In Memoriam: Charles Bradley (1948 – 2017)

Charles Edward Bradley (November 5, 1948 – September 23, 2017) was an American funk/soul/R&B singer, signed to the Daptone Records label under the Dunham Records division. His performances and recording style were consistent with Daptone’s revivalist approach, celebrating the feel of funk and soul music from the 1960s and 1970s. One review said he “echoes the evocative delivery of Otis Redding”.

Dubbed “the screaming eagle of soul”, Bradley was the subject of the documentary Soul of America which premiered at South by Southwest in 2012. – Wikipedia

LA Times Obit
The soul singer Charles Bradley, one of the most joyful and powerful contemporary vocalists in his genre, died Saturday morning. He was 68.

Representatives for the singer said in a statement that Bradley died of complications from stomach cancer, which had been in remission. Bradley toured up through the last year of his life.

Bradley, like his Daptone label mate, the late Sharon Jones, was a later-in-life soul music success story. He was discovered while working as a James Brown impersonator, and he released his debut album, “No Time For Dreaming,” in 2011. “The Screaming Eagle of Soul” quickly turned ears among vintage R&B enthusiasts and younger audiences at festivals like FYF Fest, where Bradley played in 2016 to raucous crowds.

His 2016 album “Changes” was widely praised and led to numerous mainstream television appearances, including a performance on “CBS This Morning: Saturday” that earned an Emmy nomination for outstanding on-camera musical performance in a daytime program.

Born in Gainesville, Fla., Bradley moved to Brooklyn as a child and lived all over the U.S. before returning to New York for the last 20 years of his life. He closely collaborated with a number of acts and backing bands in his career, including His Extraordinaires, Menahan Street Band, Budos Band and the Jimmy Hill Allstarz.

Musicians around the music world lamented his passing. The Daptone band Antibalas tweeted “RIP to our dear brother Charles Bradley. Your heart was too big for this planet. See you on the other side. We love you.” Singer-songwriter Neko Case wrote, over a picture of Bradley and Sharon Jones, that “I’ve had the honor of being completely and utterly blown off stage by both of these sweethearts.”

Representatives for the singer said, “Mr. Bradley was truly grateful for all the love he’s received from his fans and we hope his message of love is remembered and carried on.” – LATimes

In Memoriam: Don Williams (1939 – 2017)

Don Williams (May 27, 1939 – September 8, 2017) was an American country singer, songwriter, and 2010 inductee to the Country Music Hall of Fame. He began his solo career in 1971, singing popular ballads and amassing 17 number one country hits.

Williams was born in Floydada, TX, on May 27, 1939. He was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2010.

Williams was considered one of country music’s greatest voices, as well as one of its shyest. His nickname was the “Gentle Giant.”

His gentle baritone was beloved by fans across the world, including Africa and Europe.

Williams had his first hit with “The Shelter of Your Eyes” in 1973. Some of his most well-known chart toppers include “Tulsa Time,” “She Never Knew Me” and “It Must Be Love.” In total, he had 17 No. 1 hits.

In 1978, Williams was named male vocalist of the year by the Country Music Association. He retired in 2016 after a prolific career.

Arrangements have not yet been announced.

In Memoriam: Troy Gentry (1967 – 2017)

Troy “T-Roy” Gentry was born April 5, 1967, in Lexington, Kentucky.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the helicopter crashed into a wooded area near the Flying W Airport in Medford hours before Montgomery Gentry was due to perform at a resort that is also housed at the airport.

The airport announced the cancellation of the gig Friday afternoon.

Medford Township Police Chief Richard Meder told NJ.com that police got a call about a helicopter “that was distressed” around 1 p.m. He said crews were able to remove the passenger from the wreckage, but he died on the way to a hospital.

The pilot died at the scene and crews were working to remove his body, Meder said. It wasn’t immediately clear whether Gentry was the pilot or the passenger.

Gentry was born on April 5, 1967, in Lexington, Kentucky, where he met bandmate Eddie Montgomery and formed a group based off their last names. The duo had success on the country charts, scoring five No. 1 hits. The band was inducted into the Grand Ole Opry in 2009.

A spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration told the Courier-Post a Schweitzer 269 “crashed in a wooded area off the end of runway 1,” and that the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board would soon begin an investigation into the incident.

TV stations tweeted pictures of the crash scene.

 

In Memoriam: Dave Hlubek (1951 – 2017)

David Lawrence “Dave” Hlubek (August 28, 1951 – September 3, 2017) was the lead guitarist and founding member of the Southern rock band Molly Hatchet.

