Audio, and on 14 September 2011, on hybrid stereo-multichannel Super Audio CD by Warner Japan in their Warner Premium Sound series.

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Today on the LP Lounge we feature two Quad LP’s from the 70’s. Join Willie B, 10pm ET on RadioMaxMusic.

Rocks is the fourth studio album by American rock band Aerosmith, released May 3, 1976. AllMusic described Rocks as having “captured Aerosmith at their most raw and rocking.” Rocks was ranked No. 176 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. It has greatly influenced many hard rock and heavy metal artists, including Guns N’ Roses, Metallica, and Nirvana. The album was a commercial success, charting three singles on the Billboard Hot 100, two of which reached the Top 40 (“Back in the Saddle” and “Last Child”). The album was one of the first to ship platinum when it was released, and has since gone quadruple platinum.

Why Dontcha is the first studio album by power trio West, Bruce and Laing. The album features “The Doctor”, which received heavy FM radio airplay upon the album’s release and became a signature song in live performance for the band. Other noteworthy tracks include “Out into the Fields”, which Jack Bruce continued to perform in concert following West, Bruce and Laing’s breakup (and which he re-recorded for his 2001 album Shadows in the Air), and “Love is Worth the Blues”, a song loosely based on the chords and structure of The Rolling Stones’ “Play with Fire”. Why Dontcha was West, Bruce and Laing’s most successful album, reaching No. 26 on the Billboard U.S. album chart. – Wikipedia

Monday 10pm – LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight at 10pm (US East Coast time) its the LP Lounge featuring 2 SQ Classics – and 2 bonus tracks. you know the LPs, so I’ll promote the bonus tracks. As a companion to Machine Head I’m offering up a QS encoded version of Smoke on the Water, as performed live in concert, and to go with the Raiders – in glorious monophonic sound is the original 1959 recording that started it all. Before Don Fardon, before John D Loudermilk – it was Marvin Rainwater and Pale Faced Indian. Check us out!!

RAIDERS – INDIAN RESERVATION
As a promotional gambit, Paul Revere took the unusual step of riding cross-country four times, plugging the song at every market available. His efforts paid off: “Indian Reservation” peaked at No. 1 for one week in July. Paul Revere: “I called the head of Columbia’s promotion and told him I was going on a record promotion trip, which was something artists didn’t do anymore.” “Indian Reservation” became Columbia’s biggest-selling single for almost a decade, clearing over six million units. The success of the single was followed by a Top 20 album (Indian Reservation) and the No. 23 hit “Birds of a Feather”. The Raiders also expanded to include drummer Omar Martinez and keyboardist Bob Wooley.

DEEP PURPLE – MACHINE HEAD
Machine Head is the sixth studio album released by the English rock band Deep Purple. It was recorded through December 1971 in Montreux, Switzerland, and released in March 1972.

Machine Head is often cited as a major influence in the early development of the heavy metal music genre. Commercially, it is Deep Purple’s most successful album, topping the charts in several countries following its release. The album reached number 1 in the United Kingdom and stayed in the top 40 for 20 weeks. It reached number 7 in the United States, remaining on the Billboard 200 for 118 weeks. – Wikipedia

 

 

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight at 10pm (US East Coast Time) we drop the needle on 2 classics at the LP Lounge.

Ten Years After (A Space in Time), and the Supreme’s Greatest Hits.

The first LP will be a direct from the vinyl LP SQ presentation. The Supremes Greatest was only released in quad, in Japan, and only on CD-4. Since I don’t have the where-with-all to play discrete quad – I’ve taken that LP, demodulated it, then encoded it for QS, so you can get some idea what the surround effect was. Still in all, a true vinyl LP, and a mix only possible from that original platter – so I think I’m still keeping it real. You be the judge, check us out at RadioMaxMusic.com

A Space in Time is the sixth studio album by the British blues rock band Ten Years After. It was released in August 1971 by Chrysalis Records in the United Kingdom and Columbia Records in America. A departure in style from their previous albums, A Space in Time is less ‘heavy’ than previous albums and includes more acoustic guitar, perhaps influenced by the success of Led Zeppelin who were mixing acoustic songs with heavier numbers. It reached number 17 in the Billboard 200.

