In Memoriam: Sib Hashian (August 17, 1949 – March 22, 2017)

As first reported by TMZ, and confirmed to ABC Radio by Adam, the veteran musician was performing on the Legends of Rock Cruise when he suffered a heart attack and could not be revived.

Sib Hashian joined Boston in 1975, replacing the group’s original drummer Jim Masdea, and went on to play on the group’s hugely successful first two albums: 1976’s self-titled effort and 1977’s Don’t Look Back. Sib also contributed to Boston’s third album, 1986’s Third Stage, but he was replaced by Masdea during its recording.

After exiting Boston, Hashian played with a variety of smaller-scale groups and other musical projects, including Ernie and the Automatics, which also featured ex-Boston guitarist Barry Goudreau. Goudreau also was one of the musicians taking part in the Legends of Rock Cruise.

Besides his son, Sib is survived by two daughters, Asa and Lauren Hashian (left). Lauren is an R&B singer/songwriter who is the longtime girlfriend of actor Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. The couple has a one-year-old daughter.

In Memoriam: Chuck Berry (October 18, 1926 – March 18, 2017) #chuckberry

Chuck Berry, whose rollicking songs, springy guitar riffs and onstage duck walk defined rock & roll during its early years and for decades to come, died on Saturday. The St. Charles County Police Department confirmed the news on Facebook. Berry was 90 years old.

“St. Charles County police responded to a medical emergency on Buckner Road at approximately 12:40 p.m. today (Saturday, March 18),” the Facebook post reads. “Inside the home, first responders observed an unresponsive man and immediately administered lifesaving techniques. Unfortunately, the 90-year-old man could not be revived and was pronounced deceased at 1:26 p.m.” It went on to confirm that the man was Berry and added that his family was requesting privacy at this time. Read more at http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/chuck-berry-rock-roll-innovator-dead-at-90

Charles Edward Anderson “Chuck” Berry (October 18, 1926 – March 18, 2017) was an American guitarist, singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of rock and roll music. With songs such as “Maybellene” (1955), “Roll Over Beethoven” (1956), “Rock and Roll Music” (1957) and “Johnny B. Goode” (1958), Berry refined and developed rhythm and blues into the major elements that made rock and roll distinctive, with lyrics focusing on teen life and consumerism and music featuring guitar solos and showmanship that were a major influence on subsequent rock music.

Born into a middle-class African-American family in St. Louis, Missouri, Berry had an interest in music from an early age and gave his first public performance at Sumner High School. While still a high school student he was convicted of armed robbery and was sent to a reformatory, where he was held from 1944 to 1947. After his release, Berry settled into married life and worked at an automobile assembly plant. Berry claimed on The Tonight Show he was influenced primarily by 1940s swing artist Louis Jordan. “The main guy was Louis Jordan. I wanted to sing like Nat Cole, with lyrics like Louis Jordan with the swing of Bennie Goodman with Charlie Christian on guitar, playing Carl Hogan’s riffs, with the soul of Muddy Waters.” By early 1953, influenced by the guitar riffs and showmanship techniques of the blues musician T-Bone Walker, Berry began performing with the Johnnie Johnson Trio.[3] His break came when he traveled to Chicago in May 1955 and met Muddy Waters, who suggested he contact Leonard Chess, of Chess Records. With Chess he recorded “Maybellene”—Berry’s adaptation of the country song “Ida Red”—which sold over a million copies, reaching number one on Billboard magazine’s rhythm and blues chart. By the end of the 1950s, Berry was an established star with several hit records and film appearances and a lucrative touring career. He had also established his own St. Louis nightclub, Berry’s Club Bandstand. But in January 1962, he was sentenced to three years in prison for offenses under the Mann Act—he had transported a 14-year-old girl across state lines.

After his release in 1963, Berry had more hits in the mid-1960s, including “No Particular Place to Go”, “You Never Can Tell”, and “Nadine”. By the mid-1970s, he was more in demand as a live performer, playing his past hits with local backup bands of variable quality. In 1979 he served 120 days in prison for tax evasion.

