Tuesday 9:20pm: Feature LP: Tom Petty – Southern Accents (1985)

Southern Accents is the sixth album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, released on March 26, 1985, through MCA Records.

The album’s lead single, “Don’t Come Around Here No More”, co-written by Dave Stewart of Eurythmics, peaked at #13 on the Billboard Hot 100. Its music video featured Alice in Wonderland imagery. “Southern Accents” was later covered by Johnny Cash for his Unchained album in 1996, on which members of the Heartbreakers play.

The recording sessions saw some tension between the band members, as each had a different vision for the album. Originally conceived as a concept album, the theme of “Southern Accents” became somewhat murky with the inclusion of three songs co-written by Stewart, and three other songs originally planned for the album left off. Songs cut from the track list include “Trailer”, “Big Boss Man”, “Crackin’ Up”, “The Image of Me” and “The Apartment Song”. These can be found on Playback, a box set released 10 years later that included familiar songs with outtakes, B-sides and other rarities. “Trailer” was released in May 2016 by another band led by Petty, Mudcrutch, on their album 2.

While mixing the opening track “Rebels” Petty became frustrated and punched a wall, severely breaking his left hand. Subsequent surgery on his hand left him with several pins, wires and screws to hold his hand together.

The album cover features an 1865 painting by Winslow Homer titled The Veteran in a New Field.

Click here for album contents from Wikipedia

Tuesday 8:45pm: Feature LP – Tom Petty – Long After Dark (1982)

Long After Dark is the fifth album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, released in November 1982 on Backstreet Records. Notable for the major MTV hit “You Got Lucky”, the album was also the first to feature the late Howie Epstein on bass and harmony vocals. Epstein’s vocals are evident throughout the album, most notably on “Change of Heart”. From this point on Epstein’s vocals became an integral part of the Heartbreakers’ sound.

Two other singles from the album were released, “Change of Heart” and “Straight into Darkness,” with the former joining “You Got Lucky” in the Billboard top 40. “Keeping Me Alive” was one of the outtakes from the sessions for the album. A Petty favorite, “Keeping Me Alive” was eventually released on Petty’s 1995 box set compilation Playback.

Click here for album contents from Wikipedia

Monday 9pm: Feature LP – Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Damn The Torpedoes (1979)

Damn the Torpedoes is the RIAA Triple Platinum-certified third album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, released in late 1979. This was the first of three Petty albums originally released by the Backstreet Records label, distributed by MCA Records. It built on the commercial success and critical acclaim of his two previous albums and reached #2 on the Billboard album chart.

In 2003, the album was ranked number 313 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

Click here for album content from Wikipedia

Monday 8:30pm ET – Feature LP – Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers – You’re Gonna Get It (1978)

You’re Gonna Get It! is the second album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, released in 1978. Originally, the album was to be titled Terminal Romance. Like its self-titled predecessor, this album includes tight melodic songs awash in ringing guitars and organ. It reached #23 on Billboard’s Top LP’s & Tapes chart in 1978.

Many reviewers rated You’re Gonna Get It! only a notch lower than their moderately well-received debut album. Some reviews such as in Rolling Stone at the time noted the “impressive stylistic cohesiveness” between the two. It did chart higher, however, than its predecessor.

Click here for album content from Wikipedia

Monday 8pm: Feature LP – Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers is the debut album by the band of the same name, released on November 9, 1976 by Shelter Records.

Initially following its release, the album received little attention in the United States. Following a British tour, it climbed to #24 on the UK album chart and the single “Anything That’s Rock ‘n’ Roll” became a hit in the UK. After nearly a year and many positive reviews, the album reached the U.S. charts, where it climbed to #55 in 1978 and eventually went Gold. The single “Breakdown” cracked the Top 40 in the U.S. and “American Girl” became an FM radio staple that can still be heard today.

The album was recorded and mixed at the Shelter Studio, Hollywood, California.

Click here for album content from Wikipedia

Wednesday 9pm: Feature LP: Eagles Live (1980)

Eagles Live is the first live album by the American rock band Eagles, a two-LP set released on November 7, 1980. The Eagles was already breaking up after an argument between bandmates Glenn Frey and Don Felder on July 31, 1980, however, the band owed Elektra/Asylum Records one more album, and they fulfilled that obligation with a release of performances from the Hotel California and The Long Run tours.

Eagles Live was mixed by Frey and Don Henley on opposite coasts in Los Angeles and Miami, respectively, and as producer Bill Szymczyk put it, the record’s harmony and instrument fixes were made “courtesy of Federal Express.” The 1983 Rolling Stone Record Guide said it is “perhaps the most heavily overdubbed [live album] in history.” “Seven Bridges Road,” a Steve Young cover, was released as a single and became a top-40 hit.

Click here for album contents from Wikipedia