The third track on the album, “I’d Love to Change the World”, is also their biggest hit. By combining a melodic acoustic chorus with challenging electric guitar riffs, they managed to produce a sound that hit number 10 in the charts in Canada and number 40 in the USA. Although this was their biggest hit, they rarely played it live. “Baby Won’t You Let Me Rock ‘n’ Roll You” also charted in the USA, peaking at number 61. – Wikipedia

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Today on the LP Lounge, join Willie B for two classic albums, Redbone and Mountain.

Message from a Drum is the third album by Native American rock band Redbone released in 1971. It was released in Europe under the name The Witch Queen of New Orleans with the same track list and a different cover. The CD version released in the early 2000s has the European cover and title of the original LP and includes the single version of “Chant: 13th Hour” as a bonus track (the full version being from the second LP Potlatch).

 

The Best of Mountain is the first compilation by American hard rock band Mountain. It consists of material recorded throughout 1970-1971, culled from their first three LPs. On April 15, 2003, the album was remastered and reissued in an expanded edition with new liner notes and four bonus tracks, two of which are taken from Leslie West’s first solo album, 1969’s Felix Pappalardi-produced Mountain, the project which eventually led to the formation of the band.

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight we featureĀ in SQ the complete Chicago Album.

Chicago (sometimes referred to as Chicago II) is the second studio album and second double album by Chicago-based American rock band Chicago. This was the first album to use the Chicago logo on the cover, which became an enduring feature on the covers of all of the band’s succeeding studio albums. Released in January 1970 on Columbia Records, Chicago was commercially successful. It was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in April of the same year of its release, and certified platinum in 1991. It reached No. 4 on the album charts in the United States and No. 6 on the album charts in the UK, and produced three top ten singles on the Billboard Hot 100. The album received three Grammy Award nominations – for Album of the Year, Contemporary Vocal Group, and Best Album Cover.

Monday 10pm: LP Lounge with Willie B

Tonight at 10pm (US East Coast time) its SQ vs QS; rock vs folk; white trash vs Stars Hollow’s music teacher – on my little corner of the net! – Willie B

EDGAR WINTER GROUP
They Only Come Out at Night is the third studio album by Edgar Winter and the first by the Edgar Winter Group. A commercial hit, the album reached the #3 slot on the Billboard 200 chart and also features two of the band’s biggest songs: “Frankenstein” (#1 on the Billboard Hot 100) and “Free Ride” (#14 on that same chart). Musically, besides the country track “Round & Round,” the album features a mixture of mostly blues rock and boogie woogie induced rock in a generally carefree and upbeat sound.[citation needed] The album eventually sold two million copies.

In 2006, the album was reissued on Super Audio CD by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab as well as the 2008 Quadraphonic rendition was reissued by SBME Sony BMG (Bertelsmann Music Group) Music Entertainment. In the same year, it was featured in the video game Prey.

Writer Stephen King mentioned the album (specifically its cover artwork) in his 1975 novel ‘Salem’s Lot.

The album is mentioned in the song “I Love My Dad” by Sun Kil Moon on their 2014 album Benji.

The Australian cassette issue of the album in 1973 transposes “Undercover Man” and “Frankenstein” (i.e. Frankenstein ends side A instead of side B) and has a wholly different cover: a photo of the band posing against a black background. The American cassette follows the same track order as the Australian issue, but retains the original cover.

The album was certified gold April 30, 1973 by the RIAA.

Besides being a commercial success, the album has received many highly positive critical reviews. Writing for AllMusic, critic Michael B. Smith praised the “party” and “sing-along” feel of the album. He remarked, “While this album will forever be remembered for spawning the huge hit singles ‘Frankenstein’ and ‘Free Ride,’ there’s plenty more to appreciate on this stellar release.”

CAROLE KING
Music is the third album by American singer-songwriter Carole King. It is a continuation of the style laid down in Tapestry. The album was released in December 1971 and quickly rose to the top of the charts. It features songs such as “It’s Going to Take Some Time” (US No. 12 by The Carpenters), “Sweet Seasons,” a No. 9 hit for Carole King, and “Brother, Brother”.

Carole King: Music experienced immediate success and was certified gold on December 9, 1971, days after release. It was certified platinum on July 17, 1995. The album reportedly sold 1,300,000 copies in the United States on the day of its release.

Music entered the top ten at No. 8, becoming the first of many weeks both Tapestry and Carole King: Music would occupy the top ten simultaneously. The album hit No. 1 on New Year’s Day 1972 and stayed there for three consecutive weeks.

King plays the piano and celeste on many tracks. – Wikipedia