Berry was among the first musicians to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on its opening in 1986; he was cited for having “laid the groundwork for not only a rock and roll sound but a rock and roll stance.” Berry is included in several of Rolling Stone magazine’s “greatest of all time” lists; he was ranked fifth on its 2004 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll includes three of Berry’s: “Johnny B. Goode”, “Maybellene”, and “Rock and Roll Music”. Berry’s “Johnny B. Goode” is the only rock-and-roll song included on the Voyager Golden Record. – Wikipedia

In Memoriam: Clyde Stubblefield (April 18, 1943 – February 18, 2017)

Clyde StubblefieldClyde Stubblefield (April 18, 1943 – February 18, 2017) was an American drummer best known for his work with James Brown.

Stubblefield’s recordings with James Brown are considered to be some of the standard-bearers for funk drumming, including the singles “Cold Sweat”, “There Was a Time”, “I Got The Feelin'”, “Say It Loud – I’m Black and I’m Proud”, “Ain’t It Funky Now”, “Mother Popcorn”, “Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved” and the album Sex Machine.

His rhythm pattern on James Brown’s “Funky Drummer” is among the world’s most sampled musical segments. It has been used for decades by hip-hop groups and rappers such as Public Enemy, Run-D.M.C., N.W.A, Raekwon, LL Cool J, Beastie Boys and Prince, and has also been used in other genres. Stubblefield was featured in the PBS documentary, Copyright Criminals, which addressed the creative and legal aspects of sampling in the music industry.

Stubblefield died on February 18, 2017, from kidney failure. He had suffered from kidney disease since 2002, when he had a kidney operation. Pop icon Prince, who considered Stubblefield a drumming idol, was a major financial supporter, and had paid for about 80,000 dollars of the drummer’s healthcare costs, it was disclosed in 2016, since Stubblefield had no health insurance.

More Info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clyde_Stubblefield  
More Info: https://tvone.tv/47164/james-brown-drummer-clyde-stubblefield-dies-at-73/ 

In Memoriam: Al Jarreau (March 12, 1940 – February 12, 2017)

al-jarreauAlwin Lopez “Al” Jarreau (March 12, 1940 – February 12, 2017) was an American jazz singer

Jarreau was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the fifth of six children. His website refers to Reservoir Avenue, the name of the street where he lived. His father was a Seventh-day Adventist Church minister and singer, and his mother was a church pianist. He and his family sang together in church concerts and in benefits, and he and his mother performed at PTA meetings. – Wikipedia

Just days after announcing that he was retiring from touring after being hospitalized for exhaustion, legendary jazz singer Al Jarreau passed away Sunday morning in Los Angeles.

Read more at EBONY http://www.ebony.com/entertainment-culture/al-jarreau-dead#ixzz4YUoasrDZ
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In Memoriam: Maurice White (1941 – 2016)

maurice-whiteMaurice “Moe” White (December 19, 1941 – February 4, 2016) was an American singer-songwriter, musician, record producer, arranger and bandleader. He was the founder of the band Earth, Wind & Fire. He was also the older brother of current Earth, Wind & Fire member Verdine White, and former member Fred White. He served as the band’s main songwriter and record producer, and was co-lead singer along with Philip Bailey.

He won seven Grammys, and was nominated for a total of twenty Grammys. White was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Vocal Group Hall of Fame as a member of Earth, Wind & Fire, and was also inducted individually into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

Also known by his nickname “Reece”, he worked with several famous recording artists, including Deniece Williams, the Emotions, Barbra Streisand and Neil Diamond. White was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in the late 1980s, which led him eventually to stop touring with Earth, Wind & Fire in 1994. He retained executive control of the band, and remained active in the music business. – Wikipedia

The founder of soul group Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White, has died in the US, his brother has said. White, 74, died in his sleep in Los Angeles on Thursday morning. He suffered from Parkinson’s Disease. His band had a series of hits including September, Boogie Wonderland, Shining Star and After the Love has Gone. The singer-songwriter was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 1992 but his condition was reported to have got worse in recent months.

