Wednesday 6pm: Max 20th Century – 1970 (Part II)

April 2 – The London Magistrate’s Court hears arguments on John Lennon’s indecency summons for his exhibition of erotic lithographs during his art exhibit on January 16.
April 3 – Minneapolis nightclub the Depot opens, eventually renamed to First Avenue.
April 10 – Paul McCartney publicly announces the break-up of The Beatles.
April 14 – Michael Nesmith announces he has left The Monkees.
April 17 – Johnny Cash performs at the White House at the invitation of President Richard M. Nixon.
April 20 – Paul McCartney’s first solo album, McCartney, is released.
April 24 – Grace Slick of Jefferson Airplane is invited to a tea party at the White House by Tricia Nixon, daughter of U.S. President Richard Nixon. Slick arrives at the party with Abbie Hoffman, who is on trial for conspiring to riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The pair planned to spike Nixon’s tea cup with a heavy dose of LSD. Slick is recognized (although Hoffman is not) and told to leave because she is on the FBI list.
May 4 – Charles Wuorinen, 32, becomes the youngest composer ever to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music.
May 8 – The Beatles’ last LP, Let It Be, is released.
May 16
Randy Bachman leaves the Guess Who to start up Brave Belt.
The Who release Live at Leeds which is their first live album. Since its initial reception, Live at Leeds has been cited by several music critics as the best live rock recording of all time.
May 20 – The Beatles’ film Let It Be premières in London and Liverpool. None of the four band members are in attendance at either screening.
May 23–24 – Grateful Dead make their first British appearance at Hollywood Festival, Newcastle-under-Lyme, on a bill also featuring Black Sabbath, Free, and José Feliciano. Everyone is completely upstaged by the previously unknown Mungo Jerry, whose debut single “In the Summertime” becomes the best-selling hit of the year.
June – Australian composer Peter Sculthorpe receives the MBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours.
June 3 – Kinks singer Ray Davies makes a 6000-mile round trip from New York to London and back- interrupting the band’s American tour- to re-record one word on their latest single “Lola”. In order to get any airplay in Great Britain he has to change the word “Coca-Cola” to a more subtile “cherry cola”.
June 7 – The Who play two shows of Tommy, at the New York Metropolitan Opera House.
June 13
“The Long and Winding Road” becomes the Beatles’ last U.S. Number 1 song, though it is never released as a single in Britain.
The Stooges play at the Cincinnati Pop Festival, Midsummer Rock.
July 4 – The music countdown show American Top 40 debuts.
July 17 – The Guess Who perform at the White House for President Nixon and his guest The Prince of Wales. At Pat Nixon’s request, they do not play their breakthrough hit “American Woman” due to the song’s supposed anti-American lyrics.
July 26 – Guitarist Jimi Hendrix plays at his hometown of Seattle at Sicks Stadium where, under the influence of drugs, he starts verbally abusing members of the audience.
August 3 – Janis Joplin makes her final TV appearance, on the Dick Cavett Show.
August 26–30 – The Isle of Wight Festival 1970 takes place on East Afton Farm off the coast of England. Some 600,000 people attend the largest rock festival of all time. Artists include The Moody Blues, Jimi Hendrix, The Who, The Doors, Chicago, Leonard Cohen, Miles Davis, Richie Havens, John Sebastian, Joan Baez, Ten Years After, Emerson, Lake & Palmer and Jethro Tull.
August 30 – The Rolling Stones open their European tour in Malmö, Sweden.