In Memoriam: Gregg Allman (December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017)

When Gregg Allman began singing at Southern bars and clubs in the mid-1960s with his guitarist brother Duane, his untrained voice was “like a cross between Hank Williams with the croup and James Brown with no lips,” he later quipped.

His vocals bore a rough-edged rasp that Mr. Allman gradually refined into one of the most distinctive sounds in American music: a blend of Tennessee twang, traditional soul and gospel, and a hard-won sense of the blues.

Mr. Allman, 69, who died May 27 at his home in Savannah, Ga., was for decades the frontman of the Allman Brothers Band, a pioneering but conflict-ridden blues-rock collective that modeled its guitar runs on the melodies of Brahms and performed instrumental jams inspired by the improvisational jazz greats Miles Davis and John Coltrane.

His family announced the death on Mr. Allman’s official website but did not provide other details. Mr. Allman had a liver transplant in 2010 and had struggled with an irregular heartbeat, among other health problems in recent years. He recently began canceling concerts.

Mr. Allman released a half-dozen albums as a solo artist but was best known for his work with the Allman Brothers Band, which Duane Allman formed in 1969. The elder Allman, a preternaturally gifted slide guitarist, envisioned a lineup of two drummers and two guitarists, anchored by two Allmans — an outfit capable of doubling the musical possibilities and raw sonic power of a more traditional rock group. lick here to read more>

Gregory LeNoir “Gregg” Allman (December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017) was an American musician, singer and songwriter.

He is best known for performing in the Allman Brothers Band. He was born and spent much of his childhood in Nashville, Tennessee, before relocating to Daytona Beach, Florida. He and his brother, Duane Allman, developed an interest in music in their teens, and began performing in the Allman Joys in the mid-1960s. In 1967, they relocated to Los Angeles and were renamed the Hour Glass, releasing two albums for Liberty Records. In 1969, he and Duane regrouped to form the Allman Brothers Band, which settled in Macon, Georgia.

The Allman Brothers Band began to reach mainstream success by the early 1970s, with their live album At Fillmore East representing a commercial and artistic breakthrough. Shortly thereafter, Duane was killed in a motorcycle crash in 1971. The following year, the band’s bassist, Berry Oakley was also killed in a motorcycle accident very close to the location of Duane’s wreck. Their 1973 album Brothers and Sisters became their biggest hit, and Allman pursued a solo career afterward, releasing his debut album, Laid Back the same year. Internal turmoil took over the group, leading to a 1975 breakup. Allman was married to pop star Cher for the rest of the decade, while he continued his solo career with the Gregg Allman Band. After a brief Allman Brothers reunion and a decade of little activity, he reached an unexpected peak with the hit single “I’m No Angel” in 1987. After two more solo albums, the Allman Brothers reformed for a third and final time in 1989, and continued performing until 2014. He released his most recent solo album, Low Country Blues, in 2011, and his next, Southern Blood, is set to be released in 2017.

For his work in music, Allman was referred to as a Southern rock pioneer and received numerous awards, including several Grammys; he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. His distinctive voice placed him in 70th place in the Rolling Stone list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time”. Allman released an autobiography, My Cross to Bear, in 2012. – Wikipedia

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