Maurice White Dies At 74. http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-35499149

In Memoriam: John Kenneth Wetton (June 12, 1949 – January 31, 2017)

john wettonJohn Kenneth Wetton (June 12, 1949 – January 31, 2017) was an English singer, bassist, and songwriter. He was born in Willington, Derbyshire, and grew up in Bournemouth. He rose to fame with bands Mogul Thrash, Family, King Crimson, Roxy Music/Bryan Ferry, Uriah Heep, and Wishbone Ash.

After his period with King Crimson, Wetton formed UK, and later he was the frontman and principal songwriter of the supergroup Asia, which proved to be his biggest commercial success. Their self-titled debut album sold eight million copies worldwide and was Billboard magazine’s No. 1 album of 1982. He later formed the duo Icon with Geoff Downes (ex-Yes, ex-Buggles), and since the 1990s had a successful solo career releasing a large number of studio and live albums.

Wetton had a long career as an in-demand session bass player, and collaborated with many members of progressive rock bands such as Yes (including Steve Howe, Bill Bruford, Geoff Downes, Alan White, Billy Sherwood and Peter Banks), Roxy Music and Bryan Ferry, and Genesis (Steve Hackett).
http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2017/01/31/asia-singer-and-bassist-john-wetton-dead-at-67.html

In Memoriam: Robert Thomas “Bobby” Freeman (June 13, 1940 – January 31, 2017)

bobby-freemanRobert Thomas “Bobby” Freeman (born June 13, 1940 – January 31, 2017) was an African-American soul and R&B singer, songwriter and record producer from San Francisco, California. He is best known for his two Top Ten hits, the first in 1958 on Josie Records called “Do You Want to Dance” and the second in 1964 for Autumn Records, “C’mon and Swim”.

Freeman was born and raised in San Francisco, California. He started singing in a doo-wop group, the Romancers, in his early teens, and first recorded with them for Dootone Records in 1956. Their recordings included “House Cat”, included on several later rock and roll compilations. However, the group soon fell apart, and Freeman started a new group, the Vocaleers (not to be confused with an earlier group of the same name who recorded “Is It a Dream”).

He also recorded some solo demos, including “Do You Want to Dance”, which were heard by a visiting record label executive, Mortimer Palitz of Jubilee Records. He signed Freeman to the label, and had the original recording overdubbed in New York by session musicians including guitarist Billy Mure. Released on the Jubilee subsidiary label Jamie, “Do You Want to Dance” quickly rose to number 5 on the pop chart and number 2 on the R&B chart in early 1958, when Freeman was still only 17. The song was covered later (as “Do You Wanna Dance”) by Del Shannon, the Beach Boys, Johnny Rivers, Bette Midler, John Lennon, Cliff Richard, Marc Bolan & T.Rex, the Mamas & The Papas, Bobby Vee and the Ramones.

Freeman appeared on American Bandstand and toured with such musicians as Fats Domino, the Coasters, and Jackie Wilson. Several of his follow-ups on Laurie, including “Betty Lou Got a New Pair of Shoes” and “Need Your Love”, a ballad, also made the pop charts. He left Laurie in 1960 and signed with King Records, reaching the charts again with “Shimmy Shimmy”. However, several of Freeman’s later recordings for King in the early 1960s went unreleased, for unexplained reasons. He did not return to the charts again until 1964, after signing for the Autumn label, when he had his second top ten hit with “C’mon and Swim”, a song written and produced by 20-year-old Sylvester Stewart, later known as Sly Stone. Freeman’s final hit was “S-W-I-M”, later in 1964.

In 1964, Bobby Freeman played nightly at the Condor Club in San Francisco where Carol Doda performed her topless go-go dancing shows. Mainly supporting himself as a singer in clubs by the late 1960s, he continued to release singles on various small local labels through to the mid-1970s, but met with little commercial success. He has performed at the Bay Area Music (“Bammy”) Awards in recent years. – Wikipedia