In Memoriam: Yvonne Staples (1938 – 2018)

Yvonne Staples, whose baritone helped propel the Staple Singers to the top of the music charts and into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999, has died at home in South Shore at 80, according to Chicago’s Leak & Sons Funeral Home.

RadioMaxMusic will feature the music of the Staple Singers at 8pm ET

Ms. Staples performed on hits including “Respect Yourself,” “I’ll Take You There” and “Heavy Makes You Happy” with her sisters Mavis and Cleotha and their father, guitarist Roebuck “Pops” Staples.

She was born in Chicago to Pops and Oceola Staples, both with Mississippi roots. She started singing with Mavis and their brother Pervis in the 1940s at their uncle’s church.  For more on this story click here

The Staple Singers were an American gospel, soul and R&B singing group. Roebuck “Pops” Staples (1914–2000), the patriarch of the family, formed the group with his children Cleotha (1934–2013), Pervis (b. 1935), and Mavis (b. 1939). Yvonne (1936–2018) replaced her brother when he was drafted into the U.S. Army, and again in 1970. They are best known for their 1970s hits “Respect Yourself”, “I’ll Take You There”, “If You’re Ready (Come Go with Me)”, and “Let’s Do It Again”, which with one exception (“I’ll Take You There”) peaked on the Hot 100 within a week from Christmas Day. While the family name is Staples, the group used “Staple” commercially. – Wikipedia

In Memoriam: Daryle Singletary (1971 – 2018)

Daryle Bruce Singletary (March 10, 1971 – February 12, 2018) was an American country music singer. Between 1995 and 1998, he recorded for Giant Records, for which he released three studio albums: Daryle Singletary in 1995, All Because of You in 1996 and Ain’t It the Truth in 1998. In the same timespan, Singletary entered the top 40 of the Hot Country Songs charts five times, reaching number two with “I Let Her Lie” and “Amen Kind of Love”, and number four with “Too Much Fun”.

In 2000, Singletary switched to Audium Entertainment (a division of Koch Entertainment), where he released the albums Now and Again (2000) and That’s Why I Sing This Way (2002), both of which were largely composed of cover songs. A third album of covers, 2007’s Straight from the Heart, was issued on the independent Shanachie Records label. He returned to Jack Noseworthy Studios (now renamed E1 Music) in 2010, to release Rockin’ in the Country.

Singletary died from an apparent blood clot at his Lebanon, Tennessee, home on the morning of February 12, 2018, according to a Taste of Country report. – Wikipedia

Daryle Singletary Dies

In Memoriam: Vic Damone (1928 – 2018)

Vic Damone (born Vito Rocco Farinola; June 12, 1928 – February 11, 2018) was an American traditional pop and big band singer, songwriter, actor, radio and television presenter, and entertainer who is best known for songs such as “You’re Breaking My Heart” (a number one hit), the number four hit “On the Street Where You Live” (from My Fair Lady), and “My Heart Cries for You” (also No. 4).

Vic Damone Dies At 89

In Memoriam: Dennis Edwards (1943 – 2018)

Photo by John Salangsang/Invision/AP/REX/Shutterstock (9195855t)Dennis Edwards (February 3, 1943 – February 2, 2018) was an American soul and R&B singer, notably a lead singer in The Temptations, on Motown Records. Edwards joined the Temptations in 1968, replacing David Ruffin and sang with the group from 1968 to 1976, 1980 to 1984 and 1987 to 1989. In the mid-1980s, he attempted a solo career, scoring a hit in 1984 with “Don’t Look Any Further” (featuring Siedah Garrett). Until his death, Dennis was the lead singer of The Temptations Review featuring Dennis Edwards, a Temptations splinter group.

Edwards was born in Fairfield, Alabama, about eight miles from Birmingham, to Reverend and Mrs. Dennis Edwards Sr., He began singing as a toddler, just two years old, in his father’s church. The Edwards family moved to Detroit, Michigan when Edwards was about ten years old, and Edwards would continue to sing in the church pastored by his father, eventually becoming choir director.

As a teenager, Edwards joined a gospel vocal group called The Mighty Clouds of Joy, and studied music at the Detroit Conservatory of Music. He was not allowed to sing or listen to secular music at home, and his mother disapproved when he began pursuit of a career singing rhythm and blues music. In 1961 he organized his own soul/jazz group, Dennis Edwards and the Fireballs. In 1961, Edwards recorded a single for the obscure Detroit label, International Soulville Records, “I Didn’t Have to (But I Did)” b/w “Johnnie on the Spot”.

Following time served in the US military, in 1966 Edwards auditioned for Detroit’s Motown Records, where he was signed but placed on retainer. Later that year, he was assigned to join The Contours after their lead singer fell ill. In 1967, the Contours were the opening act for several Temptations concerts, and Temptations members Eddie Kendricks and Otis Williams – who were considering replacing their own lead singer, David Ruffin (who was a personal friend of Edwards), took notice of Edwards and made his acquaintance.

Edwards died on February 2, 2018, one day prior to his 75th birthday, in a Chicago hospital after a long illness, the singer’s manager confirmed to ABC News. – Wikipedia

In Memoriam: Dave Holland (1948 – 2018)

David Holland (5 April 1948 – 16 January 2018) was an English rock drummer born in Northampton England, best remembered for his stints with Trapeze from 1969 to 1979 and Judas Priest from 1979 to 1989.

On 18 January 2018, management of Trapeze confirmed that Holland, who was “a very private person”, had died “a few days ago”, with no cause of death reported. Initially, his death was reported to be a hoax, when Judas Priest fans confused him with a jazz musician named Dave Holland.

On 22 January 2018, Spanish newspaper El Progreso reported that Holland had died six days earlier at Hospital Universitario Lucus Augusti in Lugo, Spain, a hospital close to A Fonsagrada, a town in the mountains where the drummer had lived at the time of his death. No cause of death was revealed, but the newspaper stated that he was already cremated. – Wikipedia

Billboard Obit

In Memoriam: Lari White (1965 – 2018)

Lari Michele White (May 13, 1965 – January 23, 2018) was an American country music artist and actress. She first gained national attention in 1988 as a winner on You Can Be a Star, a talent competition which aired on The Nashville Network. A recording contract with RCA Records Nashville followed a year later, producing three studio albums, a greatest hits package, and several chart singles, with three of her singles having reached Top Ten: “That’s My Baby” and “That’s How You Know (When You’re In Love)” at No. 10, and “Now I Know” at No. 5. A fourth studio album was released in 1998 on Lyric Street Records, followed by two more releases on White’s own label, Skinny White Girl. Overall, White has charted 12 times on the Billboard country music charts. – Wikipedia

WinCountry Obit

 

In Memoriam: James Rodford (1941 – 2018)

James Walter Rodford (7 July 1941 – 20 January 2018) was an English musician, who played bass guitar for several British rock groups. He was a founding member of Argent, which was led by his cousin Rod Argent, and performed with them from their formation in 1969 until they disbanded in 1976. He was the bass guitarist for The Kinks from 1978 until they disbanded in 1996. In 2004, he joined the reunited Zombies, whom he had been closely associated with since the early 1960s, and remained a member until his death in 2018. He was also a member of The Swinging Blue Jeans and The Kast Off Kinks.

Rodford met his wife, Jean, at the Pioneer Club in the early days of his music career. They have two sons, Steve, a drummer, and Russell, a guitarist. Rodford died after a fall on 20 January 2018, at age 76. – Wikipedia