Dave Hlubek was born in Jacksonville, Florida. At the age of 5 or 6, Hlubek and his family moved to the naval base in Oahu, Hawaii, where he attended Waikiki Elementary School. From there, Hlubek’s father was transferred and the family moved to Sunnyvale, California, then to Mountain View, and finally settling in San Jose. There he attended the same Junior High School as Wayne Newton. It was the South Bay that Dave called home during the next few years, before moving back to Jacksonville, Florida around 1965. There he attended and graduated from Forrest High School.

He died of a heart attack on September 3, 2017, at the age of 66.

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http://ultimateclassicrock.com/molly-hatchet-dave-hlubek-dead/

In Memoriam: Walter Becker (1950 – 2017)

Walter Carl Becker (February 20, 1950 – September 3, 2017) was an American musician, songwriter, and record producer. He was best known as the co-founder, guitarist, bassist and co-songwriter of Steely Dan.

Becker met future songwriting partner Donald Fagen while studying at Bard College. After a brief period of activity in New York, the two relocated to California in 1971 and formed the nucleus of Steely Dan, who enjoyed a critically and commercially successful 10-year career. Following the group’s dissolution, Becker moved to Hawaii and reduced his musical activity, working primarily as a record producer. In 1985, he briefly became a member of the British sophisti-pop group China Crisis, producing and playing synthesizer on their record Flaunt the Imperfection.

Becker and Fagen reformed Steely Dan in 1993 and had remained active, most notably including their 2000 Two Against Nature album, which won four Grammy Awards. Becker also released two solo albums, 1994’s 11 Tracks of Whack and 2008’s Circus Money.

Following an undisclosed illness, Becker died on September 3, 2017. (Wikipedia)

In Memoriam: Glen Campbell (1936 – 2017) 6pm ET (Part I)

Glen Travis Campbell (April 22, 1936 – August 8, 2017) was an American rock and country music singer, musician, songwriter, television host and actor. He is best known for a series of hits in the 1960s and 1970s, and for hosting a music and comedy variety show called The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour on CBS television from January 1969 through June 1972.

During his 50 years in show business, Campbell released more than 70 albums. He sold 45 million records and accumulated 12 RIAA Gold albums, four Platinum albums and one Double-platinum album. He placed a total of 80 different songs on either the Billboard Country Chart, Billboard Hot 100, or the Adult Contemporary Chart, of which 29 made the top 10 and of which nine reached number one on at least one of those charts. Campbell’s hits include his recordings of John Hartford’s “Gentle on My Mind”; Jimmy Webb’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix”, “Wichita Lineman” and “Galveston”; Larry Weiss’s “Rhinestone Cowboy”; and Allen Toussaint’s “Southern Nights”.

Campbell made history in 1967 by winning four Grammys total in the country and pop categories. For “Gentle on My Mind”, he received two awards in country and western, “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” did the same in pop. Three of his early hits later won Grammy Hall of Fame Awards (2000, 2004, 2008), while Campbell himself won the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012. He owns trophies for Male Vocalist of the Year from both the Country Music Association (CMA) and the Academy of Country Music (ACM), and took the CMA’s top award as 1968 Entertainer of the Year. Campbell appeared as a supporting role in the film True Grit, which gave him a Golden Globe nomination for Most Promising Newcomer. Campbell also sang the title song which was nominated for an Academy Award.

Alzheimer’s diagnosis
In June 2011, Campbell announced he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease six months earlier. According to his family, symptoms of the disease had been occurring for years, becoming more and more evident as the years progressed.

Campbell went on a final “Goodbye Tour,” with three of his children joining him in his backup band. His final show was on November 30, 2012, in Napa, California. He performed “Rhinestone Cowboy” as a goodbye at the 2012 Grammy Awards ceremony held on February 12, 2012, his final televised on-stage performance.

In April 2014, news reports indicated that Campbell became a patient at an Alzheimer’s long-term care and treatment facility. On March 4, 2015, Associated Press reported that two of Campbell’s children, Debby and Travis, sought legal action against Campbell’s wife Kim, with the assertion she “secluded” the singer and prevented them from “participating” in Campbell’s medical care.

On March 8, 2016, Rolling Stone reported that Campbell was living in a Nashville memory care facility and that he was in the “final stages” of his disease. He was unable to communicate with people and understand what people said to him. However, his family also said he was receiving good care and was “happy” and “cheerful.”

On Campbell’s 80th birthday, Jimmy Webb, with whom Campbell frequently collaborated, announced he would launch a special edition of his national touring show on May 3, 2016, called “Jimmy Webb: The Glen Campbell Years” at Nashville’s City Winery.

Death
Campbell died of Alzheimer’s disease in Nashville, Tennessee, on August 8, 2017, six years after his diagnosis.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/08/entertainment/glen-campbell-dies/index.html