Wednesday 10pm: Rock Talk with Dominic Forbes

Dominic Forbes interviews Lou Gramm and following the interview we feature more music from Foreigner and Gramm.

Lou Gramm (born Louis Andrew Grammatico; May 2, 1950) is an American rock singer-songwriter, best known for being the original lead singer of the British-American rock band Foreigner.

Gramm traveled to New York to audition and got the job. Lou Grammatico then became Lou Gramm, and, with the band initially known as “Trigger,” and later renamed Foreigner, became one of the most successful rock vocalists of the late 1970s and 1980s. Circus magazine in 1978 upon release of “Hot Blooded” commented that Lou Gramm had a voice that Robert Plant might envy.

Foreigner’s first eight singles cracked the Billboard Top 20, making them the first band since The Beatles to achieve this. Gramm performed vocals on all of Foreigner’s hits including “Hot Blooded”, “Feels Like the First Time”, “Cold as Ice”, “Long, Long Way from Home”, “Double Vision”, “Blue Morning, Blue Day”, “Head Games”, “Dirty White Boy”, “Urgent”, “Juke Box Hero”, “Break It Up” and “Say You Will”. He co-wrote most of the songs for the band, which achieved two of its biggest hits with the ballads “Waiting for a Girl Like You”, which spent ten weeks at #2 on the 1981/82 American Hot 100, and “I Want to Know What Love Is”, which was a #1 hit internationally (US & UK) in 1985.

Gramm and Foreigner founder Mick Jones had a volatile chemistry that exploded into many a chart-topper, yet at times they clashed artistically. Following the band’s second album Double Vision, shifts in personnel began to take place. After the Head Games album release, Gramm and Jones jointly decided to reduce the band’s line up from the original six members to four members. The next album, which Gramm has called the high point of his work with Foreigner, was aptly titled 4. Gramm wanted the band to remain true to its purer rock origins, favoring music with a solid drum and guitar structure, whereas Jones embraced the 1980s style of synthesizer ballads he became known for. The next album, Agent Provocateur, took three years to release due to the ongoing creative differences between Jones and Gramm. – Wikipedia